Hot Best Seller

Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World

Availability: Ready to download

How do you get to what's real?Your organization's culture is the key to its success. Strategic planning is essential. People's competencies should be measured and their weaknesses shored up. People crave feedback.These may sound like basic truths of our work lives today. But actually, they're lies. As strengths guru and bestselling author Marcus Buckingham and Cisco Leader How do you get to what's real?Your organization's culture is the key to its success. Strategic planning is essential. People's competencies should be measured and their weaknesses shored up. People crave feedback.These may sound like basic truths of our work lives today. But actually, they're lies. As strengths guru and bestselling author Marcus Buckingham and Cisco Leadership and Team Intelligence head Ashley Goodall show in this provocative, inspiring book, there are some big lies--distortions, faulty assumptions, wrong thinking--running through our organizational lives. Nine lies, to be exact. They cause dysfunction and frustration and ultimately result in a strange feeling of unreality that pervades our workplaces.But there are those who can get past the lies and discover what's real. These are freethinking leaders who recognize the power and beauty of our individual uniqueness, who know that emergent patterns are more valuable than received wisdom, and that evidence is more powerful than dogma. With engaging stories and incisive analysis, the authors reveal the essential truths that such freethinking leaders will recognize immediately: that it is the strength and cohesiveness of your team, not your company's culture, that matters most; that we need less focus on top-down planning and more on giving our people reliable, real-time intelligence; that rather than trying to align people's goals we should strive to align people's sense of purpose and meaning; that people don't want constant feedback, they want helpful attention. This is the real world of work.If you embrace each person's uniqueness and see this as key for all healthy organizations; if you reject dogma and engage with the real world; if you seek out emergent patterns and put your faith in evidence, not philosophy; if you thrill to the power of teams--if you do all of these, then you are a freethinking leader, and this book is for you.


Compare

How do you get to what's real?Your organization's culture is the key to its success. Strategic planning is essential. People's competencies should be measured and their weaknesses shored up. People crave feedback.These may sound like basic truths of our work lives today. But actually, they're lies. As strengths guru and bestselling author Marcus Buckingham and Cisco Leader How do you get to what's real?Your organization's culture is the key to its success. Strategic planning is essential. People's competencies should be measured and their weaknesses shored up. People crave feedback.These may sound like basic truths of our work lives today. But actually, they're lies. As strengths guru and bestselling author Marcus Buckingham and Cisco Leadership and Team Intelligence head Ashley Goodall show in this provocative, inspiring book, there are some big lies--distortions, faulty assumptions, wrong thinking--running through our organizational lives. Nine lies, to be exact. They cause dysfunction and frustration and ultimately result in a strange feeling of unreality that pervades our workplaces.But there are those who can get past the lies and discover what's real. These are freethinking leaders who recognize the power and beauty of our individual uniqueness, who know that emergent patterns are more valuable than received wisdom, and that evidence is more powerful than dogma. With engaging stories and incisive analysis, the authors reveal the essential truths that such freethinking leaders will recognize immediately: that it is the strength and cohesiveness of your team, not your company's culture, that matters most; that we need less focus on top-down planning and more on giving our people reliable, real-time intelligence; that rather than trying to align people's goals we should strive to align people's sense of purpose and meaning; that people don't want constant feedback, they want helpful attention. This is the real world of work.If you embrace each person's uniqueness and see this as key for all healthy organizations; if you reject dogma and engage with the real world; if you seek out emergent patterns and put your faith in evidence, not philosophy; if you thrill to the power of teams--if you do all of these, then you are a freethinking leader, and this book is for you.

30 review for Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Karren Hodgkins

    This book speaks to me on so many levels: as someone who worked in an International corporate environment for more than 15 years and as someone who has her own business and interacts with privately-owned businesses on a daily basis. These practices make so much sense to me and I encourage all to read this book, both leaders and followers. It’s a paradigm-shifting book that outlines exactly what we can do to improve our businesses’ performance and the lives of those who work there. Businesses who This book speaks to me on so many levels: as someone who worked in an International corporate environment for more than 15 years and as someone who has her own business and interacts with privately-owned businesses on a daily basis. These practices make so much sense to me and I encourage all to read this book, both leaders and followers. It’s a paradigm-shifting book that outlines exactly what we can do to improve our businesses’ performance and the lives of those who work there. Businesses who make these changes have just got to be the best places to work. They will be the ones that talented individuals will choose to work for. The book addresses generally accepted approaches within many companies and the authors heap up the evidence to contradict each of these, ie: they address the “Nine Lies”. Key outtakes for me: * It’s the team we are a part of, not the company we work for that matters. The role of the team leader is the most important role in any company. (So best we pay attention to the quality of our team leaders) * The people who use the information are in the best position to make sense of it, with smaller, integrated efforts, (which are adjusted as a result of the intelligence gathered) being the way to go. Regular check-ins with team members are essential to retaining (increasing) their engagement * We need to set our own goals for them to have any value, goals cannot be imposed on us by others. Shared meaning and purpose can be cascaded down to create alignment but we need a,“ detailed understanding of the purpose of our work and the values we should honour in deciding how to get it done.” Leaders need to expound the WHY, then the individuals can tussle with the WHAT * Excellent performance depends on our working with our strengths daily, not on our being well-rounded. It’s the single most powerful predictor of a team’s productivity. High performers leverage their strengths and work out how to increase the impact of what they do where they already have an ability * People need to know we genuinely care about them. “Positive attention... is thirty times more powerful than negative attention in creating high performance on a team.” “If you want your people to learn more, pay attention to what’s working for them right now, and then build on that.” * We are not able to objectively assess the performance of an individual by scoring them, or their overall potential. Rather we should look to understand how a team leader reacts to the team member; how he/she feels. * We need to discuss human growth and the careers our people aspire to, and how we can help them build those careers, we can’t’ ignore who they are and their needs * “Love-in-work matters most”, ie: finding love in what we do is really important and is a critical part of what makes each one of us unique. We then need to bring this strength to our team * A leader is only a leader if they have followers. “The only determinant of whether anyone is leading is whether anyone is following’” Followership can be measured, leadership can’t. I just loved these quotes: “A leader who embraces a world in which the weird uniqueness of each individual is seen not as a flaw to be ground down but as a mess worth engaging with, the raw material for all healthy, ethical, thriving organisations: a leader who rejects dogma and instead seeks out evidence….” “... leaders cannot be in the control business and must be in the intelligence, meaning and empowerment business---- the outcomes business.” I thoroughly enjoyed this book and will reference it going forward. It’s well written with many stories to help the reader understand the principles and with detailed research supporting the arguments. With many thanks to the authors, the publishers, Harvard Business Review Press. and NetGalley for my free copy to review

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott Wozniak

    I love how this book stretches our thinking and pushes us past the standard HR/Talent Development methods. I really, really love how it uses logic and research to point out the gaps in the existing approaches. But I'm bummed about how they overreact on the solution. They get caught up in their rhetoric and throw about the baby with the bathwater. Example, leadership is hard to define and many of our great leaders didn't have all the traits we would say a good leader has--so, they say, there must I love how this book stretches our thinking and pushes us past the standard HR/Talent Development methods. I really, really love how it uses logic and research to point out the gaps in the existing approaches. But I'm bummed about how they overreact on the solution. They get caught up in their rhetoric and throw about the baby with the bathwater. Example, leadership is hard to define and many of our great leaders didn't have all the traits we would say a good leader has--so, they say, there must not be any way to define leadership at all. So, read this book to stretch your thinking--and then ignore most of the recommendations they have for fixing the holes in the systems.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brian Kramp

    This is a well-written book by an author whose work I've read before. First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently is on my favorites list. The following are my notes: 1. People care which company team they work for. Because that's where work actually happens. 2. The best plan intelligence wins. Because the world moves too fast for plans. 3. The best companies cascade goals meaning. Because that's what they all share. 4. The best people are well-rounded spiky. Bec This is a well-written book by an author whose work I've read before. First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently is on my favorites list. The following are my notes: 1. People care which company team they work for. Because that's where work actually happens. 2. The best plan intelligence wins. Because the world moves too fast for plans. 3. The best companies cascade goals meaning. Because that's what they all share. 4. The best people are well-rounded spiky. Because uniqueness is a feature not a bug. 5. People need feedback attention. Because we all want to be seen for who we are at our best. 6. People can reliably rate other people their own experience. Because that's all we have. 7. People have potential momentum. Because we all move through the world differently. 8. Work-life balance Love in work matters most. Because that's what work is really for. 9. Leadership is a thing We follow spikes. Because spikes bring us certainty. Decisions Information used to be shared by individuals and decisions made by leaders. Now it’s the opposite. Information needs to be shared by leaders with decisions being made by individuals. Leadership It’s more important to get team members the information they need then it is to craft a perfect leadership message. You can’t manufacture or fake leadership, then you fail at authenticity. Best companies don’t cascade goals they cascade meaning. Not all leaders create leadership in exactly the same way, which makes it very hard to be measured. He says that the best definition of a leader is someone who people are following. It’s easier to measure followers than leaders. Management Everyone should have a one on one every week with their manager as a check in with two questions asked. 1. What are your priorities for this week? 2. How can I help? The check in can be as short as 10 to 15 minutes. Every week is important so that you can get into the nitty-gritty details. Turn peoples uniqueness into a feature. Identify times when people are demonstrating strengths and ask them about it. You cannot create excellence by fixing the current problem. Find a way to weave what you love into your work. People in the same role love different aspects. Evaluations Don’t judge people on their potential, but you can evaluate their current momentum. Flip evaluations around. Instead of trying to grade people on certain attributes of their character and abilities and asking them on a scale of 1 to 5 does this person show excellence. You should figure out how to ask about information you understand such as do you regularly go to this person when you need someone to architect a solution. Then people aren't guessing on a made-up metric but they are accurately informing based on their past decisions.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anu

    I am a fan of Marcus Buckingham's work. I always have my teams do the strengthsfinder exercise so they are aware of what they love and can use those to go from good to great. The book has 9 parts: 1. People join companies, but leave teams. The theory is that while people care for the company they join, what it stands for, culture, values etc. the biggest part of their experience is their team. Yeah, kinda true, but also true of managers. And depending on the role, multiple teams really. 2. Focus o I am a fan of Marcus Buckingham's work. I always have my teams do the strengthsfinder exercise so they are aware of what they love and can use those to go from good to great. The book has 9 parts: 1. People join companies, but leave teams. The theory is that while people care for the company they join, what it stands for, culture, values etc. the biggest part of their experience is their team. Yeah, kinda true, but also true of managers. And depending on the role, multiple teams really. 2. Focus on sharing intelligence rather than plans - Planning doesn't tell you where to go, it more helps you understand where you are. Goals have to be directionally correct, not set in excruciating detail. As a leader, share as much data as you can, let the team build intelligence around it and use it as they see fit. Watch and optimize. I liked this - makes a good case for openness 3. Best companies cascade meaning, not just goals - explaining why is always better than giving people goals to cascade to. True story. From MBOs to SMART goals to KPIs to BHAGs to the now trendy OKRs, they never tell the story of why, just the what. We obsess over "what" instead of explain why. Cascading meaning can be through culture(what we stand for), rituals or stories 4. Good leaders are spiky, not fully well rounded - this is a corollary to the strengths theory. Strengths are what give you joy, make you feel strong, rather than just what you are good at. Good leaders are really great at a few things and not bad at most others. It is the sum of these that matter rather than being good at everything. Each of us are unique, hone and cultivate this uniqueness, partner up with a team that can balance you out rather than trying to do that within an individual 5. People need attention, not feedback - this one was meh. While I buy the fact that positive attention is often the best catalyst to good performance, writing off negative feedback entirely renders a disservice to people. Radical candor did a better job of capturing this, in my mind 6. Managers can rate people reliably - again, this felt like overgeneralization killed the point. While the specific leading qs (would you go to this person for any difficult job? would you promote them now if you can?) were concrete tips, it didn’t generate any great insight 7. People have momentum - I liked the articulation of this. Momentum, a product of mass (strengths/traits that individuals have) and velocity (outcomes delivered thus far) as a way to describe performance trajectory rather than potential 8. Love of work matters more than work-life balance. “You’ll never feel proud of your work if you find no joy in it, your best work is always joyful work” Find ways to do more of what you love and you’ll get better at your job. Sounds like new age advice but I quite liked the practical advice around self-awareness on the job, tracking “red threads”, weaving strengths into your daily routine etc. 9. Leadership is what your followers experience, not what you do - The currency of leadership is human relationships - emotional bonds, trust, love. If you understand who you are, at your core and hone that understanding into a few special abilities, each of which magnifies your intent, your essence, your humanity, then people are inspired to follow. Overall, a great read, even if you aren’t familiar with Gallup or Marcus’ earlier work. The stories are engaging and the quotes are fun.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alysson

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ This is a great book and one of the best management books I’ve read in awhile. It definitely makes you think about the ‘lies’ of management versus the ‘truths.’ I won’t share the truths because I don’t want to spoil it BUT the lies we have been told to believe: 1.) People care what company they work for 2.) The best plan wins 3.) The best companies cascade goals 4.) The best people are well rounded 5.) People want feedback 6.) People can reliably rate other people 7.) People have potential 8 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This is a great book and one of the best management books I’ve read in awhile. It definitely makes you think about the ‘lies’ of management versus the ‘truths.’ I won’t share the truths because I don’t want to spoil it BUT the lies we have been told to believe: 1.) People care what company they work for 2.) The best plan wins 3.) The best companies cascade goals 4.) The best people are well rounded 5.) People want feedback 6.) People can reliably rate other people 7.) People have potential 8.) Work life balance matters most 8.) Leadership is a thing #bookstagram #nineliesaboutwork

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    Didn’t agree with all the ideas. They definitely cherry picked their examples (like many books in this genre do), and took some of the concepts too far. And yet I liked it-it made me think and discuss with others. Some different viewpoints that are worth considering (and some that are pretty standard just dressed up as contrarian). First half of the book was stronger than second half.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eva

    Very interesting and data-backed takes on established company, leadership and work environment norms, made relatable by good story-telling. May need to read again.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Klien

    Best business book I've read during last couple of years. Makes you question a lot of the "absolute truths" about management.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Fedyunin

    I've called that "a good idea with wrong execution". A few goot thoughts there are hiden in massive fakes, PRs, propaganda examples and unproved arguments.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    This is another provocative and fascinating book from Marcus Buckingham. As always, he supports his findings with research, as well as interesting examples.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lisa K

    I love this book! I read a lot of business books, usually about one per month. I really enjoyed the fresh look at leading/following this book offered. I am grateful to have won it in a Goodreads giveaway and will be recommending it to my business book club.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Soundview Executive Book Summaries

    You are a leader in your organization and the sum of the functions you perform is called leadership. The declarative nature of such a statement can often prompt heated debates between multiple constituents. Critics may dismiss leadership theory as dogma; humanists may advocate for the value of employee engagement over top-down control; and academics may deliver a lengthy treatise on whether leaders are born or made. In their new book Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Rea You are a leader in your organization and the sum of the functions you perform is called leadership. The declarative nature of such a statement can often prompt heated debates between multiple constituents. Critics may dismiss leadership theory as dogma; humanists may advocate for the value of employee engagement over top-down control; and academics may deliver a lengthy treatise on whether leaders are born or made. In their new book Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World, Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall take a far more pragmatic position. For them, the statement that: ‘Leadership is a Thing’ is a lie – one of nine lies, in fact, that cause distortion, frustration, and fundamentally wrong assumptions about running a business. Control and Uniformity For the authors, much of this distortion and frustration arises from a benign intent to “exert control and impose uniformity.” By prioritizing process over people, the system ensures a perceived commitment to equality and the naïve belief that any data collected from the operation of that system is representative of each participant in that system. Unfortunately, that systemic approach also undermines the growth potential of most organizations. Yes, you need systems to manage hundreds of thousands of employees, but that doesn’t mean that each of those employees should be managed the same. Six of the nine “lies” challenge the emphasis on control and uniformity directly by focusing on the needs of people. For example: Lie #1: People Care Which Company They Work For is presented as a lie because the statement assumes a broad commitment to a brand. There are some organizations where the commitment to a culture is very strong––Patagonia, Apple, Chick-fil-A, for example––but the deeper emotional connection resides with the team that you work with on a daily basis. Lie #4 The Best People Are Well-Rounded falls back on the persistence of uniformity as measured in competency models that drive generic job descriptions. Those competency models, the authors argue, are inherently flawed because they confuse states (as in state of mind) with traits that are inherent predispositions that drive “recurring patterns of thought, feeling, and behavior.” In more blunt terms, “well-rounded people” are an excuse for not recognizing the individuality and potential of your people. In this context, ‘freethinking’ becomes less about thinking outside the box, and more about being brave enough to challenge the status quo and put your people above the process. Focus on the cohesion of your team over some vague concept of culture for the organization as a whole. Nine Lies About Work identifies nine ‘lies’ that deliberately undermine the growth potential of organizations. If you’re willing to become a freethinking leader, challenge accepted dogma, and disrupt the status quo by seeing these “lies” for what they are, your organization may be one of the very few to realize their full potential. Soundview subscribers get in-depth summaries of the key concepts in best-selling business books (like this one) delivered to them every month! Take your career to new heights by staying up-to-date with the trends and ideas affecting business leaders around the globe.

  13. 4 out of 5

    George Slade

    A Well Needed and Refreshing Paradigm Shift In Management Theory I really needed to read this book and absorb its message. It's very relatable, as a manager/leader who has had issues buying into a lot of concepts and approaches that are shoved down our throats at every seminar and in every book written about the subject. I think the main idea of the book, if you had to summarize, would be that we need to stop treating our teammates as mini projects inherently flawed and in desperate need of our co A Well Needed and Refreshing Paradigm Shift In Management Theory I really needed to read this book and absorb its message. It's very relatable, as a manager/leader who has had issues buying into a lot of concepts and approaches that are shoved down our throats at every seminar and in every book written about the subject. I think the main idea of the book, if you had to summarize, would be that we need to stop treating our teammates as mini projects inherently flawed and in desperate need of our corrective action, but rather that we should see where each team member can really lean in and contribute the most high level output to the team and thus the company. I don't expect to be able to immediately implement follow up ideas and steps to align my real work and surrounding teams with the ideas put forth in the book; however, I do plan to work on incremental steps towards doing things outlined in the book as better approaches. Change is often resisted, especially too much in too short of a time. Here's a summary of each lie: 1. People Care What Company They Work For (Truth - People care what teams they work for.) 2. The Best Plan Wins (Truth - The Best Intelligence Wins) 3. The Best Companies Cascade Goals (Truth - People will not be encouraged to attain goals set forth by others. Measuring goal attainment throughout the year isn't a valid approach, as goal attainment is binary, either goals or met or they are not.) 4. The Best People Are Well Rounded (Truth - High performers are typically really good at a particular thing and should not strive for high performance in all areas.) 5. People Want Feedback (Truth - We learn most in our comfort zones. It's where we are most creative and insightful.) - I found this one to be the most substantial lie outlined the book, just slightly more crucial than #4. 6. People Can Reliably Rate Other People 7. People Have Potential (Truth - People can have momentum, which can vary over time, but the concept of potential, a binary statement, is harmful and misleading.) 8. Work Life Balance Matters Most (Truth - Loving at least part of your work matters most.) 9. Leadership is a Thing (GASP!) - (Truth - Followership is a thing, and no two leaders create it the same way.) What am I going to do differently because of this book? I will attempt to focus more on building on my team's momentum and celebrating areas of strength and success, instead of looking for opportune moments for coaching and only giving feedback on shortcomings. Even though one could derive many changes to implement, I think in the spirit of not going with too many too quickly, this one is the biggest one that will make the most impact. Pareto would be proud. It's a well paced book, and since it's divided into chapters for each lie, then if you just can't buy into what you're reading, skip ahead to the next lie. For me, I saw validity in all of the theories, even some of the example companies, Chic Fil A / Facebook, may not be the best examples people will get behind. If you want the ideas of the book, but just can't sit down and read through it, checkout the HBR Idea Casts episodes from the past few months. Several of them are offshoots of the principles in the book. I guess that's good marketing!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marquise Kamanke

    A few gems. The storytelling wasn't compelling enough to keep me going but the truths are valuable. Here's a copy of @Brian Kramps's review which summarises the book pretty spot-on. -- This is a well-written book by an author whose work I've read before. First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently is on my favorites list. The following are my notes: 1. People care which company team they work for. Because that's where work actually happens. 2. The best plan intellige A few gems. The storytelling wasn't compelling enough to keep me going but the truths are valuable. Here's a copy of @Brian Kramps's review which summarises the book pretty spot-on. -- This is a well-written book by an author whose work I've read before. First, Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently is on my favorites list. The following are my notes: 1. People care which company team they work for. Because that's where work actually happens. 2. The best plan intelligence wins. Because the world moves too fast for plans. 3. The best companies cascade goals meaning. Because that's what they all share. 4. The best people are well-rounded spiky. Because uniqueness is a feature not a bug. 5. People need feedback attention. Because we all want to be seen for who we are at our best. 6. People can reliably rate other people their own experience. Because that's all we have. 7. People have potential momentum. Because we all move through the world differently. 8. Work-life balance Love in work matters most. Because that's what work is really for. 9. Leadership is a thing We follow spikes. Because spikes bring us certainty. Decisions Information used to be shared by individuals and decisions made by leaders. Now it’s the opposite. Information needs to be shared by leaders with decisions being made by individuals. Leadership It’s more important to get team members the information they need then it is to craft a perfect leadership message. You can’t manufacture or fake leadership, then you fail at authenticity. Best companies don’t cascade goals they cascade meaning. Not all leaders create leadership in exactly the same way, which makes it very hard to be measured. He says that the best definition of a leader is someone who people are following. It’s easier to measure followers than leaders. Management Everyone should have a one on one every week with their manager as a check in with two questions asked. 1. What are your priorities for this week? 2. How can I help? The check in can be as short as 10 to 15 minutes. Every week is important so that you can get into the nitty-gritty details. Turn peoples uniqueness into a feature. Identify times when people are demonstrating strengths and ask them about it. You cannot create excellence by fixing the current problem. Find a way to weave what you love into your work. People in the same role love different aspects. Evaluations Don’t judge people on their potential, but you can evaluate their current momentum. Flip evaluations around. Instead of trying to grade people on certain attributes of their character and abilities and asking them on a scale of 1 to 5 does this person show excellence. You should figure out how to ask about information you understand such as do you regularly go to this person when you need someone to architect a solution. Then people aren't guessing on a made-up metric but they are accurately informing based on their past decisions.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alison Jones

    Reading this book you start to feel as I imagine those standing in the crowd next to the child who pointed out that the Emperor was in fact starkers might have felt; a mix of realization, relief, and embarrassment at having gone along with the charade for so long. Most of us buy into the competencies frameworks, the 360-degree feedback, the importance of company culture and the 90-day plan These are the eponymous ‘lies’: 1. People care which company they work for (they don’t: they care which team Reading this book you start to feel as I imagine those standing in the crowd next to the child who pointed out that the Emperor was in fact starkers might have felt; a mix of realization, relief, and embarrassment at having gone along with the charade for so long. Most of us buy into the competencies frameworks, the 360-degree feedback, the importance of company culture and the 90-day plan These are the eponymous ‘lies’: 1. People care which company they work for (they don’t: they care which team they’re in) 2. The best plan wins (plans get in the way – give your people goals and real-time information and let them get on with it) 3. The best companies cascade goals (focus on cascading meaning, and let your people create their own goals around that) 4. The best people are well-rounded (No, the best people are spiky, playing to their unique strengths) 5. People need feedback (No, they need attention, and positive attention gets massively better results than negative – notice what’s working) 6. People can reliably rate other people (People suck at rating other people – all we can reliably rate is our own experience of people 7. People have potential (Not a lie, technically, just useless: EVERYONE has potential; they prefer the concept of momentum – direction plus velocity) 8. Work-life balance matters most (When people find love in work, the work = bad, life = good assumption simply evaporates) 9. Leadership is a thing (There’s no single ‘leadership’ quality – only being able to attract followers, and that comes down to being able to make people feel better about the future with you) Some of these lies carry more ‘aha!’ in their exposing than others. For me, the most revelatory were 5 and 6: it was frankly astonishing to discover that positive feedback is 30 x more effective at improving performance than negative feedback (though even negative feedback is more effective than no attention at all). And it makes complete sense: when we give negative feedback, we’re effectively saying: ‘Not like that, like this.’ We’re telling them to do what works for us; but we’re not them. When we notice what’s working and show it to them, we’re helping them identify what works for them. The same logic lies behind our utter inability to reliably rate someone on their ‘leadership potential’, ‘strategic thinking’ or any other attribute we’re expected to be able to quantify. Not only do we all have very different ideas of what those attributes are supposed to look like, how on earth do we translate these vague impressions into meaningful numbers? The solution, Buckingham and Goodall suggest, is to ask people to rate their own experience of working with someone. It’s a more complex metric, but much more reliable. Performance measurement and management is a mutli-billion-dollar industry and the preoccupation of most managers. This book brings a bracing blast of common sense that should make every leader at every level reassess how they’re doing it and, just maybe, acknowledge that their tidy charts might actually be the Emperor’s new metrics.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sonee

    Where to start. Reasons to avoid reading the book 1. Can be summarised in a page - serious readers wishing some take away please wait for book summaries to spout up in the net, read from there 2. Provides no new insight - its a mish mash of few professionals deciding on topics of interest and writing essays with sprinklers of weird real life analogies and examples 3. The book has a lot of built-in-distractions that deviate you from the flow. Sudden jargons will sprout to simply validate the origin o Where to start. Reasons to avoid reading the book 1. Can be summarised in a page - serious readers wishing some take away please wait for book summaries to spout up in the net, read from there 2. Provides no new insight - its a mish mash of few professionals deciding on topics of interest and writing essays with sprinklers of weird real life analogies and examples 3. The book has a lot of built-in-distractions that deviate you from the flow. Sudden jargons will sprout to simply validate the origin or the thought, and will take up space, by the time the jargonized phrase is over you’ve sort of forgotten where you started. 4. whatever few interesting original points were made, they were over diluted with paras going nowhere 5. Silly examples, with an attempt to over-generalise the functioning of an organisation 6. Theories are benchmarked with some one-size-fit-all model organization and the authors go on to refute what's wrong with the theory 7. The topics are not cogently delivered

  17. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    There are several things I can use to describe my experience with this book. One of which is thought-provoking. This book as the name implies, is fearless in exposing the so-called lies that perpetuate amongst most organizations these days. This book is also a paradigm-shifting. It changes the way you see the most basic management practices we have today. One of my favorites is the view that the best companies don’t cascade goals; they cascade meaning. The best part here is that in every lies th There are several things I can use to describe my experience with this book. One of which is thought-provoking. This book as the name implies, is fearless in exposing the so-called lies that perpetuate amongst most organizations these days. This book is also a paradigm-shifting. It changes the way you see the most basic management practices we have today. One of my favorites is the view that the best companies don’t cascade goals; they cascade meaning. The best part here is that in every lies the authors exposed, they back up their claim with data and solid arguments. Off course, not every one will be convinced as I have some reservations as well. What is commendable is that they were able to weave the right strings of reasoning to make a good case for their views. I encourage every one to read this book. I strongly inclined to recommend these ideas to followers of today; some of whom will be leaders in the future.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    This is a much talked about book that is being released on April 2. It is well written, especially for a business book and does a nice job of interspersing tidbits of history, literature and sports to reinforce a concept or provide context and even offers some humor along the way. It is definitely a worthwhile read. Beware the authors are definitely cynical of many common processes. I don’t agree with all of their assumptions or conclusions but I came away with plenty to digest and explore. I st This is a much talked about book that is being released on April 2. It is well written, especially for a business book and does a nice job of interspersing tidbits of history, literature and sports to reinforce a concept or provide context and even offers some humor along the way. It is definitely a worthwhile read. Beware the authors are definitely cynical of many common processes. I don’t agree with all of their assumptions or conclusions but I came away with plenty to digest and explore. I struggled with my rating because at times I thought the authors went on way too long; I understood the point 40% of the way into their explanation and illuminating stories. However, the key points are definitely ones that all leadership teams and HR orgs should explore. Thank you to #NetGalley and #HBRPress for providing me with an early release of this book in exchange for an honest and fair review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    Unlike many business books, Nine Lies is not mostly fluff, vague, and is counter-intuitive for many. It is well written, not repetitive, but still a little longer than it needs to be. This book goes over 9 myths that many managers believe and deconstructs them in the hope that those who have not critically thought about said topics will do so and hopefully end such negative management practices. If you have ever worked under these practices then you might know the flaws but many do not. The best Unlike many business books, Nine Lies is not mostly fluff, vague, and is counter-intuitive for many. It is well written, not repetitive, but still a little longer than it needs to be. This book goes over 9 myths that many managers believe and deconstructs them in the hope that those who have not critically thought about said topics will do so and hopefully end such negative management practices. If you have ever worked under these practices then you might know the flaws but many do not. The best takeaway of this book is to always question/be skeptical of every management practice you hear about/learn. This book would best suit those who are learning management styles, or know about these styles but think they are unequivocally true and have positive effects. [I got an ARC via NetGalley.com]

  20. 5 out of 5

    Don Heiman

    The 2019 book “Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World” is joint authored by global researcher Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall, a Senior Vice President of Leadership and Team Intelligence at Cisco. These authors write a compelling case for rethinking the standard bromides about how people succeed at work and in their professional engagements. I found the authors’ observations thought provoking, easy to follow, and well considered. Their chapter on “work-life ba The 2019 book “Nine Lies About Work: A Freethinking Leader’s Guide to the Real World” is joint authored by global researcher Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall, a Senior Vice President of Leadership and Team Intelligence at Cisco. These authors write a compelling case for rethinking the standard bromides about how people succeed at work and in their professional engagements. I found the authors’ observations thought provoking, easy to follow, and well considered. Their chapter on “work-life balance matters most” I especially liked. Marcus and Ashley question in detail why popular dictates about best plans, cascading goals, feedback, people potential, and performance ratings have many flawed notions about what constitutes work happiness and success. This will be a fun book to discuss with my friends and colleagues over beer and coffee. I am making arrangements today! (L)

  21. 5 out of 5

    William Anderson

    The top 9 things you have known but can't admit about your day to day life at work dissected, explained and strategized on. Nine Lies about work is in fact a book about explaining misconceptions and while after reading it you may in fact have a better sense of how to lead, what values to instill and what change your organization needs, what you will definitely have is a better sense of how you navigate yourself at work and why what frustrates you frustrates you. A primary thesis is that humans a The top 9 things you have known but can't admit about your day to day life at work dissected, explained and strategized on. Nine Lies about work is in fact a book about explaining misconceptions and while after reading it you may in fact have a better sense of how to lead, what values to instill and what change your organization needs, what you will definitely have is a better sense of how you navigate yourself at work and why what frustrates you frustrates you. A primary thesis is that humans are complex and a majority of contemporary practices especially in regards to our judgement or evaluation of others are reductionary and never stood a chance of being accurate to begin with.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I was curious about this book and expected to like it because I am a Strengths fan. The authors give solid advice for front-line leaders - more transparency, weekly 1:1s, positive feedback, etc. (None of these ideas are necessarily new.) I do think they throw the baby out with the bath water when in reality their solutions could work alongside talent programs. Many of their examples sound like leaders are not using talent programs the way they are intended. I also think some advice is overly optim I was curious about this book and expected to like it because I am a Strengths fan. The authors give solid advice for front-line leaders - more transparency, weekly 1:1s, positive feedback, etc. (None of these ideas are necessarily new.) I do think they throw the baby out with the bath water when in reality their solutions could work alongside talent programs. Many of their examples sound like leaders are not using talent programs the way they are intended. I also think some advice is overly optimistic. I’ll be interested to hear how organizations perform as they implement the ideas in this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Positive attention is better than negative attention and better than no attention. Catching what people excel and interrupt them and ask them to reflect on what they did great. if someone fails, ask what he/she can do to mend for it, ask to reflect what did he/she do last time in a similar situation that solves the problem. Don't give negative feedback... in a team, when asking people to rate each other, ask them to reflect on some specific question that directs them to reflect how they respond Positive attention is better than negative attention and better than no attention. Catching what people excel and interrupt them and ask them to reflect on what they did great. if someone fails, ask what he/she can do to mend for it, ask to reflect what did he/she do last time in a similar situation that solves the problem. Don't give negative feedback... in a team, when asking people to rate each other, ask them to reflect on some specific question that directs them to reflect how they respond to this person rather than to give the person a score. In this way, we can better ensure the validity of our data.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Absolutely fantastic This book his so close to home the entire way through. It's one of the few books I am tempted to buy a ton of copies of and just have them to my senior management to read. While it's good the entire way through, the final lie if the book -- regarding leadership -- was worth buying this book for in itself. The ONLY reason I'm giving it 4 and not 5 stars is the writing style... which unfortunately reminded me of my own style. I found it a little too casual with a lot of interven Absolutely fantastic This book his so close to home the entire way through. It's one of the few books I am tempted to buy a ton of copies of and just have them to my senior management to read. While it's good the entire way through, the final lie if the book -- regarding leadership -- was worth buying this book for in itself. The ONLY reason I'm giving it 4 and not 5 stars is the writing style... which unfortunately reminded me of my own style. I found it a little too casual with a lot of interventions mid-sentence, a lot of run on sentences, and just odd sentence structures throughout. Highly recommend this book for anyone in the corporate world... At all levels.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Chances are good that if you've read any of Buckingham's other books, you've basically read this one too. What I liked about it so much though what the neat layout and persuasive dialogue coupled with data pointing to the reasons for the conclusions. I didn't think it was earth shaking though some of their included information did turn me on my head a little. What? Why isn't 360 feedback good? Why CAN'T I just study leadership qualities and be a leader. Good, practical, down-to-earth advice whic Chances are good that if you've read any of Buckingham's other books, you've basically read this one too. What I liked about it so much though what the neat layout and persuasive dialogue coupled with data pointing to the reasons for the conclusions. I didn't think it was earth shaking though some of their included information did turn me on my head a little. What? Why isn't 360 feedback good? Why CAN'T I just study leadership qualities and be a leader. Good, practical, down-to-earth advice which has given me plenty to think about in my journey, not only to be a leader, but to be a better version of me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    For someone with a few decades in corporate America, this book certainly challenges many of my widely held beliefs and practices. I enjoyed the provocation and the author's suggestions for looking at things differently. While I don't I agreed with all of their conclusions, perhaps I could be convinced if they cited more data, studies, etc. rather than just asserted these "lies." (I didn't read the footnotes, so many they hid the information in there). Best of all, they end the book with the 9 Tr For someone with a few decades in corporate America, this book certainly challenges many of my widely held beliefs and practices. I enjoyed the provocation and the author's suggestions for looking at things differently. While I don't I agreed with all of their conclusions, perhaps I could be convinced if they cited more data, studies, etc. rather than just asserted these "lies." (I didn't read the footnotes, so many they hid the information in there). Best of all, they end the book with the 9 Truths. That's one page I'll go back to over time.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Love

    The book gives a fresh and well researched view on what is going on in organizations today and debunks a lot of old and persistent myths about work. I really liked it and it is well written and easy to read. The only flaw I found was the comments on the work of Professor Robert Kegan and others on adult development, which I think the author has misinterpreted, but it is a minor flaw considering that the book covers a broad area of subjects related to organizational development.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Renato Willi

    Thaís os a great book for all those interested in "people Management" or talent, or leadership (I don’t know how to call it anymore... Many things we thought we knew are lies, as the authors show through data - including that leadership is a thing. I absolutely recomend it, and I think (and hope) this book leads to new better practices to provide a better experience for people in their companies and their careers.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Magda Krakowiak

    Well written and though provoking book which I would recommend not only to people interested in management per se, but also those struggling with finding meaning in work and aching for fulfillment. The writing style is really entertaining. Authors use clever analogies and let ideas flow throughout the book. Many lessons can be drawn from it for teammates, people involved in talent development, team building and team management. I highly enjoyed it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Read this in relation to work (our company adopted Marcus Buckingham). It's an interesting look at the concepts behind some of the changes happening with performance appraisals and employee engagement at my company. It's geared towards managers who manage people (vs. manage projects). I'd rate it higher, but goodreads isn't my work place (LOL) and it's not something I'd recommend to a casual sort of reader.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.