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The adventure of the blue carbuncle: (low cost). limited edition

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Watson visits his friend Holmes at Christmas time and finds him contemplating a battered old hat, brought to him by the commissionaire Peterson after the hat and a Christmas goose had been dropped by a man in a scuffle with some street ruffians. Peterson takes the goose home to eat, but later returns to Holmes with a blue carbuncle his wife had found in the bird's crop Watson visits his friend Holmes at Christmas time and finds him contemplating a battered old hat, brought to him by the commissionaire Peterson after the hat and a Christmas goose had been dropped by a man in a scuffle with some street ruffians. Peterson takes the goose home to eat, but later returns to Holmes with a blue carbuncle his wife had found in the bird's crop (throat). Holmes makes some interesting deductions concerning the owner of the hat from simple observations of its condition, conclusions amply confirmed when an advertisement for the owner produces the man himself: Henry Baker. Holmes cannot resist such an intriguing mystery, and he and Watson set out across the city to determine exactly how the jewel, stolen from the Countess of Morcar during her stay at a hotel, wound up in a goose's crop. The man who dropped the goose, Mr. Henry Baker, comes to reclaim his hat in response to Holmes' advertisement. Holmes drops hints about how he saved the "innards" of the goose, but Baker fails to respond to them, simply saying that he is afraid goose remains are not much use. He does, however, give Holmes valuable information, eventually leading him to the conclusive stage of his investigation, at Covent Garden. Holmes offers a fresh goose to Henry Baker, who responds with gladness and departs, whereupon Holmes tells Watson that Baker is eliminated from the suspect list as he obviously knows nothing about the carbuncle. At Covent Garden, a salesman named Breckinridge gets angry with Holmes, complaining about all the people who have pestered him about geese sold recently to the landlord of the Alpha Inn. Clearly, someone else knows that the carbuncle was in a goose and is looking for the bird.


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Watson visits his friend Holmes at Christmas time and finds him contemplating a battered old hat, brought to him by the commissionaire Peterson after the hat and a Christmas goose had been dropped by a man in a scuffle with some street ruffians. Peterson takes the goose home to eat, but later returns to Holmes with a blue carbuncle his wife had found in the bird's crop Watson visits his friend Holmes at Christmas time and finds him contemplating a battered old hat, brought to him by the commissionaire Peterson after the hat and a Christmas goose had been dropped by a man in a scuffle with some street ruffians. Peterson takes the goose home to eat, but later returns to Holmes with a blue carbuncle his wife had found in the bird's crop (throat). Holmes makes some interesting deductions concerning the owner of the hat from simple observations of its condition, conclusions amply confirmed when an advertisement for the owner produces the man himself: Henry Baker. Holmes cannot resist such an intriguing mystery, and he and Watson set out across the city to determine exactly how the jewel, stolen from the Countess of Morcar during her stay at a hotel, wound up in a goose's crop. The man who dropped the goose, Mr. Henry Baker, comes to reclaim his hat in response to Holmes' advertisement. Holmes drops hints about how he saved the "innards" of the goose, but Baker fails to respond to them, simply saying that he is afraid goose remains are not much use. He does, however, give Holmes valuable information, eventually leading him to the conclusive stage of his investigation, at Covent Garden. Holmes offers a fresh goose to Henry Baker, who responds with gladness and departs, whereupon Holmes tells Watson that Baker is eliminated from the suspect list as he obviously knows nothing about the carbuncle. At Covent Garden, a salesman named Breckinridge gets angry with Holmes, complaining about all the people who have pestered him about geese sold recently to the landlord of the Alpha Inn. Clearly, someone else knows that the carbuncle was in a goose and is looking for the bird.

30 review for The adventure of the blue carbuncle: (low cost). limited edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    karen

    WELCOME TO DECEMBER PROJECT! last year, i carved out my own short story advent calendar as my project for december, and it was so much fun i decided to do it again this year! so, each day during the month of december, i will be reading a short story and doing the barest minimum of a review because ain't no one got time for that and i'm already so far behind in all the things. however, i will be posting story links in case anyone wants to read the stories themselves and show off how maybe someone WELCOME TO DECEMBER PROJECT! last year, i carved out my own short story advent calendar as my project for december, and it was so much fun i decided to do it again this year! so, each day during the month of december, i will be reading a short story and doing the barest minimum of a review because ain't no one got time for that and i'm already so far behind in all the things. however, i will be posting story links in case anyone wants to read the stories themselves and show off how maybe someone could have time for that. here is a link to the first story in last year's project, https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... which in turn links to the whole monthlong project, in case you wanna do some free short story reading of your own! links to the stories in this year's advent-ure will be at the end of each review. enjoy, and the happiest of decembers to you all! DECEMBER 27 I had called upon my friend Sherlock Holmes upon the second morning after Christmas, with the intention of wishing him the compliments of the season. i've read very little sherlock holmes - just a few stories here and there, but i figured what better time to read a story that takes place the day after boxing day than on...the day after boxing day? this is the mystery of a hat and a goose and a sparkly blue carbuncle (which sounds really gross, but is apparently not only a hideous eruption of boils or whatever, but also a beautiful jewel. the english language is such a joker.) and i was enjoying it, until the end, where it seemed to get wrapped up quickly and kind of chunkily, and i thought maybe i'd fallen asleep and missed something, but when i got to the comments section of the story, some dude pointed out that they'd messed up and lost great swathes of text. so now i'm going to go reread it elsewhere. sigh - worst day-after-boxing-day ever. hold please. oh, yeah - it is much more satisfying to read the complete story. read it for yourself here: https://www.tor.com/2011/12/27/the-ad... unless, of course, you'd rather not read a jacked-up version. in which case read it for yourself HERE: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1661/1... (although gutenberg has no pictures) DECEMBER 1 DECEMBER 2 DECEMBER 3 DECEMBER 4 DECEMBER 5 DECEMBER 6 DECEMBER 7 DECEMBER 8 DECEMBER 9 DECEMBER 10 DECEMBER 11 DECEMBER 12 DECEMBER 13 DECEMBER 14 DECEMBER 15 DECEMBER 16 DECEMBER 17 DECEMBER 18 DECEMBER 19 DECEMBER 20 DECEMBER 21 DECEMBER 22 DECEMBER 23 DECEMBER 24 DECEMBER 25 DECEMBER 26 DECEMBER 28 DECEMBER 29 DECEMBER 30 DECEMBER 31

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    "The Blue Carbuncle" is a Sherlock Holmes story anthologized in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, which you can read online or download free here at Project Gutenberg. We are not talking about the nasty skin abscess kind of carbuncle here; a carbuncle is also this: ... carbuncles are, by definition, red jewels, but Sherlock says there are also blue ones. And who am I to argue with him? (Okay, he's wrong; seriously, there are no blue carbuncles. Moreover carbuncles--the red ones--are not made "The Blue Carbuncle" is a Sherlock Holmes story anthologized in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, which you can read online or download free here at Project Gutenberg. We are not talking about the nasty skin abscess kind of carbuncle here; a carbuncle is also this: ... carbuncles are, by definition, red jewels, but Sherlock says there are also blue ones. And who am I to argue with him? (Okay, he's wrong; seriously, there are no blue carbuncles. Moreover carbuncles--the red ones--are not made of carbon, unlike diamonds. :P) This story also contains a goose. The goose was intended for Christmas dinner for one Mrs. Henry Baker, but unfortunately for her was dropped by the man delivering it to her when a police commissionaire startled him. The man also dropped his hat, a clue for Sherlock to his identity. But in the meantime, the commissionaire decides to go ahead and eat the goose. In its craw he finds the aforementioned blue carbuncle, worth at least £20,000, which had been recently stolen from the Countess of Morcar. But who stole it, and can Sherlock Holmes track down the jewel thief? The game is afoot! This was a fun story; I enjoyed Sherlock's deductive and investigative process here, even though he makes some wild leaps in analyzing the owner of the hat. What if his wife was lazy rather than unloving? and let's not get into the phrenology aspect, where large head size = intelligence. I particularly liked the way he manipulates a particular person into giving him the information Sherlock wants. Sherlock Holmes looked deeply chagrined. He drew a sovereign from his pocket and threw it down upon the slab, turning away with the air of a man whose disgust is too deep for words. A few yards off he stopped under a lamp-post and laughed in the hearty, noiseless fashion which was peculiar to him. “When you see a man with whiskers of that cut and the ‘Pink ’un’ protruding out of his pocket, you can always draw him by a bet,” said he. “I daresay that if I had put £100 down in front of him, that man would not have given me such complete information as was drawn from him by the idea that he was doing me on a wager."And once again we see that Sherlock Holmes has a bit of a soft heart. D'aww! Next up: The Adventure of the Speckled Band. Huzzah!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    In The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle Conan Doyle offers up a tale of goodwill that has a darker flipside. The goodwill sees Sherlock Holmes trying to return a hat and goose lost by someone on Christmas Day, but the story then deals with the theft of a precious stone, the Blue Carbuncle. The prowess of Holmes is displayed in the detective deducing much about the owner of the hat and the goose simply from examining the battered hat; though, the solving of the missing stone has much more to do with In The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle Conan Doyle offers up a tale of goodwill that has a darker flipside. The goodwill sees Sherlock Holmes trying to return a hat and goose lost by someone on Christmas Day, but the story then deals with the theft of a precious stone, the Blue Carbuncle. The prowess of Holmes is displayed in the detective deducing much about the owner of the hat and the goose simply from examining the battered hat; though, the solving of the missing stone has much more to do with legwork than deduction. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle imbues a certain amount of humour into The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle, humour that is not present in most of the short stories, but of course, there is also darkness, as a serious crime has been committed as well. As with the case of the Boscombe Valley Mystery Holmes shows an indifference to the judicial system, allowing a criminal once again to escape justice. The criminal in this case though, is arguably, less deserving of the leniency offered by the consulting detective. As with so many of the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Sherlock Holmes stories, the Granada TV series, with Jeremy Brett as Holmes, faithfully keeps to the original storyline for its adaptation of The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David

    This was a freebie from Audible.com. I read all the Sherlock Holmes stories when I was a kid, but I don't remember much about them individually, so it was fun to revisit Holmes and Watson for this light-hearted story of a Christmas goose that swallowed a stolen gemstone. One thing that struck me was that the vaunted "deductive reasoning" of Holmes is really kind of laughable at times. "I have no doubt that I am very stupid, but I must confess that I am unable to follow you. For example, how did This was a freebie from Audible.com. I read all the Sherlock Holmes stories when I was a kid, but I don't remember much about them individually, so it was fun to revisit Holmes and Watson for this light-hearted story of a Christmas goose that swallowed a stolen gemstone. One thing that struck me was that the vaunted "deductive reasoning" of Holmes is really kind of laughable at times. "I have no doubt that I am very stupid, but I must confess that I am unable to follow you. For example, how did you deduce that this man was intellectual?" For answer Holmes clapped the hat upon his head. It came right over the forehead and settled upon the bridge of his nose. "It is a question of cubic capacity," said he; a man with so large a brain must have something in it." Yup, "big head" = "intellectual." Okay, be fair, this is what the Victorians thought, and Holmes was a detective, not a physiologist. Still, I noticed a lot of his other "deductions" were more like educated guesses that he brushes with the shiny imprimatur of absolute conviction. These lead him, of course, to the true culprit, in a low-key mystery rather full of improbable twists. But it's fun and kind of Christmasy in a secularish way, which is cool by me, and Alan Cummings's jovial reading is perfect.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    Read thanks to the Literary Advent Calendar by BookRiot.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rita

    I love anything Sherlock Holmes

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jaksen

    I am presently reading all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels, using annotated versions. First off, not the best in the bunch, not by far, not by halves. There are so many errors in this story it's hard to belive ACD even had an editor. (Maybe he didn't.) Even before I read the annotated 'criticisms' in the version I was reading I was thinking, what? What! For one thing Holmes describes a man, who will be coming to see him, only by studying the man's hat. Okay, big head = smart. I am, what? I am presently reading all the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels, using annotated versions. First off, not the best in the bunch, not by far, not by halves. There are so many errors in this story it's hard to belive ACD even had an editor. (Maybe he didn't.) Even before I read the annotated 'criticisms' in the version I was reading I was thinking, what? What! For one thing Holmes describes a man, who will be coming to see him, only by studying the man's hat. Okay, big head = smart. I am, what? Okay, phrenology, still popular in the late 19th century. But then he goes on to say the man isn't particularly 'fit' because there's evidence of sweat on the inner lining of the hat? (The conclusion being that he sweats because he's NOT accustomed to physical exercise.) But what hat doesn't have evidence of perspiration - do 'fit' men not sweat? I didn't get it. There's also the matter of the man carrying his hat upstairs and getting 'tallow' on it from a candle, but who carries a hat and a lit candle in the same hand? And in Holmes' day hats were hung up upon entering one's own house and so on and so on... I was not the only critic, as many of Holmes' most devoted followers have pointed out the same errors and more. However, when they do, they make all sorts of 'allowances' for him, the most common of which is that 'Watson' has obviously made an error in his recording of Holmes' investigations. Balderdash I say! They are too kind to Mr. Holmes! Anyhow, having said all that, the story is about a stolen 'carbuncle,' which is blue, (and in the real world doesn't exist, btw, but who cares!) and a goose and a theft. There is much running about from here to there as Holmes and sidekick Watson try to figure out who stole this precious gem and just how it got stuck in the 'crop' of a goose. (And geese, btw, don't have crops, not technically.) So in effect it was a lot of errors, running around, silliness and (mis)information about geese and at the end, well... A surprising end, I do grant that, and it's the only reason I give this Holmes story three stars instead of two!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This is only the second Sherlock Holmes story I've read - well, second official ACD Sherlock story, as I've read other peoples' stories with or about Holmes and whatnot. And I enjoyed it, in some ways more than the first one, but still I felt like this little story was lacking, or unfinished in some way. This was read by Alan Cummings, who did a great job, with two little nitpicky exceptions: 1) that he read just a teensy bit too fast; and 2) that there wasn't enough differentiation between This is only the second Sherlock Holmes story I've read - well, second official ACD Sherlock story, as I've read other peoples' stories with or about Holmes and whatnot. And I enjoyed it, in some ways more than the first one, but still I felt like this little story was lacking, or unfinished in some way. This was read by Alan Cummings, who did a great job, with two little nitpicky exceptions: 1) that he read just a teensy bit too fast; and 2) that there wasn't enough differentiation between Holmes and Watson. It was hard for me to tell them apart unless there was a "Holmes said" or "I said" (since, of course, the stories are narrated by Watson). The story was interesting, in so much as it's always interesting to see what Holmes can learn from an everyday item, but honestly, I wasn't interested in the mystery behind why he was commissioned to do so. I didn't much care that the blue carbuncle was stolen, and honestly, if I had a carbuncle of any color, I'd want it to be stolen. TAKE MY CARBUNCLE, PLEASE! OK, OK, this is the gemstone carbuncle, not the hideous boil carbuncle, but still, I didn't much care how, or why, or by whom it was stolen. But, I did like the end resolution in which Holmes shows that he's got both a heart and a little lawlessness in him. No harm, no foul. OK story, more than OK Holmes... 3 stars. :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" is the seventh story in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes story collection, the third publication in the Sherlock Holmes series (after the first two novels, so the first story collection). Holmes is consulted by a man who witnessed a man be accosted by some thugs on the street, resulting in him dropping and leaving his hat and goose. Holmes says he will attempt to trace the man to return his hat, but advises him to eat the goose or else it will go "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" is the seventh story in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes story collection, the third publication in the Sherlock Holmes series (after the first two novels, so the first story collection). Holmes is consulted by a man who witnessed a man be accosted by some thugs on the street, resulting in him dropping and leaving his hat and goose. Holmes says he will attempt to trace the man to return his hat, but advises him to eat the goose or else it will go bad.... but when his wife goes to cook it, they're surprised to discover it contains a priceless - and recently stolen - gem. Another great story, as all in this particular collection are really.

  10. 4 out of 5

    m a r y l i z

    "My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people don't know." Behind on reading challenge? SOLUTION: read a Sherlock Holmes short story. *thumbs up* I'm totally obsessed with Doyle's writing style. It's very rich and flows SO WELL. The mystery element of this wasn't super impressive, but the writing and setting and characters were lovely. This is a story I can foresee myself wanting to read again, probably at Christmastime because of the setting. <3 (Oh, and can we talk "My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people don't know." Behind on reading challenge? SOLUTION: read a Sherlock Holmes short story. *thumbs up* I'm totally obsessed with Doyle's writing style. It's very rich and flows SO WELL. The mystery element of this wasn't super impressive, but the writing and setting and characters were lovely. This is a story I can foresee myself wanting to read again, probably at Christmastime because of the setting. <3 (Oh, and can we talk about how soft-hearted Sherlock was in this one?? MY HEART.) 4 stars!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    In my late teens I went through a Sherlock Holmes phase. I read all the longer ones, plus the major shorts and novellas. Then I branched out to Sherlock Holmes stories written by other authors. I am not sure if I actually ever read the Blue Carbuncle before though. Didn't ring a bell. The story struck me as a little silly, especially the deduction that someone with a big head is intelligent. The story was ok, I guess. It just wasn't my thing. And, surprisingly, I did not like the audiobook In my late teens I went through a Sherlock Holmes phase. I read all the longer ones, plus the major shorts and novellas. Then I branched out to Sherlock Holmes stories written by other authors. I am not sure if I actually ever read the Blue Carbuncle before though. Didn't ring a bell. The story struck me as a little silly, especially the deduction that someone with a big head is intelligent. The story was ok, I guess. It just wasn't my thing. And, surprisingly, I did not like the audiobook narration by Alan Cumming much. Somehow his accent didn't do it for me and I thought that he made Holmes sound like a tosser.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jason Donoghue

    A short story and yet a simple story but yet written with such skill it is a classic. I find myself inspired by sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Sherlock Holmes, so much so that I will soon begin writing a short story series of books.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    Another great adventure and mystery.. Only Arthur Conan Doyle writes such fluently and gripping detective stories.. The immortal classic series still works for me!! "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" does not fail to satisfy both Sherlock Holmes fans and newcomer to the party!!! I did listen to the audio-book, very good indeed.. Great job by the narrator.. The story itself includes a goose and a stolen carbuncle found in his crop. Also a Christmas setting and the Victorian flair and atmosphere Another great adventure and mystery.. Only Arthur Conan Doyle writes such fluently and gripping detective stories.. The immortal classic series still works for me!! "The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle" does not fail to satisfy both Sherlock Holmes fans and newcomer to the party!!! I did listen to the audio-book, very good indeed.. Great job by the narrator.. The story itself includes a goose and a stolen carbuncle found in his crop. Also a Christmas setting and the Victorian flair and atmosphere rounds up the show!! Well, three good stars and an Hurray for Sherlock and its wits!!! If you are fond of short stories and likes the Victorian era, then go for it!! Dean;)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Maram

    Cant say I liked it, since my childhood I ABSOLUTELY hated Sherlock Holmes and found him arrogant and annoying, never enjoyed the structure and flow of the stories. I guess I listened to this book without my past biases but still didnt enjoy it much.. Can’t say I liked it, since my childhood I ABSOLUTELY hated Sherlock Holmes and found him arrogant and annoying, never enjoyed the structure and flow of the stories. I guess I listened to this book without my past biases but still didn’t enjoy it much..

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cora Tea Party Princess

    5 Words: Perfect length for a pint. Ooh what a fantastic combination! Sherlock Holmes + Christmas... Who knew he had a heart? I really really enjoyed this one!

  16. 4 out of 5

    frannie pan

    It is the forgiving season indeed!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    Not the most interesting S.H story but it demonstrates his powerful observation and deduction abilities in the best way

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    I reread this on Christmas Eve and was amused by Holmes yet again...and nonplussed at his choice at the end of the mystery. I'd totally forgotten that this was one of the instances where he just...lets the criminals go free. And what happens to the blue carbuncle in the end? Last I saw it, Holmes still had it!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cáitín

    One of the best stories to read at Christmas Time and I have read it a number of times. We find Holmes at his best with a twist of humor, it all starts with a goose and what it has.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Suad Alhalwachi

    Another great little novella of Sherlock Holmes, what would he say now about climate change and who is the reason its happening? What would he say about the rubbish deep in the ocean? I have lots of unanswered questions that only Holmes with his wits can investigate. The story started with a hat and a goose and ended by finding a jewel and the person that made the goose swallows it, Holmes fascinating ways have always proved to be a success in entangling the mystery of any event. I just love Another great little novella of Sherlock Holmes, what would he say now about climate change and who is the reason it’s happening? What would he say about the rubbish deep in the ocean? I have lots of unanswered questions that only Holmes with his wits can investigate. The story started with a hat and a goose and ended by finding a jewel and the person that made the goose swallows it, Holmes fascinating ways have always proved to be a success in entangling the mystery of any event. I just love this man. Great to read P.s I wish to see the jewel. I am sure it’s a great find.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Albus Eugene Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore

    My name is Sherlock Holmes. It is my business to know what other people do not know

  22. 5 out of 5

    Irene McHugh

    While this adventure may not have as many twists as many other Homes and Watson stories, I do like the overall holiday message. If you're looking for a Christmas story that has not been overdone by the media, then this freebie for Audible members is worth listening to. My favorite parts are the analysis of the hat and the final whodunnit with the "What are we going to do about it?" piece. Cummings does a fantastic job reading this story. I felt like he flawlessly transformed himself into all of While this adventure may not have as many twists as many other Homes and Watson stories, I do like the overall holiday message. If you're looking for a Christmas story that has not been overdone by the media, then this freebie for Audible members is worth listening to. My favorite parts are the analysis of the hat and the final whodunnit with the "What are we going to do about it?" piece. Cummings does a fantastic job reading this story. I felt like he flawlessly transformed himself into all of these distinct characters. I've read this story a few times, but hearing Cummings narrate made me reflect upon the character of Breckinridge. I usually pass him off as a puffy, bit of a bully comic character with necessary information. This reading made me feel a little sorry for Breckinridge. People bothering him and he just wants to make his Christmas sales. And, of course, Cummings' reading of Holmes and Watson is perfect.

  23. 4 out of 5

    D.G.

    Just OK - I confess I'm not a fan of Sherlock Holmes in the books (love the series though!) Alan Cumming gives great panache to the narration but his voices for Holmes & Watson sounded a bit alike. Well, at least it's out of my TBR. :)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Selah Pike

    A Christmas must read!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brian Eshleman

    Impossible to solve ahead of Holmes unless you are immersed in things Victorian, but a jewel of a story anyway.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robin Hatcher

    Light and fun. Well-narrated in the audio version.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Allie (alliecatreads)

    I absolutely flew through this one! I don't think this one was as interesting as the other Sherlock Holmes stories I have read, but it was definitely a quick read that went in a little bit of a different direction. I definitely noticed the friendship between Watson and Sherlock to develop a little bit more into the mentor/mentee relationship, and we talked about one quality of Sherlock Holmes that is apparent in nearly all of his stories. He is always very sympathetic with the perpetrator, and I absolutely flew through this one! I don't think this one was as interesting as the other Sherlock Holmes stories I have read, but it was definitely a quick read that went in a little bit of a different direction. I definitely noticed the friendship between Watson and Sherlock to develop a little bit more into the mentor/mentee relationship, and we talked about one quality of Sherlock Holmes that is apparent in nearly all of his stories. He is always very sympathetic with the perpetrator, and this story was no different. It was definitely apparent how he was sympathizing with the person, and I just think that says something about Sherlock himself. Really enjoyed this one!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    A light Christmas mystery with a sweet message. I'm not always a huge Holmes fan, but I liked his style of detection in this story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aoife Katie

    I really enjoyed this short story and will be reading some more Sherlock Holmes short stories.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily Quinny

    My first audiobook...cant decide if I like them or not but this story was alright My first audiobook...can’t decide if I like them or not but this story was alright

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