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I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World (Young Readers Edition)

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When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. Instead, Malala's miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize. I AM MALALA is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls' education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons. I AM MALALA will make you believe in the power of one person's voice to inspire change in the world.


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When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education. On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. Instead, Malala's miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize. I AM MALALA is the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls' education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons. I AM MALALA will make you believe in the power of one person's voice to inspire change in the world.

30 review for I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World (Young Readers Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    Malala refused to believe girls should be denied an education. Why should girls not be allowed to attend school? It’s their right. So Malala spoke in favour of educating girls during a time when it was very dangerous to do so. But Malala was not afraid; she was determined. This is more than a simple memoir. Malala doesn’t just talk about herself—her past, her present and her future. She talks about what is around her; the world that surrounds her, and she points out what is right and what is wrong Malala refused to believe girls should be denied an education. Why should girls not be allowed to attend school? It’s their right. So Malala spoke in favour of educating girls during a time when it was very dangerous to do so. But Malala was not afraid; she was determined. This is more than a simple memoir. Malala doesn’t just talk about herself—her past, her present and her future. She talks about what is around her; the world that surrounds her, and she points out what is right and what is wrong about it, especially regarding women’s rights. It’s very inspirational and filled with cultural elements. I always knew education was important, because without education, there is little chance of a good future in the majority of places. Yet I never felt *how* important education was before I read this. Every time I think of my future, I think, ‘‘Oh god, another five years and a half of school to go before my life can really begin.’’ But that is so wrong. Because, if I need a diploma to tell me my life can start, does that mean I am presently not truly living? So from now on, I’m going to stop thinking like that and appreciate the fact that I can go to boring classes millions of people would sell an arm to be able to attend. Malala is a real girl. She doesn’t put on a show for us. She remains true to herself through everything, even after atrocious events have occurred—from the moment she starts to attend school to the day she wakes up in a hospital after being shot in the head by the Taliban. Religion is ever-present in this book, so if you cannot stand that, I suggest you do not read this book or, if you do, be respectful to Malala who is clearly a very religious person. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    My journey of biographies has taken me inside the lives of political figures, television personalities, and even those involved in cults and religious sects. This next book shifts focus while retaining the perspective of a girl (and young woman) at the narrative helm. In this piece, young Malala Yousafzai chimes in and offers some of her own opinions growing up and becoming an international advocate for universal primary education for all children. Malala lays a foundation for the reader with a My journey of biographies has taken me inside the lives of political figures, television personalities, and even those involved in cults and religious sects. This next book shifts focus while retaining the perspective of a girl (and young woman) at the narrative helm. In this piece, young Malala Yousafzai chimes in and offers some of her own opinions growing up and becoming an international advocate for universal primary education for all children. Malala lays a foundation for the reader with a brief background on her native Pakistan and how it came to fruition some seventy years ago. Predominantly Muslim, Pakistan found itself trying to protect its population from religious and cultural incursions from its neighbouring states while developing a powerful military in the region. The reader is also offered a decent backstory about the Yousafzai family in the Swat Valley, where a dedicated father sought to develop a school for area children. His impetus was to hone these skills at an early age before releasing them with a thirst for knowledge and the wherewithal to become Pakistan's future. The narrative explores this dream and fosters the growth from a dilapidated building into a successful initiative with over one thousand pupils attending annually. With the rise of the Taliban in neighbouring Afghanistan and the eventual American invasion of that country, the region's stability weakened and Pakistan found itself pulled in two directions. Malala recounts that while the Pakistani Government tried to pave the way for America and its forces, there was a strong and historical allegiance to Taliban forces, something the reader will have to discover within the pages of this book. When the Taliban pushed into Pakistan, they brought their literal interpretations of Koranic verses and tried to invalidate those who blasphemed, from women who were not veiled through to education for any girl. Malala discusses her horror at seeing this and how her father was bullied as principal of his own school. After a period of flight for their own safety, the Yousafzai family returned, only to discover that the Swat Valley had become a battleground between Taliban forces and the Pakistani military. Encouraged by her father to advocate for girls like herself, Malala continued to speak in favour of education for all and would not stand down. Momentum grew and she soon found herself speaking to large groups with Taliban leaders hiding in the shadows, but surely no one would try to harm a child. What began as blanket rule enforcement within the Swat Valley soon turned to the 'Talibanisation' of those who spoke out most vociferously against this minute interpretation of Islamic principles. In October 2012, Malala faced the ultimate retribution for speaking out against the Taliban when she was shot. The medical fallout found her sent to the United Kingdom, where Malala uses the latter few chapters to discuss her injuries and the slow recovery she made. Even in the face of this violence, Malala and her spirit never faded as she kept advocating for universal education, no matter one's socio-economic, religious, geographic, or physical background. She seeks to promote the idea that one girl's voice can make a difference, as long as there are many who are willing to listen. An interesting biographical piece that pushes the reader into many interesting directions and is sure to stir up much controversy amongst other reviewers. I found myself reading this book because of another great recommendation by a dear friend, not to jump on the burgeoning bandwagon or to sensationalise the life of this young woman. I wanted a great book that would educate me on issues with which I have little knowledge and found myself intrigued more than anything at what I discovered. This book explores the plight of a young girl trying to demonstrate the political and ideological struggles faced by a population powerless to push back against violent enforcement of contradictory rules. The oppression of a people who seek the freedom to obtain basic education is non-sensical. Doing so in the name of a loving God only strengthens the need for this freedom. The rationale to suppress is lost on me, though I am open to having someone explain it to me. There have been some who have commented that Malala does not speak for Pakistan or segments of the population. The fame she may garner from her efforts or this book do not interest me, nor should they lessen the message that she wishes to promote. This is Malala's story told through her own memories. I am baffled by those who feel they can call her own view wrong or that her personal beliefs are a hoax better kept in a journal than placed out for public discussion. Furthermore, to posit that Malala is a complete laughingstock in her own Pakistan seems highly generalised, but that is through my filter of free speech and expression, values that are fundamental in Canada, as I write these words. To vilify Malala for her own personal views undoubtably commences a slippery slope towards the antics undertaken by the Taliban. Far be it from me to deny these individuals their own right to disagree, though without a foundation for their arguments, I cannot admit to being swayed in the least. I would be remiss if I did not take a moment to look at the book itself and how it was presented to the reader. The biography flows well and offers a a strong message on numerous occasions. The reader receives a healthy dose of history (both of Pakistan and Malala) to help formulate an educated opinion without the sense of overload. Chapters move fluidly and Malala seeks to keep things light where she can. Vignettes and lessons about her life offer the narrative additional colour and shape, which provides some entertainment to offset some of the darker moments during the fight for freedom in the face of religious oppression. It is, however, hard to miss that Malala thrives on self-aggrandisement throughout the book, where she brags of scholastic achievements or must tell the reader who she spoke before so many and liaised with Ambassador X and World Leader Y. The reader must realise that this is a child and so the starry-eyed nature of that ego boost is to be expected, even if she plays the peacock well as she struts throughout her story. Overall, it was an educational read and I can see why it received such hype. Let us see if it will spark ongoing momentum to ensure all children have access and utilise educational facilities the world over. They are our future, right Neo? Kudos, Madam Yousafzai for helping me see the importance of your message. May you always have the courage to face your detractors and never let them derail your goals. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Churchill

    Not to be confused with the other edition with a very similar name, this is Malala's story 'rewritten for an audience her own age'. Having not read the original I can't really comment on what might have been changed here, though the idea of making any changes for a younger readership has me torn. I mostly disagree with the notion of 'watering down' or in any way omitting information in order to appeal to a younger audience, and in my experience YA readers are: 1. not easily offended or shocked, Not to be confused with the other edition with a very similar name, this is Malala's story 'rewritten for an audience her own age'. Having not read the original I can't really comment on what might have been changed here, though the idea of making any changes for a younger readership has me torn. I mostly disagree with the notion of 'watering down' or in any way omitting information in order to appeal to a younger audience, and in my experience YA readers are: 1. not easily offended or shocked, and 2. likely to read a book for its content if it takes their fancy regardless of the target market, so this edition seems redundant to me. However, as I said I can't really say what differences there are, and if just a handful more young readers pick this up because it says it's for them then that has to be a good thing. The only real concern is the amount of adults that will pick this edition up by mistake, I've seen that happen a lot already. So if you're considering grabbing a copy make sure you get the version you mean to!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Roze

    This was the Young Reads version, but it was still super compelling and informational! Wow! I never really knew the story behind Malala besides she was shot for standing up for women's education, so this was really informational! I read this for the Goodread's book club Diversity in All Forms! I recommend this book to everyone and I plan on still reading the adult version of this book. I bought a classroom set of this book, so I can read it with my students next semester :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    emily

    "This was my calling. Some powerful force had come to dwell inside me, something bigger and stronger than me and it made me fearless." Malala redefines the definition of hero and courage. An inspiration to all. She stood up for what she believed in (girl's rights & education) despite all odds - if that doesn't act as encouragement to pursue your dreams and never back down for what you believe is right, then I really don't know what is. The Young Learner's edition was written simply and "This was my calling. Some powerful force had come to dwell inside me, something bigger and stronger than me and it made me fearless." Malala redefines the definition of hero and courage. An inspiration to all. She stood up for what she believed in (girl's rights & education) despite all odds - if that doesn't act as encouragement to pursue your dreams and never back down for what you believe is right, then I really don't know what is. The Young Learner's edition was written simply and intellectually - both a dazzling story of courage and an insight into Pakistan and the lives of its citizens and the Taliban. I learned a lot from this book, not only about culture, and the world around me, but also about the importance of staying true to yourself and your beliefs in a world that is desperately trying to change you. I recommend this book - it's a truly great and insightful autobiography. I can only hope that you decide to pick it up!

  6. 4 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    Thank you to Orion for providing me with this book in return for an honest review! Firstly, I just want to mention that this memoir is the 'younger readers' version of her memoir titled, 'I Am Malala'. I think that older children in schools should definitely be reading this book and talking about it. It will open their eyes not only to the importance of education, but also to different cultures, religions, beliefs, countries and the impact that terrorism can have. Reading Malala's story was truly Thank you to Orion for providing me with this book in return for an honest review! Firstly, I just want to mention that this memoir is the 'younger readers' version of her memoir titled, 'I Am Malala'. I think that older children in schools should definitely be reading this book and talking about it. It will open their eyes not only to the importance of education, but also to different cultures, religions, beliefs, countries and the impact that terrorism can have. Reading Malala's story was truly an inspiring experience and even though I'm now fully aware of her story and everything that occurred, I still find myself wanting to read the Adult version of her memoir to see the differences and just because her story is so inspiring and encouraging that I would certainly read it again. I would definitely recommend this book to children and young adults over the age of 12, because even though it is the 'younger readers' version, it still contains mature themes and violence that could be disturbing to young children. I definitely highly recommend this book or even the adult version because it's definitely a book that anyone can get something out of. The fact that children in westernised countries hate going to school when Malala is fighting for the right to learn, it really puts things into perspective. To see a seventeen year old girl go through so much terror and trauma to go on to becoming such a success and an advocate for change is so inspirational.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    Such a powerful read!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lui Vega

    I mean, this person is a living saint. You need to read this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ✿Ivy Roots✿

    Title: I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World Author: Malala Yousafzai & Patricia McCormick Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers Edition: Audiobook, Young Readers Edition Pages: 240 Rating: 3.5/5 Recommended?: YES Review: We tend to remember the happiest, saddest, surprising, often the most tragic aspects of our pasts. In other words, we find the rather extreme moments in our lives to be the most memorable. With that being said, I remember the first time I Title: I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World Author: Malala Yousafzai & Patricia McCormick Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers Edition: Audiobook, Young Readers Edition Pages: 240 Rating: 3.5/5 Recommended?: YES Review: We tend to remember the happiest, saddest, surprising, often the most tragic aspects of our pasts. In other words, we find the rather extreme moments in our lives to be the most memorable. With that being said, I remember the first time I had learned about Malala Yousafzai and the tragedy that had struck her, and the unmatched unique bravery that led her to challenge the radical, discriminatory, and questionable theology of the Taliban. If anything Malala's life is a testimony, a token to all the men, women, boys, and girls who have stood up for what is right and who have spoken out against injustice, but were unfortunately silenced permanently by the forces of terrorism. Yousafzai's situations weren't perfect, but they were favorable: 1) Her wonderful father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, was an activist for female education, and as a result continued to encourage Malala's efforts in school. 2) Malala also had a deep love and enjoyed receiving an education (a right that is often taken for granted in many areas of the world). 3) Her family did not use the Quran against Malala, but rather, for her. 4) Above all, The Yousafzai’s were hardly coaxed with fear; these people pushed through the hateful attacks and threats. Malala’s family is a great example of the fearlessness we need more of in this world. Before reading this book, I did not understand why first learning about Malala seemed like such a monumental time in my life. Her story not only sent shivers down my spine, but it reminded me what ‘being good’ really means in such a horrid world. I now know why her story means something to me. Malala is a humble, fearless, and inspiring political figure who not only survived a bullet to the head (!!) but also exceeded the worldly expectations that the Taliban and the rest of Pakistan had of her. As I said, Malala is a testimony. She is a testimony to not only the courageous men and women that have passed but to the all of us. Her story is a testimony of what can happen when you defy injustice and remain rounded in the rights that you were born with. The book was an experience for me because, before reading her memoir, the only things I knew about Malala were things you could get off unreliable Wikipedia pages. You learn that Yousafzai, although extraordinary at her age, had dreams and hopes that aren’t so different to ours. Although the book is not as inspiring as Yousafzai’s story, there is a looming sense of greatness, struggle, and courage between the lines of every page.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    Malala Yousafzai is one incredible girl. I don't know a single person who isn't familiar with her. For those who don't recognize the name, she'd the one who was shot by the Taliban in Pakistan for taking a stand for education. I can't even fathom going through the things that she did. Now, for the review of the book. Malala herself gets a 5/5. She has an amazing story that everyone needs to hear. But the book fell through for me. There was lots of history about Pakistan and Islam, which is all Malala Yousafzai is one incredible girl. I don't know a single person who isn't familiar with her. For those who don't recognize the name, she'd the one who was shot by the Taliban in Pakistan for taking a stand for education. I can't even fathom going through the things that she did. Now, for the review of the book. Malala herself gets a 5/5. She has an amazing story that everyone needs to hear. But the book fell through for me. There was lots of history about Pakistan and Islam, which is all good and fine for those who are interested in that sort of thing. But all I really wanted was Malala's story, which was why the book itself gets 3/5.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    You need to read this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bibliovoracious

    Of course! It was amazing. It was a revelation to me that she was an activist from a family of change-makers, and she was targeted BECAUSE of her activism. I had somehow absorbed that it was a random attack, but no, they were trying to silence her! EPIC fail. The book is actually buoyant and fun. It's the story of a teenager, with teenager problems and ambitions that yes, somewhat exceed the usual, but a relatable life, until the event that changed everything. Her father comes out the real hero of Of course! It was amazing. It was a revelation to me that she was an activist from a family of change-makers, and she was targeted BECAUSE of her activism. I had somehow absorbed that it was a random attack, but no, they were trying to silence her! EPIC fail. The book is actually buoyant and fun. It's the story of a teenager, with teenager problems and ambitions that yes, somewhat exceed the usual, but a relatable life, until the event that changed everything. Her father comes out the real hero of her story, treating her differently than other girls might have been treated, that is, treating her like her brothers, and taking great risks. I'm glad for them they all survived.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    In a country where women aren’t allowed out in public without a man, we girls traveled far and wide inside the pages of our books. In a land where many women can’t read the prices in the markets, we did multiplication. In a place where, as soon as we were teenagers, we’d have to cover our heads and hide ourselves from the boys who’d been our childhood playmates, we ran as free as the wind. (p. 34) When I read Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl in 8th grade, I was deeply moved. I continue to In a country where women aren’t allowed out in public without a man, we girls traveled far and wide inside the pages of our books. In a land where many women can’t read the prices in the markets, we did multiplication. In a place where, as soon as we were teenagers, we’d have to cover our heads and hide ourselves from the boys who’d been our childhood playmates, we ran as free as the wind. (p. 34) When I read Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl in 8th grade, I was deeply moved. I continue to read more than typical amounts of resistance stories from WWII and other wars, as well as dystopian novels, both of which I see as sharing many of the same themes. I am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World is cut from the same fabric: deeply moving and empowering, Malala is someone who would be a good role model for a young girl or boy – and someone much older. So, yes, the Taliban have shot me. But they can only shoot a body. They cannot shoot my dreams, they cannot kill my beliefs, and they cannot stop my campaign to see every girl and every boy in school. (p. 188) This book can also be read as a model of resilience, to remind the reader that one can be resilient under any circumstances.If you tell yourself, “Malala, you can never go home because you are the target of the Taliban,” you just keep suffering. I look at it this way. I can see! I can hear! I can talk! I can go to school and I can fight with my brothers! I am having a second chance at life. And I am living the life God wants for me. (p. 186)I have considered reading I am Malala since shortly after it came out – but didn't and for no good reason. I read it now because a friend is using it in class in the fall and I try to read many things from her reading lists. She is using the Young Readers edition, describing its language as "poetic," as can be seen in the quotes here – its use of repetition and attention to rhythm and cadence. I had expected this book to be pedantic and heavy-handed, but it wasn't. If I were reading this as a teen, I would be able to see myself in this book. One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world. (p. 192). As my friends and I talked about I am Malala – and immigration and politics – I told one, a Moslem immigrant from Egypt, that I was worried about him in our political environment. Two friends talked about this idea (Egypt and the book): “You cannot be out this late in Birmingham,” he said. “This city, at night it can be dangerous.” My father and I looked at each other, then we explained to my mother what the boy had said. The poor boy was confused by our reaction. My father hugged him and thanked him. But we couldn’t quite explain. How could this quiet, orderly place be unsafe compared with what we had come from?I am Malala is, apparently, an exercise in relativity. Malala will turn 21 tomorrow; I had assumed she was much older. Her wisdom and courage are an inspiration.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joood Hooligan

    http://www.platypire.com/j-hooligan/i... I checked the audiobook out from the library, forgetting that I had bought the ebook when it was on sale... because I'm that sort of person. As amused and annoyed as I was with myself when I realized this, I actually ended up getting a better experience with the book this way. Malala speaks at the beginning and end of the book, and there's her UN speech as well. So, the audio version is definitely worth listening to. It's pretty emotional, hearing about how http://www.platypire.com/j-hooligan/i... I checked the audiobook out from the library, forgetting that I had bought the ebook when it was on sale... because I'm that sort of person. As amused and annoyed as I was with myself when I realized this, I actually ended up getting a better experience with the book this way. Malala speaks at the beginning and end of the book, and there's her UN speech as well. So, the audio version is definitely worth listening to. It's pretty emotional, hearing about how so many children in Pakistan are unable to be educated because their poor and/or female. I think it was very important of her to point out that the biggest issue with the ignorance there is because of this lack of education. These people are studying their holy text, but aren't understanding the words. That's something to be said of all religions. It's scary what happens when the uneducated come into power and twist a holy book to their desires. And knowing she stood up for her education despite the threats, she is amazing. Truly. I introduced my 5 year old son to the story of Malala last year, we own a couple picture books about her. I wanted him to know how important it is for all people to be given the opportunity to be educated. Also, I want to raise him to understand that there is no type of person better than another - people of all races, religions, genders, etc. all deserve the same opportunities. To me, the worst part of this was knowing there was a period of time when her father regretted letting her choose an education over her safety. I cannot even imagine the grief her parents went through. I've been reading a lot of non fiction lately, and I've noticed there is a lot of rambling in them. This book didn't have that. It is a fascinating story and I am so glad she lived through being shot. I wish I could afford to go to her talk in Houston, I expect it is going to be great.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This girl is a real inspiration. Sometimes I forget she was only 11 or 12 or 13 years old as she describes speeches she gave to various organisations long before she was shot. Her parents are also strong people who encouraged her all along and stood up for what they believed was right all the time. She explains how things changed politically in Pakistan over the years clearly and in a very balanced way. She loves her homeland and would love to go back but sadly as we know the Taliban have This girl is a real inspiration. Sometimes I forget she was only 11 or 12 or 13 years old as she describes speeches she gave to various organisations long before she was shot. Her parents are also strong people who encouraged her all along and stood up for what they believed was right all the time. She explains how things changed politically in Pakistan over the years clearly and in a very balanced way. She loves her homeland and would love to go back but sadly as we know the Taliban have strongholds in Pakistan and she is a major target for them. This is not an easy read at times as her family really did go through a lot but she never plays the "poor me" card. Her accounts are factual and detailed but boy thy were brave. It makes you realise how much normal people suffered and are still suffering because of these militant Muslim groups. They not only had the Taliban but also suffered the major earth quake and then flooding as well in the area of Swat where Malala and her family lived. I liked the inclusion of family photos too as it made her story much more intimate and gave faces to names she talked about.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    Malala was unlucky enough to be born in a country where girls were told they could not attend school. Malala was courageous enough to take a stand against this. Malala was unfortunate enough to be the victim of those who do not want girls to get an education. Malala was fortunate enough to live through the bombing. We are lucky to have Malala in the world, championing the rights of girls.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Santhi

    Inspiring... This Young Readers Editiion a must read for all school-going children!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Viir

    Malala is a strong woman who, at a very young age, started to campaign for women’s rights and education. I believe her parents played a big part in raising Malala to be humble but standing her ground and questioning her surroundings. This book not only describes her life till now but also how Pakistan changed with the Taliban, a very interesting read that I highly recommend.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rissa

    I am Malala Everything she loved was taken from her yet she rose up and changed the world as she knew it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Malala is an amazing, inspiring young woman, and I have great respect for her and her story. However, I was really not a fan of the way this was written. It came off very simple and young sounding (which I understand since Malala is very young and not a professional writer), and from the few biographies I have read this was not a favorite. I read this for school, and we also watched the Malala movie documentary. I feel her story was much better suited to movie format than book. I am glad I had the Malala is an amazing, inspiring young woman, and I have great respect for her and her story. However, I was really not a fan of the way this was written. It came off very simple and young sounding (which I understand since Malala is very young and not a professional writer), and from the few biographies I have read this was not a favorite. I read this for school, and we also watched the Malala movie documentary. I feel her story was much better suited to movie format than book. I am glad I had the opportunity to read this but I would recommended watching the very well made documentary rather than reading the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

    3.5 stars

  22. 5 out of 5

    Peeves

    I accidentally picked up the young reader's edition and hence my reading experience was slightly watered down. But i guess that is my fault for not picking up the correct version for my age. Generally, this book achieves what it initially set out do, which is to directly answer the question of 'Who is Malala?'. It gives us a sufficient inside look into the world of Malala and why is she the Malala we know today. People who already know who is Malala and what she fights for will be satisfied and I accidentally picked up the young reader's edition and hence my reading experience was slightly watered down. But i guess that is my fault for not picking up the correct version for my age. Generally, this book achieves what it initially set out do, which is to directly answer the question of 'Who is Malala?'. It gives us a sufficient inside look into the world of Malala and why is she the Malala we know today. People who already know who is Malala and what she fights for will be satisfied and even more impressed with this young girl's guts and passion as i was. Whilst people who don't know anything about Malala will be able to learn a whole lot of new things about the situation in Pakistan with the Taliban and it is a MUST read for any teen who is willing to expand their knowledge on current affairs and be more open minded. The book indeed does a great job of emphasizing the importance of fighting for something worthwhile and i am sure it will inspire many individuals to fight for their rights even if its only for a minute or so. However, the autobiography is not without its faults. Certain ideas felt forcefully fed in the book to the extent that it sounded artificial and repetitive. But i understand the need for the authors and the publication team to emphasize the fact that Malala is still a normal teen underneath everything that has been happening and that she will remain grounded with the support of her family, in order to relate to other teens around the world. All in all, i certainly do not regret reading this book but i do wish i picked up the adult version instead. I strongly recommend the young readers edition to all 10-15 year olds around the world. Please spare a moment to read this important book instead of pouring over autobiographies of teen singers and young Youtubers who have achieved nothing in comparison to Malala. I shall end this review with my heartfelt best wishes to Malala in all her future endeavors and hopefully she remains a beacon of hope to all those who need her. This girl is surely destined for great things. (InshaAllah) Oh and i almost forgot, #RESPECT for Malala's father. For the support, for the courage and for the love. Wouldn't the world be an incredible place to live in if every girl had a father like that? In that case, i recommend all parents to read this book too. Everybody can learn a thing or two.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I did not realize there are two different I Am Malala books and was disappointed that I had not read the adult version by Christina Lamb. However, Kasey, a phD student of literature, analyzed the two books and found this young readers edition to be the better of the two. She says, "Although I think that the Christina Lamb version does give more context to the story, which is important and useful, I think the biggest difference between the two books is that the latter sounds more like the Malala I did not realize there are two different I Am Malala books and was disappointed that I had not read the adult version by Christina Lamb. However, Kasey, a phD student of literature, analyzed the two books and found this young readers edition to be the better of the two. She says, "Although I think that the Christina Lamb version does give more context to the story, which is important and useful, I think the biggest difference between the two books is that the latter sounds more like the Malala we hear in her speeches. The young readers edition focuses more on Malala’s story itself and uses more direct language as well. Not only was it more enjoyable to read, it seemed more like she had actually written it herself." Then Kasey goes on to illustrate the differences. It is the sobering story of life in Pakistan under the heavy burden of the Taliban; of an ordinary, yet heroic girl with parents who valued equality of education for all and encouraged their daughter to think for herself.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie

    I don't really like non-fiction books but I am Malala kept me wanting to read all day!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    Whoops. I didn't realize there were two books! I read the Young Adult version, but I'm going to pick up the other version next!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maddie L

    I rate this book a four. I enjoyed reading about her past and how much Malala believed it was a right to have education for women. It was so inspirational and powerful to read and I recommend it to everyone!!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Thuong Le

    I don't watch the BBC News anymore (when I should do!) I have to excuse myself for being behind on the loop. So the first time I heard about Malala Yousafzai was on Teens React. All I knew from the video was that it was about a girl who got shot by the Taliban for speaking out for girls’ right to an education. She survived the shot and since then has continued her campaign and won many prestigious prizes including the Noble Peace Prize. This book was absolutely AMAZING. Honestly, I don’t remember I don't watch the BBC News anymore (when I should do!) I have to excuse myself for being behind on the loop. So the first time I heard about Malala Yousafzai was on Teens React. All I knew from the video was that it was about a girl who got shot by the Taliban for speaking out for girls’ right to an education. She survived the shot and since then has continued her campaign and won many prestigious prizes including the Noble Peace Prize. This book was absolutely AMAZING. Honestly, I don’t remember the last book I read where I felt really inspired and touched. Some of us complain about school (I was one of them), complain about teachers, how much homework you have to do and how much exams you have to study for. You often hear the phrase ‘school sucks,’ and I do understand the feeling, but sometimes we don’t appreciate free education, as we should do. There is a reason why school is compulsory. But here is a young girl called Malala Yousafzai who is the top of her class, loves going to school and loves learning new things. Malala fights for a girl’s right to an education because the Taliban has banned it in Swat Valley, where she lived. The Taliban say its because schools are promoting Western cultures (something along those lines) It’s absolutely outrageous. Why is it that boys are allowed to go to school and not girls? Malala wasn’t going to just sit back and allow her right to an education to be taken away from her. Therefore she took action. With the influence from Malala’s father and the encouragement from her mother, she was able to gain the confidence to stand up for girls’ education and allow for her voice to be heard all around the world. Even though she was shot in the head and survived, she did not allow this to prevent her from doing something she truly believes in and that's really inspirational. Malala is someone that all girls should look up to. Before reading this, I was unaware of what was really happening in Pakistan and it has given me an eye-opener into Malala’s life and it’s interesting to read about her culture. It was dangerous for her to work undercover as a blogger for the BBC and speaking out in public because it could get her killed, but she did it because she disagrees with the Taliban law. If not her, then who will? I really admired her passion and determination. I highly recommend this. I think it teaches you a lot about human rights and activism. Make sure you pick up the full version! I picked up the teen version thinking it was the full version. My review doesn’t do the book justice; you should read it for yourself. Last book read in 2015. This is 100% a 5 star book! This was a very inspirational and thought-provoking read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marla

    What an amazing story and human being. I remember when Malala was shot and was shocked that someone would do such an act of violence towards someone who just wanted an education. I've seen her on the Daily Show and Malala is a very well spoken and smart individual. It was also brave of her father and mother to want her to get an education. I listened to the audio book, which was probably better for me as I wouldn't have been able to pronounce all the names. I highly recommend this book and I'm What an amazing story and human being. I remember when Malala was shot and was shocked that someone would do such an act of violence towards someone who just wanted an education. I've seen her on the Daily Show and Malala is a very well spoken and smart individual. It was also brave of her father and mother to want her to get an education. I listened to the audio book, which was probably better for me as I wouldn't have been able to pronounce all the names. I highly recommend this book and I'm looking forward to seeing the movie. I hope she continues to make a difference in this world that is increasingly experiencing more hate crimes every day. Her story always makes me wonder why we all just can't get along. Pick it up and educate yourself. I know I learned a lot from this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Clark

    Malala, her parents and her friends are all amazing and brave. She spoke out when she knew it could get her hurt, because she has a true passion for it. She wants everyone to have a education, and nothing will stop her from speaking about it, nothing will stop her from getting her education. Her parents are both very supportive of her. I love how despite all her work, she is still just a normal kid under it all. She is very honest and down to earth as well. Her thought of "Books not Bullets" is Malala, her parents and her friends are all amazing and brave. She spoke out when she knew it could get her hurt, because she has a true passion for it. She wants everyone to have a education, and nothing will stop her from speaking about it, nothing will stop her from getting her education. Her parents are both very supportive of her. I love how despite all her work, she is still just a normal kid under it all. She is very honest and down to earth as well. Her thought of "Books not Bullets" is a very relevant one, and one that lots of people could benefit from. Malala is a role model for anyone. I want to eventually read the original version of this.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Martina

    Well, once you overlook the young readers' language simplicity and get into it, you... well... get into it. The book as such is neither great nor original from a literary perspective, but it has a message which may or may not be good for something, so that gives it plus points. It also has its more than fair share of pathos, which gives is minus points, but I chose to overlook that. I have to admit, throughout the book I went from laughing at Malala's weird obsession with school (absolutely Well, once you overlook the young readers' language simplicity and get into it, you... well... get into it. The book as such is neither great nor original from a literary perspective, but it has a message which may or may not be good for something, so that gives it plus points. It also has its more than fair share of pathos, which gives is minus points, but I chose to overlook that. I have to admit, throughout the book I went from laughing at Malala's weird obsession with school (absolutely weird for a kid, come on!) to really admiring her. Even though there must be a certain poetic licence to the true story, it was still pretty impressive...

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