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Dorothy And The Wizard In OZ: By L. Frank Baum - Illustrated

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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz is the fourth book set in the Land of Oz written by L. Frank Baum and How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz is the fourth book set in the Land of Oz written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by John R. Neill. It was published on June 18, 1908 and reunites Dorothy with the humbug Wizard from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. This is one of only two of the original fourteen Oz books (the other being The Emerald City of Oz) to be illustrated with watercolor paintings.


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How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz is the fourth book set in the Land of Oz written by L. Frank Baum and How is this book unique? Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Short Biography is also included 15 Illustrations are included One of the best books to read Best fiction books of all time Bestselling Novel Classic historical fiction books Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz is the fourth book set in the Land of Oz written by L. Frank Baum and illustrated by John R. Neill. It was published on June 18, 1908 and reunites Dorothy with the humbug Wizard from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. This is one of only two of the original fourteen Oz books (the other being The Emerald City of Oz) to be illustrated with watercolor paintings.

30 review for Dorothy And The Wizard In OZ: By L. Frank Baum - Illustrated

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Would I spoil things if I mention something that implied in the title? Yes, Dorothy got to Oz eventually, but it took her about two thirds of the book to finally arrive there. This time she was minding her own business riding from a train station to a Californian ranch where her uncle was waiting for her when she fell into a deep crack appearing as a result of an earthquake. She was shortly joined none other than the former Wizard of Oz himself. Trying to get to the surface they met a lot of Would I spoil things if I mention something that implied in the title? Yes, Dorothy got to Oz eventually, but it took her about two thirds of the book to finally arrive there. This time she was minding her own business riding from a train station to a Californian ranch where her uncle was waiting for her when she fell into a deep crack appearing as a result of an earthquake. She was shortly joined none other than the former Wizard of Oz himself. Trying to get to the surface they met a lot of fascinating magical creatures and places. In case anybody still have any doubts about the strength of L. Frank Baum's imagination, look no further than this book. The places and creatures I mentioned are very unusual and mostly great. On the negative side Dorothy's awful accent I was complaining about in the review of the previous book is back, but luckily this time it is much milder. Another negative part is that I feel the last several chapters were overly drawn and at least one of them (the whole court proceedings) was unnecessary. It is more like a social commentary which is out of place in a pure children book. Before I began writing my review I decided to see what other people have to say about the novel; it was a very bad idea. People complain about racism based on the fact that not all creatures Dorothy met were friendly. People complain about sexism based on the fact that Dorothy did not try to play Terminator (T-1000 model) to get her group out of tight spots. I am surprised I could not find complaints about author not including a token homosexual character. May I remind all the book was written more than one hundred years ago? My only wish would be for complainers to grow up as they look like children throwing a tantrum. So in the conclusion the great imagination slightly marred by unnecessary drawn final part gives 3 stars as the final rating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Not my favorite Oz book. It just reads as a series of unrelated episodes as Dorothy and her companions stumble along under the earth trying to find their way to the surface again. There's the land of vegetable people and the land of creatures made out of wood and the land of invisible people, etc. None of the lands yielded any characters with real staying power. And the inconsistencies make me wonder if Mr. Baum ever re-read his own books. In Ozma of Oz, Dorothy and Ozma arranged that Ozma would Not my favorite Oz book. It just reads as a series of unrelated episodes as Dorothy and her companions stumble along under the earth trying to find their way to the surface again. There's the land of vegetable people and the land of creatures made out of wood and the land of invisible people, etc. None of the lands yielded any characters with real staying power. And the inconsistencies make me wonder if Mr. Baum ever re-read his own books. In Ozma of Oz, Dorothy and Ozma arranged that Ozma would look in her magic mirror every Saturday morning at 10:00 (my 8yo son remembered that detail specifically!) and if Dorothy made a certain sign, Ozma would wish her to Oz. In this book all of a sudden, the arrangement was every day at 4:00. Besides, if Ozma checked in on her every day at 4:00, why on earth hadn't she made the sign earlier and why didn't any of her companions ask her that when she finally told them about it?!?! Also, I swear that in The Land of Oz right before bringing the Sawhorse to life, Tip was explaining the difference between sawhorses and real horses to Jack Pumpkinhead. But how would Tip of known anything about real horses if, as it states in this book, there are no real horses in Oz?!?! And that weird trial for Eureka at the end of the book was just...odd... Can't say I really care much for this Oz book at all. For more book reviews, come visit my blog, Build Enough Bookshelves.

  3. 5 out of 5

    あきこ (MIA, for now, but well wishes to all of my GR friends!!)

    Dorothy is supposed to be meeting up with her uncle in California to visit family. She meets Zeb instead (her cousin), and the two of them, along with their pets (a horse and a cat), go for an adventure together because there is an earthquake and they fall through the earth. Mangaboos (vegetable people), self growing glass cities, lack of gravity, invisible people, cloud fairies, wooden gargoyles, dragons, etc.. Old friends are in this one too, and many new characters. There is some reverse Dorothy is supposed to be meeting up with her uncle in California to visit family. She meets Zeb instead (her cousin), and the two of them, along with their pets (a horse and a cat), go for an adventure together because there is an earthquake and they fall through the earth. Mangaboos (vegetable people), self growing glass cities, lack of gravity, invisible people, cloud fairies, wooden gargoyles, dragons, etc.. Old friends are in this one too, and many new characters. There is some reverse psychology going on in this story, IMO. The vegetable people are not so kind, was this a ploy to make kids want to eat their vegetables (want what you shouldn't want)? Anyway, this story could be great for kids, but it was not my favorite of the series. The point of this story seemed to be a foundation story, new character introductions, and worlds surrounding Oz introductions for future books in the series. There was mini drama within each new world the characters walked into, but there was no real overarching story other than that some of the characters wanted to make it back to the top of Earth. I will read the next in the series, but I hope it has a more defined story line with a purpose.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Please note that this book will spoil events from books one through three. So if you haven't read those books, skip over this review. My general feeling once I finished this book was eh. I feel bad for saying this, but the charm of the first two Oz books has worn off of me. I had issues with book three but this one really did not gel for me at all. Maybe it's because two new characters sucked. A lot. And I was glad to be rid of them. Yes. I am totally calling out a children's book right now Please note that this book will spoil events from books one through three. So if you haven't read those books, skip over this review. My general feeling once I finished this book was eh. I feel bad for saying this, but the charm of the first two Oz books has worn off of me. I had issues with book three but this one really did not gel for me at all. Maybe it's because two new characters sucked. A lot. And I was glad to be rid of them. Yes. I am totally calling out a children's book right now for being just an okay read. First we have Dorothy still running around like a mini-tyrant. I think her bossy nature got a bit grating in this one for me. We also have Dorothy running back into the hum-bug The Wizard. I feel like everyone had amnesia from book three onward since everyone just ignores the fact that the Wizard kidnapped Princess Ozma when she was a baby and gave her to the witch Mombi. Why does everyone just forget that fact? Instead The Wizard is still seen as this great powerful person who actually just knows magic tricks and is no more magical than an empty water bottle. I was sick of The Wizard at the end of this book. Except for Zeb, the other two new characters, Jim and Eureka were plenty awful. At one point we actually get a trial scene with Eureka being accused of something monstrous and Eureka was just like: "oh who cares?" Jim was just nasty and awful to my favorite character Saw-Horse and I was never so happy when he got the paw-down from The Hungry Tiger. The main plot of Dorothy and crew trying to find their way out of the constant jams they find themselves in really make no sense since we realize from book three she already has a way to get out of trouble. The fact that it took Dorothy so long to remember she had a way to get everyone to Oz safely just made me shake my head. I realized the other day that Dorothy is a straight up TSTL heroine in these books, and it makes me sad. Additionally, I feel like Ozma has been regulated to just being the most beautiful ruler ever and not really thought of as being smart either. The other characters really don't grab me, and the entire Land of Oz seems to be run by really attractive and not terribly intelligent people. Usually I found myself enchanted with the other creatures, characters, and settings that L. Frank Baum writes in these books. I mean we meet an entire land that is made of glass. The people are actually walking talking vegetables. I felt nothing. Instead this time I found myself getting bored of it about halfway through. We travel to a land where eating a certain fruit makes you invisible. I shrugged. I had plans to try to finish all 14 Oz books, but I think I will pass.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    The author says in the foreword to this book that he tried to fit as many of his fans' suggestions into the book as possible and I can well believe it as the book feels a bit like a box-ticking exercise sometimes, particularly near the end. (Man, what an awful sentence! Never mind; I'm too tired to change it.) I still enjoyed the book a great deal, though. I've come to realise I'm picturing the characters as drawn by Skottie Young in Marvel's comicbook adaptations of this series. No bad thing, I The author says in the foreword to this book that he tried to fit as many of his fans' suggestions into the book as possible and I can well believe it as the book feels a bit like a box-ticking exercise sometimes, particularly near the end. (Man, what an awful sentence! Never mind; I'm too tired to change it.) I still enjoyed the book a great deal, though. I've come to realise I'm picturing the characters as drawn by Skottie Young in Marvel's comicbook adaptations of this series. No bad thing, I suppose...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara Santos

    4,5 Such a delightful and marvellous book!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Yet another series that I read lots in my youth, and thus retain a fondness for, despite recognizing that Baum is only a middling writer, at best. His inventiveness, which is his greatest strength, often gets out of hand and doesn't lend itself to satisfying narratives with a beginning, middle, and end. And don't even get me started on the inconsistencies... But every now and then, he gets off a really good line: "H.M.," said the Woggle-Bug, pompously, "means Highly Magnified; and T.E. means Yet another series that I read lots in my youth, and thus retain a fondness for, despite recognizing that Baum is only a middling writer, at best. His inventiveness, which is his greatest strength, often gets out of hand and doesn't lend itself to satisfying narratives with a beginning, middle, and end. And don't even get me started on the inconsistencies... But every now and then, he gets off a really good line: "H.M.," said the Woggle-Bug, pompously, "means Highly Magnified; and T.E. means Thoroughly Educated. I am, in reality, a very big bug, and doubtless the most intelligent being in all this broad domain." "How well you disguise it," said the Wizard. My son, currently 8, is enjoying Oz; I believe we may end up going through the whole series. This makes me groan, just slightly, thinking of all the number of times old friends are going to greet each other warmly (more and more of them in each successive book) when they are reunited, usually in the Emerald City after all the good parts of the story are over. But I think I'll enjoy revisiting Rinkitink in Oz, and Glinda of Oz, both of which I remember as being particularly engrossing to ten-year-old me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    TJ✨

    So im reading all the Oz books plus the side books, but feeling a little sick so review to come when i'm feeling better

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    This is one of my favorite of the Oz books. The the California earthquake that drops Dorothy and Zeb into the earth, the organically grown glass buildings, the vegetable people, the little old man living on a stair landing halfway up the mountain who makes rustles (for silk dresses), flutters (for flags), and high-quality holes (for, I don't know flagpoles?), the wooden gargoyles, the dragonettes with their tails tied to rocks, the trial of Eureka the kitten for murder of a piglet... it's all so This is one of my favorite of the Oz books. The the California earthquake that drops Dorothy and Zeb into the earth, the organically grown glass buildings, the vegetable people, the little old man living on a stair landing halfway up the mountain who makes rustles (for silk dresses), flutters (for flags), and high-quality holes (for, I don't know flagpoles?), the wooden gargoyles, the dragonettes with their tails tied to rocks, the trial of Eureka the kitten for murder of a piglet... it's all so delightfully zany and creative and just plain fun.

  10. 4 out of 5

    J.M. Hushour

    #4 in the original Baum Oz continuum and you can tell by this point that he was getting a little winded. The whole work comes across as a pandering to his pesky fans who kept demanding new works (he published one a year, it seems like) and is pretty sloppy. Dorothy and some redneck kid fall through a crack in the earth during an earthquake in California and, after randomly finding the original Wizard of Oz in an underground city made of glass, they have a series of unconnected, sometimes #4 in the original Baum Oz continuum and you can tell by this point that he was getting a little winded. The whole work comes across as a pandering to his pesky fans who kept demanding new works (he published one a year, it seems like) and is pretty sloppy. Dorothy and some redneck kid fall through a crack in the earth during an earthquake in California and, after randomly finding the original Wizard of Oz in an underground city made of glass, they have a series of unconnected, sometimes unremarkable adventures through the center of the Earth. Some of these bits are okay: the vegetable people and the city of glass are kind of creepy, the dragons and gargoyles are far less successful and the whole thing seems to lack the pithy, folksy charm of the other works. Dorothy and Zeb are just reduced to agape, worthless children, passive enochs to the panoply of insanity unfolding before them. The whole stupid thing ends up with them back in Oz, their asses saved by Ozma and her magical corset or whatever, at the last minute. After that there's a meaningless series of events that have even less to do with the work as a whole as everything that came before it. Again, has some good moments, but overall not what I'd call Ozsome...hahahaha....get it? Oz-some? Like awesome? Shut up.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Another enjoyable installation in the Oz series. These are such fun quick reads!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Originally published in 1908, this fourth Oz novel sees Kansas farm-girl Dorothy Gale once again transported to magical lands, this time thanks to a California earthquake, during which our heroine falls into the depths of the earth, together with a boy name Zeb, his carriage-horse Jim, and Dorothy's mischievous kitten, Eureka. Far underground, in the strange land of the Mangaboos - heartless root-people who grows on bushes - Dorothy and Co. meet up with the Wizard (that is to say, the original Originally published in 1908, this fourth Oz novel sees Kansas farm-girl Dorothy Gale once again transported to magical lands, this time thanks to a California earthquake, during which our heroine falls into the depths of the earth, together with a boy name Zeb, his carriage-horse Jim, and Dorothy's mischievous kitten, Eureka. Far underground, in the strange land of the Mangaboos - heartless root-people who grows on bushes - Dorothy and Co. meet up with the Wizard (that is to say, the original Wizard from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz ), who has also fallen into the earth. Together the companions face many dangers, from the xenophobic Mangaboos to the ferocious invisible bears of the Valley of Voe, on their long journey back to the surface of the earth. Eventually, after confronting a cave full of dragonettes, the travelers are rescued by Ozma of Oz, who transports them to the Emerald City. Here Dorothy and Wizard meet many old friends, while Eureka meets trouble... I was struck, reading Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, by the many stratagems that Baum must employ in these early Oz books, to transport his heroine to that magical land. In the first, she is whisked away by a cyclone, in the third she is washed overboard in a terrible storm, and here she falls into the earth during an earthquake! Eventually the borders of Oz are closed (I forget in which title this occurs), but until that point the author must contend with the question of how to reunite his characters. The result, I am finding, is that a great deal of the action of the story takes place outside of Oz. However that may be, I enjoyed my reread of this installment of the series, although sometimes Dorothy's "adorable" little-girl accent grated a bit - I don't recall her speaking this way in the original...? - and I could have lived without the trial of Eureka, at the close of the book. Still, I was entertained to meet the Wizard again, and look forward to my reread of the fifth Oz novel, The Road to Oz .

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shoshana

    I really like this one. Baum is sometimes hit-or-miss with how interesting the different kinds of people his characters are constantly meeting are (good sentence, Sho), but he is pretty hit in Dorothy and the Wizard. The Mangaboos, the Valley of Vo, the dragonets, and the gargoyles are all neat, although I wish the dragon herself played a bigger role, and I wish we learned more about how the gargoyles came to be and why they fight and imprison all comers, and what they would have done with our I really like this one. Baum is sometimes hit-or-miss with how interesting the different kinds of people his characters are constantly meeting are (good sentence, Sho), but he is pretty hit in Dorothy and the Wizard. The Mangaboos, the Valley of Vo, the dragonets, and the gargoyles are all neat, although I wish the dragon herself played a bigger role, and I wish we learned more about how the gargoyles came to be and why they fight and imprison all comers, and what they would have done with our friends when they were prisoners. Anyway, Baum's weird occasional moments of retro-sexism are back, as when Dorothy, Zeb, and their horse and buggy are falling through an earthquake-created giant chasm in the earth and Dorothy loses consciousness whereas "Zeb, being a boy, did not faint." What? He's a boy, so his brain doesn't have coping mechanisms for shock? I mean, what? On the other hand, Dorothy is still her bizarrely (and awesomely) unflappable self. Once she regains consciousness, she stares around her at the chasm through which they are still falling, and then she "sighed and commenced to breathe easier." She then proceeds to basically coach Zeb through the whole beginning of the adventure as they approach and explore the land of the Mangaboos, laughing at stuff that frightens him, encouraging him to try walking through the air, and generally sharing intrepidity with all she meets. I particularly like the part where she reassures Zeb that they're not in any danger because they are falling so slowly, he responds by saying "We'll never get home again, though!" and she tells him not to worry about things he can't help. "The boy became silent, having no reply to so sensible a speech." Go, D! We also have a characteristic Baum-style inconsistency (well, a couple, probably, but one that I particularly noticed). When the Wizard finally meets Ozma, she explains to him that Mombi was her grandfather's jailor and her father's jailor and that when Ozma was born Mombi transformed her into a boy. But in The Land of Oz, Mombi says truthfully that the Wizard brought her baby Ozma and "begged [her] to conceal the child"! I mean, this is a change that makes sense - as it shows the Wizard in a pretty villainous light, and by this point in the series he is really supposed to have grown on us - but it's a pretty dramatic and unacknowledged revision! Another discrepancy that's actually relevant to the storytelling is that in Ozma of Oz, Dorothy and Ozma agree that Ozma will check on Dorothy every Saturday at a certain time to see if she wants to come to Oz; in Dorothy and the Wizard, Dorothy says that Ozma checks on her every day at four. In which case, why in this book and the next and the next doesn't that ever happen? I think the weekly check-in would explain why they go through so many truly dangerous situations without rescue. But whatevs! I'm glad for my own sake that they have so many adventures, because I enjoy them so thoroughly!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nostalgia Reader

    2.5 stars This one was quite slow and a very skipable installment. There was no quest, just Dorothy and friends trying to find their way back to Earth. And the means to get there ended up being quite anticlimactic, especially since Dorothy could have used her connection with Ozma at any point in their journey. The animal characters, Eureka and Jim, were both annoying, although the little piglets were quite adorable. There also seemed to be some alternate history introduced here, edited from the 2.5 stars This one was quite slow and a very skipable installment. There was no quest, just Dorothy and friends trying to find their way back to Earth. And the means to get there ended up being quite anticlimactic, especially since Dorothy could have used her connection with Ozma at any point in their journey. The animal characters, Eureka and Jim, were both annoying, although the little piglets were quite adorable. There also seemed to be some alternate history introduced here, edited from the history we got in Marvelous Land. I didn't mind it too much, but it is confusing to have it changed... fortunately, I have a collection of the stories, so I could easily look back and see what was changed.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Sprunger

    I've never considered Dorothy and The Wizard in Oz a particularly good installment in the Oz saga. As the author admits in his introduction, Dorothy and The Wizard was written as a concession to the numerous fan letters appealing to keep Dorothy and the Wizard bound together as a fixture in the ongoing stories of Oz. As only the fourth book - well before the full cast of characters and the complete dimensions of Oz itself were defined - Dorothy and The Wizard doesn't actually go anywhere. I've never considered Dorothy and The Wizard in Oz a particularly good installment in the Oz saga. As the author admits in his introduction, Dorothy and The Wizard was written as a concession to the numerous fan letters appealing to keep Dorothy and the Wizard bound together as a fixture in the ongoing stories of Oz. As only the fourth book - well before the full cast of characters and the complete dimensions of Oz itself were defined - Dorothy and The Wizard doesn't actually go anywhere. Apparently, Baum condescended to surlily give his audience what they asked for, but didn't feel his commitment to his fans necessitated a carefully crafted story. Dorothy and The Wizard feels like a cranky "screw you" aimed at little kids who shouldn't be blamed for wanting more of a story they love than today's kids can be faulted for wanting their Mario Bros. or Batman content to stay current. Taking this as a document, one can only imagine L. Frank Baum in 1908 as a bitter, sad, little man. I wouldn't have re-read Dorothy and The Wizard at all on my own under ordinary circumstances; I already prepossessed the impressions laid out in the preceding paragraph before re-reading the story today. It's only because of Dorothy and The Wizard's recent adaptation by Marvel comics and the subject of my family's inaugural family "reading circle" that I revisited it at all.* Dorothy and The Wizard sucks at being an Oz book: (A) It isn't even set in Oz, for Christ's sake. (B) Baum's moral inconsistency/ambivalence is on full display. Conflict is created as a result of characters' uncouthness (the Wizard's first line, go-to solution for most problems is genocide), when conflict need not even exist. The actual structured world of Oz, once the characters actually arrive there (in the last 20% of the book) is anti-democratic and anti-humanist. The only enduring parts of Dorothy and The Wizard come near the very end, in the form of two vignettes tacked on as an afterthought. The race between Jim the horse and the Sawhorse asks quality questions about the value of being real (or fallible) versus engineered (or perfect) - essential early 20th century existentialism. The trial of Eureka the cat may be a shining point in the early Oz books - but it's hard to contextualize. I'm afraid the things that seem to be happening are the result of mistaken associations not contemporaneous to Baum's America - what we internally cross-reference when we read the Eureka trial come out of other things we know, from later material, not from turn of the century thinking. For example, Eureka's trial is as farcical as the show trial in Darkness at Noon or the Sacco and Vanzetti case - but Dorothy and The Wizard was written in 1908, so do the math... If Baum didn't display such overt anti-democratic tendencies, one might assume the trial in Dorothy and The Wizard was cautionary satire. But it's not. It's just an anomaly accidentally occurring in the middle of a squalid, serialized pablum with little (if anything) of value to say. I'm open to criticism for being too demanding of L. Frank Baum. He - after all - may or may not have submitted his stories for moral scrutiny. However, children (both yesterday and today) have nearly limitless literary options. I do not think I am wrong for calling attention to how poorly executed Baum's body of work actually is, despite the sentimental halation. *My son is learning to read. We're starting a "reading circle," hopefully to last for years, in which all three of us read together. Oz is a logical beginning because of the all-ages nature of the MGM film, the cultural necessity, and the tie-ins with targeted marketing, ranging from comic books to Happy Meal toys.

  16. 5 out of 5

    J. Boo

    After having read two Ozes recently that I'm almost certain I didn't read as a child, my impression that I had read through the entire series seems incorrect. Quick plot summary: Dorothy, a generic boy, and a horse are earthquaked from California into non-Ozian lands, where they meet again with the Wizard, and have some more-violent-than-I-remember-this-series-including adventures before winding up in Oz. Also, adorable piglets, who I can't recall showing up in any later books. (Not that I After having read two Ozes recently that I'm almost certain I didn't read as a child, my impression that I had read through the entire series seems incorrect. Quick plot summary: Dorothy, a generic boy, and a horse are earthquaked from California into non-Ozian lands, where they meet again with the Wizard, and have some more-violent-than-I-remember-this-series-including adventures before winding up in Oz. Also, adorable piglets, who I can't recall showing up in any later books. (Not that I necessarily would remember them after so many years...)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    A lot of super cool, imaginative ideas strung together by a thin plot. All of the favorite characters make it into the story by the end. Eh, my son enjoyed it. Fun fact, during a murder trial I got to explain both murder and trials...sweet.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stefani

    Kept falling asleep so not sure what I listened to. Must go back to it :/

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Reichenbaugh

    A slight dip in rating for the 4th Oz novel, wherein Dorothy and her cousin Zeb fall through a crack in the earth (thanks to an earthquake) and float into a strange land inhabited by vegetable people. Luckily for our heroes, the "great and terrible" wizard Oz from the first book also ends up in the Land of Mangaboos from which they must plot their escape to return to the Earth's surface. There is some further backstory on the Wizard Oz, and we learn his real name. It's not until the final few A slight dip in rating for the 4th Oz novel, wherein Dorothy and her cousin Zeb fall through a crack in the earth (thanks to an earthquake) and float into a strange land inhabited by vegetable people. Luckily for our heroes, the "great and terrible" wizard Oz from the first book also ends up in the Land of Mangaboos from which they must plot their escape to return to the Earth's surface. There is some further backstory on the Wizard Oz, and we learn his real name. It's not until the final few chapters that we actually end up in Oz again. Ozma, from the 3rd novel, is still ruler of Oz and still resides in the Emerald City. This is a more episodic novel than the first three books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    Had to delete the blog review because it kept showing a larger picture of the book. Being the perfectionist I am sometimes, I just deleted it because it was getting on my nerves and I couldn't figure out what was going on. lol I did enjoy the book, as I always do with the Oz books. Glad to be gradually working my way through these books. It was good to see many of the old characters from the first few books and of course some new ones. Hopefully I will be able to get a couple more finished Had to delete the blog review because it kept showing a larger picture of the book. Being the perfectionist I am sometimes, I just deleted it because it was getting on my nerves and I couldn't figure out what was going on. lol I did enjoy the book, as I always do with the Oz books. Glad to be gradually working my way through these books. It was good to see many of the old characters from the first few books and of course some new ones. Hopefully I will be able to get a couple more finished before the end of the year and can finally say I have a total of two bind ups/6 stories finished. (5 bind ups. 3 stories in each) :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tarissa

    How fun! Due to an earthquake, Dorothy (and friends) fall through a crack in the ground, and they fall deep into the earth's core. There she discovers new fairy lands for herself. Lots of intrigue in this Oz volume. Even gasp! an accusation of murder is rung out through the land of Oz. My, my! I also liked how a little bit more was explained about how Oz became the leader of the land, being history that not even Dorothy knew previously. How fun! Due to an earthquake, Dorothy (and friends) fall through a crack in the ground, and they fall deep into the earth's core. There she discovers new fairy lands for herself. Lots of intrigue in this Oz volume. Even – gasp! – an accusation of murder is rung out through the land of Oz. My, my! I also liked how a little bit more was explained about how Oz became the leader of the land, being history that not even Dorothy knew previously.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jody

    Another fun story, with all of the old favourites and a couple of new ones.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    My children love these books! Onto the next, I believe Patchwork Girl?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chandra

    3.5/5 stars. I am knocking off half a star because this is when the series starts to have inconsistencies (but they dont bother me much so I will only give this one demerit). Overall another silly and fun journey with Dorothy and friends. 3.5/5 stars. I am knocking off half a star because this is when the series starts to have inconsistencies (but they don’t bother me much so I will only give this one demerit). Overall another silly and fun journey with Dorothy and friends.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Illiterate

    Increasingly formulaic, repetitive, and lacking humor.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kaion

    Dorothy's traveling through San Francisco, when a earthquake occurs and she falls into the Earth. Once again, she's traveling through some dangerous magical lands, this time accompanied with her cat Eureka, her cousin Zeb, and his cab-horse Jim. I couldn't help notice that this is the first book of the series where Baum doesn't proclaim it to be the last Oz book ever in the introduction. I guess by this point Baum was resigned to the selling power of Oz, and it sort of shows in how much of Dorothy's traveling through San Francisco, when a earthquake occurs and she falls into the Earth. Once again, she's traveling through some dangerous magical lands, this time accompanied with her cat Eureka, her cousin Zeb, and his cab-horse Jim. I couldn't help notice that this is the first book of the series where Baum doesn't proclaim it to be the last Oz book ever in the introduction. I guess by this point Baum was resigned to the selling power of Oz, and it sort of shows in how much of Dorothy feels like him settling on a formula instead of the major tonal shifts he tried with Marvelous Land and Ozma (which made them back-to-back highs). I mean, what says more sequel fatigue than bringing back two favorite characters from previous books, and putting their names in the title! To be fair, Dorothy and the Wizard are the most interesting characters here: Dorothy her usual common-sense self and taking everything in stride (particularly now that fairy lands are basically normal to her now) and the Wizard managing halfway between magician and humbug. In contrast, Baum doesn't seem to be too interested in Zeb or Jim as characters, and Eureka while comically selfish, does pale in comparison to Billina and Toto. (Poor Zeb is the only human visitor in the Oz books who never gets a return, let's face it, because he's boring and he's a teenage boy). Despite the overall disappointing "plot", there's still a lot of Baum's trademark inventions on display. I don't think anyone who reads this can forget the land of the vegetable people (who gain consciousness when they're plucked full grown off the vine)—a rather unsettling passage enhanced by some wonderful line illustrations by John R. Neill. Or the land of the invisible people (who voluntary stay so to avoid being eaten by the invisible killer bears). Those are the kind of dark, weird one-off creatures that made the Oz books memorable, long past any generic stumbling-about storylines. Rating: 3.5 stars

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Not the The Wizard of Oz, but one of the sequels. Have you all ever read the Oz books? Because they are just plain odd. Baum was incredibly imaginative, and could dream up the most outlandish situations, for sure, but the books are a little bit crazy. Anyway, this one starts off in California, where earthquake causes Dorothy, her kitten, a boy named Zeb and a horse named Jim fall into the center of the earth. They land in a mysterious kingdom where they just happen to run into the Wizard (also Not the The Wizard of Oz, but one of the sequels. Have you all ever read the Oz books? Because they are just plain odd. Baum was incredibly imaginative, and could dream up the most outlandish situations, for sure, but the books are a little bit crazy. Anyway, this one starts off in California, where earthquake causes Dorothy, her kitten, a boy named Zeb and a horse named Jim fall into the center of the earth. They land in a mysterious kingdom where they just happen to run into the Wizard (also there through earthquake related injuries). The five of them (since the animals can all talk in a fairy kingdom) have adventures and escape until they get stuck in a cave somewhere. Luckily, Ozma of Oz sees them her magic mirror and deus ex machinas them to Oz, where they have more adventures (including the trial of a kitten that contained very little habeus corpus), and then they all are sent back to Earth except for the Wizard who has reformed and stays. Look, it reads better than it sounds. What really makes these books enchanting is the weird creatures Baum dreams up and, even better, the fabulous illustrations by John R. Neill. I thought I hadn’t read this book before, until I saw an illustration of the Wizard cutting a plant person in half with a sword, which was so evocative that I remembered the entire thing!! I many not be an Oz head (and if you don’t believe such things exist you are luckily naïve in the ways of the internet), but they are good clean fun, and with the illustrations, enchanting.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Ever day-dream about falling into a crack in the earth and finding strange communities of people living underground? Me neither! Nor did I ever imagine that I'd read about a kitty on trial for murder! This one is strictly for those who can approach it as a child . . . Sorry. I confess right up front that I'm being completely uncritical here. If I were critical about the preposterous concepts, the lack of development of the new worlds visited, the flake-outs of the continuity of the series, or Ever day-dream about falling into a crack in the earth and finding strange communities of people living underground? Me neither! Nor did I ever imagine that I'd read about a kitty on trial for murder! This one is strictly for those who can approach it as a child . . . Sorry. I confess right up front that I'm being completely uncritical here. If I were critical about the preposterous concepts, the lack of development of the new worlds visited, the flake-outs of the continuity of the series, or the shape of the plot, this one would not fare too well. Yet, I enjoyed it. I delighted in the wildly imaginative creatures, even if they were underdeveloped. I loved the unpredictability of what happens next and then what happens after that. Most of the book was a wacky "on the road" journey through cultures that exist underground. Near the end of the book, the cast arrives in Oz and has warm-fuzzy reunions with old friends-for the most part. Suffice it to say, some of the new members of the cast don't play well with others. Lastly there is court-room drama where a kitten is put on trial for murder. It's absurd, but if you can approach the book with the innocence of a child with wide surprised eyes, it's fun!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Louise-Andree

    3* Misleading title as 3/4 of the book doesn't actually happen in Oz and once they get there it's actually to go back home. Vegetable people, invisible people, rain of rocks, ... and I am also left wondering what the plot of this book is, aside from finding a way back to the surface of the earth after falling through a crack made by an earthquake. I find that most of the books read of Oz so far and rarely plot based but you get adventures in the meantime and you get to meet a lot of varied cities 3* Misleading title as 3/4 of the book doesn't actually happen in Oz and once they get there it's actually to go back home. Vegetable people, invisible people, rain of rocks, ... and I am also left wondering what the plot of this book is, aside from finding a way back to the surface of the earth after falling through a crack made by an earthquake. I find that most of the books read of Oz so far and rarely plot based but you get adventures in the meantime and you get to meet a lot of varied cities and people and creatures and this leads me back to saying that the author's imagination is amazing but I also feel like there were too many different things here to fit in one book. I felt lost in a bunch of places and found myself wondering "wth?" many times. Also, the tale of the wizard finding his way back in the earth through the earthquake's crack on board of his hot air balloon... how far fetched is that? I mean, that's pushing it very very very very far. Let's not talk about continuity errors between Ozma and Dorothy and the time to look for Dorothy's sign to bring her back to Oz... Anyway, it is my lowest of the books read so far but I still give it 3 because of the imagination.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elderberrywine

    Sooooo - Dorothy, the Wizard, and friends fall into the center of the Earth during an earthquake (this was written two years after the Big One in San Fransisco BTW), where it is oddly not particularly hot, but full of lands populated with all sorts of Odd Beings. They manage, after two thirds of the book, to get within a stone wall of the Earth's surface, only to be trapped in a cave with no outlet. But wait! Ozma and Dorothy had an agreement that Ozma would check Dorothy's whereabouts every Sooooo - Dorothy, the Wizard, and friends fall into the center of the Earth during an earthquake (this was written two years after the Big One in San Fransisco BTW), where it is oddly not particularly hot, but full of lands populated with all sorts of Odd Beings. They manage, after two thirds of the book, to get within a stone wall of the Earth's surface, only to be trapped in a cave with no outlet. But wait! Ozma and Dorothy had an agreement that Ozma would check Dorothy's whereabouts every afternoon at four and if Dorothy was ever in trouble, all she had to give the secret sign (crossed fingers!), and wham! There she'd be in Oz! So of course, she does, and is, and thus the book ends. Leaving, of course, the reader (and doubtless Dorothy's friends) to wonder why she never thought to mention this little ace up her sleeve before. Ah, well, with Oz it's not so much the journey as who you meet along the way, and the Nine Tiny Piglets were adorable.

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