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The Language of Fire: Joan of Arc Reimagined

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The Language of Fire is a lyrical, dark, and moving look at the life of Joan of Arc, who as a teen girl in the fifteenth century commanded an army and helped crown a king of France. This extraordinary verse novel from award-winning author Stephanie Hemphill dares to imagine how an ordinary girl became a great leader, and ultimately saved a nation. Jehanne was an illiterate The Language of Fire is a lyrical, dark, and moving look at the life of Joan of Arc, who as a teen girl in the fifteenth century commanded an army and helped crown a king of France. This extraordinary verse novel from award-winning author Stephanie Hemphill dares to imagine how an ordinary girl became a great leader, and ultimately saved a nation. Jehanne was an illiterate peasant, never quite at home among her siblings and peers. Until one day, she hears a voice call to her, telling her she is destined for important things. She begins to understand that she has been called by God, chosen for a higher purpose—to save France. Through sheer determination and incredible courage, Jehanne becomes the unlikeliest of heroes. She runs away from home, dresses in men’s clothes, and convinces an army that she will lead France to victory. As a girl in a man’s world, at a time when women truly had no power, Jehanne faced constant threats and violence from the men around her. Despite the impossible odds, Jehanne became a fearless warrior who has inspired generations.


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The Language of Fire is a lyrical, dark, and moving look at the life of Joan of Arc, who as a teen girl in the fifteenth century commanded an army and helped crown a king of France. This extraordinary verse novel from award-winning author Stephanie Hemphill dares to imagine how an ordinary girl became a great leader, and ultimately saved a nation. Jehanne was an illiterate The Language of Fire is a lyrical, dark, and moving look at the life of Joan of Arc, who as a teen girl in the fifteenth century commanded an army and helped crown a king of France. This extraordinary verse novel from award-winning author Stephanie Hemphill dares to imagine how an ordinary girl became a great leader, and ultimately saved a nation. Jehanne was an illiterate peasant, never quite at home among her siblings and peers. Until one day, she hears a voice call to her, telling her she is destined for important things. She begins to understand that she has been called by God, chosen for a higher purpose—to save France. Through sheer determination and incredible courage, Jehanne becomes the unlikeliest of heroes. She runs away from home, dresses in men’s clothes, and convinces an army that she will lead France to victory. As a girl in a man’s world, at a time when women truly had no power, Jehanne faced constant threats and violence from the men around her. Despite the impossible odds, Jehanne became a fearless warrior who has inspired generations.

30 review for The Language of Fire: Joan of Arc Reimagined

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Antill

    I have always loved reading about Joan of Arc. A teenage girl in the 1400s is raised above her station and called by God to fight among men and unite France. It's amazing for it's time. It's amazing for any time. And Stephanie Hemphill does a wonderful job capturing the life and the legend of the Maid of Lorraine. In the Language of Fire, Joan is everything I thought her to be. She is courageous and strong but also humble and pious. Her character is complex and human. And while her life was I have always loved reading about Joan of Arc. A teenage girl in the 1400s is raised above her station and called by God to fight among men and unite France. It's amazing for it's time. It's amazing for any time. And Stephanie Hemphill does a wonderful job capturing the life and the legend of the Maid of Lorraine. In the Language of Fire, Joan is everything I thought her to be. She is courageous and strong but also humble and pious. Her character is complex and human. And while her life was filled with miracles she was very relatable. Some creative liberties were taken and most of which I had no problem with. However, I found one place in the book that made me pause. The very last line reads: "The girls who fear the fire inside themselves, I burned for them ". I get what the author is trying to do here but...UMM... No she didn't. While Joan's bravery is a great example for girls or anyone really, Joan is not some social justice warrior. While her story is empowering, she did not die to empower females. She died for her beliefs, that God called her to unite France and the English couldn't have her around to rally the troops against them. I have no problem with stories about female empowerment but Joan's life should speak for itself instead of having today's social/political issues woven into her narrative. With that said, I still recommend this book 100%! The last line gets a bit of an eye roll. The rest of the book get five fantastic stars and I would give it more if I could.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    This book begins when Joan of Arc, in her early adolescence, first hears the voice of God assigning her the task of helping to end the Hundred Years' War, and continues up to and beyond her death. Told in the format of a verse novel, the book reimagines the rise of a well-known historical figure in a way that feels completely fresh and full of the kind of details that are often discarded when discussing the almost mythical leader. An excellent retelling.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Saruuh Kelsey

    I'm always on the look out for new novels in verse, so when I saw a poetry book about Joan of Arc? No brainer, got it instantly. This book is, as you would expect, difficult to read at times. It shows the best and worst parts of religion, humanity, and the treatment of women at the time (and does a not terrible job of reflecting the current state of things, either.) I didn't enjoy the book per se, I don't think you CAN enjoy something this rough and difficult to read, but I am glad I read it. I I'm always on the look out for new novels in verse, so when I saw a poetry book about Joan of Arc? No brainer, got it instantly. This book is, as you would expect, difficult to read at times. It shows the best and worst parts of religion, humanity, and the treatment of women at the time (and does a not terrible job of reflecting the current state of things, either.) I didn't enjoy the book per se, I don't think you CAN enjoy something this rough and difficult to read, but I am glad I read it. I feel like I know more about Joan of Arc now, and I appreciate the further reading bit in the back. This book is so well written, and Joan's faith and belief in God shines through on every page. It's not a book I'll forget, and it's one I'll recommend every time Joan's (or Jehanne's) name crops up.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard

    Plot twist: she dies Why have I never read verse before this year?! It lends itself SO WELL to historical fiction! I really liked the start of this book especially since her family life is not something I've really ever heard of. I also loved how this showed how heavily manipulated faith was in order to suppress women. Also, big shout out to the author for simplify the Hundred Years War and complex political conflicts into like 3 digestible pages at the beginning.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caylynn Bleess

    Even if I can't change the direction of the wind, why must I agree that foul air smells sweet? Meh. I can't say that I really enjoyed this one as much as I hoped I was going to. Admittedly, I found myself continuously comparing this novel to David Elliott's Voices that was published back in March of this year. I was absolutely blown away by that novel, since it was my first introduction to fiction told through verse. However, The Language of Fire just fell a little too short for me. Where Even if I can't change the direction of the wind, why must I agree that foul air smells sweet? Meh. I can't say that I really enjoyed this one as much as I hoped I was going to. Admittedly, I found myself continuously comparing this novel to David Elliott's Voices that was published back in March of this year. I was absolutely blown away by that novel, since it was my first introduction to fiction told through verse. However, The Language of Fire just fell a little too short for me. Where Elliott's novel told Joan of Arc's tale through visually stunning works of written art, Hemphill's book is made up of simple freeform poetry. Relatively short stanzas that don't even rhyme (which isn't usually a problem for me) fill up an unnecessary amount of pages. While I enjoyed the story itself for the most part, I don't think the author's style of writing fits with verse in general. I probably would've liked this book a lot more if it was told in a typical BOOK layout. Also, I hate to admit it... but I was a tad bit annoyed by how monotonous Joan was. There wasn't any change in regards to her POV and voice throughout the entirety of the novel. And since the whole story was told through her perspective, it really dragged the book to the point where I just wanted to skim some of the stanzas. The inclusion of multiple side characters is what really brought my love of Voices up a few notches, since Elliott used numerous forms of poetry to differentiate between each character's POV. If Hemphill had done this, I'm sure it would've broken up the repetitive flow of the story. I would definitely give this book a read if you love reading about Joan of Arc like I do. It wasn't a terrible novel, by any means, but I think that Voices dominates the JoA verse stories to the point where it has ruined every other one for me lol. I'll never say no to getting my hands on more tales about my favorite heroine, which is why I gave The Language of Fire 3/5 instead of 2/5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    I don't know much about the story of Joan of Arc other than the simple details of her hearing angels, helping to crown the Dauphin, and subsequently being burnt at the stake by the English. That being said, I really enjoyed this book! The point of view of Jehanne (as she called herself) was so vivid. I felt as if I was with her throughout her journey. However, I would have enjoyed knowing what was happening in a broader sense, like what other people were thinking or doing. I might end up looking I don't know much about the story of Joan of Arc other than the simple details of her hearing angels, helping to crown the Dauphin, and subsequently being burnt at the stake by the English. That being said, I really enjoyed this book! The point of view of Jehanne (as she called herself) was so vivid. I felt as if I was with her throughout her journey. However, I would have enjoyed knowing what was happening in a broader sense, like what other people were thinking or doing. I might end up looking for more novels and nonfiction to help expand my knowledge of this time period. It was also very interesting to read this after watching Netflix's "The King", starring Timothee Chalamet. The movie shows the events that led to the Hundred Years War. I'm not sure of its accuracy, since I haven't read much about the war. But the idea that the war wasn't intentionally started by the English is interesting to compare to Jehanne's view of the English as a horrible enemy. Overall, I enjoyed this book much more than Hemphill's other work, "Wicked Girls". The verse writing style merged well with this story and the plot was much less juvenile. If you're interested in Joan of Arc, the Hundred Years War, or French history, I highly recommend "The Language of Fire".

  7. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    UM YES PLEASE Joan of Arc is the best

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Hager

    Stephanie Hemphill explains in a note before the book begins that she chose to call Joan of Arc Jehanne because that was how she referred to herself. Also, like her other books, this is a novel in verse. I didn't know very much about Joan of Arc before reading this book. (Young girl hears voices from God, leads an army, burned at the stake, eventually canonized.) I'm over twice her age now; she was martyred at 19. Another thing I didn't know is that she started hearing voices (technically, she Stephanie Hemphill explains in a note before the book begins that she chose to call Joan of Arc Jehanne because that was how she referred to herself. Also, like her other books, this is a novel in verse. I didn't know very much about Joan of Arc before reading this book. (Young girl hears voices from God, leads an army, burned at the stake, eventually canonized.) I'm over twice her age now; she was martyred at 19. Another thing I didn't know is that she started hearing voices (technically, she heard from three saints) at 13. I can't even imagine how terrifying that must have been or how hard it would be to find the courage to believe that you're really supposed to lead the French army and get the correct person on the throne. It'd be hard enough to believe it today, but back in the 1400s when women didn't do anything but get married and have kids? Hard pass. While I learned a great deal about Jehanne while reading this, it didn't feel at all like homework. She was a trailblazer although I don't think she would've agreed with that assessment; she felt she was just doing what God wanted.  As Stephanie Hemphill pointed out, she's the only female warrior most people can name and the only woman who saved a country who wasn't born into a royal family. (She was actually a peasant.) It's an amazing legacy, but it's also more than time for there to be multiple examples of this. At any rate, I loved this book and hope to read more about Joan of Arc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Emilee King

    I should’ve guessed this book would be a little heavy, but I’m shocked at how much it hit me. Such a unique blend of history, fiction, and faith. Honestly makes me wish for more female-led scripture stories. Not only did I learn a lot, but Jehanne’s personal and endearing narrative combined with a unique writing style and hard-hitting tale makes for powerful storytelling 4.6/5

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    3.5/5 stars The Language of Fire is a Young Adult version of Joan of Arc told through verse. This book is divided into eight parts and tells the story of Joan of Arc. The book starts with a very long foreward explaining the actual story. Before reading this I wondered if the verse would be extremely complex. But the book is written quite simply, in very short chapters. And it was easy to understand. The narrator is Jehanne (how the author refers to Joan of Arc). The book comes across almost as 3.5/5 stars The Language of Fire is a Young Adult version of Joan of Arc told through verse. This book is divided into eight parts and tells the story of Joan of Arc. The book starts with a very long foreward explaining the actual story. Before reading this I wondered if the verse would be extremely complex. But the book is written quite simply, in very short chapters. And it was easy to understand. The narrator is Jehanne (how the author refers to Joan of Arc). The book comes across almost as non-fiction. But I guess it is a combination between actual facts and how the author imagined things happening. But truthfully when I saw that the book was called "Joan of Arc Reimagined" I was sort of hoping for a different type of retelling. Maybe a contemporary setting. Or the author completely re-imagining Joan's life. But that is not what this book is at all. Overall, I definitely enjoyed the way this story was told. It was a very interesting way to tell the story. It is basically the retelling of a famous historical figure told through verse. Thanks to edelweiss and Balzer + Bray for allowing me to read this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Ferencz

    This book took me a while to read, but I learned a lot about Joan of Arc and appreciated the way the author helped take us inside the story and situation.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robin Bigda

    I do love a good heroine story that’s historically accurate. And I do so love a novel in verse. This novel has both. I’ve always loved Joan of Arc. This story chronicles Joan’s earlyish life to her martyrdom. Creative liberties were taken. But overall, it’s based in history.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    My first novel in verse! Beautiful and haunting.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shauna Yusko

    Long but good. Pair with Elliott’s Voices

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I've always been fascinated with Joan of Arc and this reimagining of her life was a wonderful exploration into her journey. I am inspired by her. Although I'm not particularly religious, I am her for Joan because she was steadfast in her beliefs and although she may not have intended to be she was quite ahead of her time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    I don't have much taste for verse, but I received an ARC and IT'S JOAN OF ARC. She and I have been tight for a long time. The verse was very accessible and being written for a younger (teen/YA) audience didn't detract from the quality. The style feels simplistic but compliments Joan’s earnestness and devotion. Excuse me while I go rewatch Joan of Arc (1999).

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This book is a stunner, an epic work of poetry retelling the story of Joan of Arc in a very accessible and modern way. It’s meticulously researched and focuses more than anything on her humanity—her fears, her doubts, her devotion, and her bravery. I couldn’t put it down. It’s a story all girls and women need right now. She spoke her truth and never backed down. She was a true warrior.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I love novels in verse and I love historical fiction and I really love strong, warrior women. This version of Joan of Arc's story begins with the horrific knowledge that our protagonist will be burned at the stake. Then reading the story of this unwavering and powerful teenage girl makes us ache.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

    Even if I can't change the direction of the wind, why must I agree that foul air smells sweet The Language of Fire is a fascinating novel. It recounts Joan of Arc's life from her childhood to her early death and fills this myth of a girl with so much life and detail. It does all that in verse form which is a fascinating writing style in itself and which works beautifully in this context. Though the plot sometimes drags and the battles and journeys weren't as interesting to me as I would have liked, Even if I can't change the direction of the wind, why must I agree that foul air smells sweet The Language of Fire is a fascinating novel. It recounts Joan of Arc's life from her childhood to her early death and fills this myth of a girl with so much life and detail. It does all that in verse form which is a fascinating writing style in itself and which works beautifully in this context. Though the plot sometimes drags and the battles and journeys weren't as interesting to me as I would have liked, the story is still incredibly unique and teaches the reader about Joan/Jehanne and her life as well as the situation France was in at the time. Verse form is perfect to visualise her prayers/conversations with God and herself and while I'm not religious myself and never felt any connection to that topic I found Jehanne's thoughts deeply relatable. Her story is moving and many parts of it still resonate today. This novel can be very dark - not surprising when considering the topic - and some poems are viscerally real but it still left me hopeful. I received a copy of this book via Edelweiss/Blazer + Bray

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tasya Dita

    I received an e-ARC through Edelweiss Plus in exchange for an honest review Joan of Arc has been a fascinating figure for many centuries for many people. There's not many known of her as a person, what we know of her is claim to be chosen by God, her subsequent role during the 100 years war and her eventual death. Many fascination rests on the fact she was a simple farmer's daughter, whose role and place were defined strictly at her time, and yet she managed to lead an army towards victory. This I received an e-ARC through Edelweiss Plus in exchange for an honest review Joan of Arc has been a fascinating figure for many centuries for many people. There's not many known of her as a person, what we know of her is claim to be chosen by God, her subsequent role during the 100 years war and her eventual death. Many fascination rests on the fact she was a simple farmer's daughter, whose role and place were defined strictly at her time, and yet she managed to lead an army towards victory. This book offers an insight through Joan's mind from her childhood to her death. Unfortunately, it felt monotonous in many places. It is written in verse, so many aspects are skipped and not explained in details. I love the reflection on the role of women and how she was hated basically because she was a girl and didn't fit the role she was supposed to be- I think verses are a great medium for this. But to tell her story as a whole, of her experiences and battles instead of her thoughts, this writing style just doesn't fit and removes a lot from the reading experience.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne Jones

    If you are interested in knowing about the story of Joan (or Jehanne) or Arc, this book is probably for you. If you already know about the story and are look for a new experience, this might not be for you. I enjoyed this book because I knew little to nothing about Joan of Arc. Somebody who is an expert, may not enjoy it as much. It is told solely through the perspective of Jehanne through proses. I think a problem most people ran into was the fact that the main character is pretty monotonous (I If you are interested in knowing about the story of Joan (or Jehanne) or Arc, this book is probably for you. If you already know about the story and are look for a new experience, this might not be for you. I enjoyed this book because I knew little to nothing about Joan of Arc. Somebody who is an expert, may not enjoy it as much. It is told solely through the perspective of Jehanne through proses. I think a problem most people ran into was the fact that the main character is pretty monotonous (I found this to be so too). It wasn’t enough for me to be completely bored with the book because I was still interested in her story. Those who have read other books about her and are familiar with her story, although, may find themselves to be bored. I think that the last couple of chapters/proses were the best part of the book. It made reading through some of the main character’s monotonous tone worth it. Overall, it was still an enjoyable and easy read for me. I learned a lot about Jehanne D’Arc and could see myself reading this again to get through a reading slump.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    My Review: In high school I was completely fascinated by Joan of Arc, and I am so happy to see a few new books coming out inspired by her. I finally got a chance to pick this book up and it was so worth it. This book was written in verse and tells a story about her life from a young age before she began her journey to liberate France. This book was beautifully written and I found myself unable to put it down. Hemphill did a wonderful job of filling in gaps in the actual history with fiction that My Review: In high school I was completely fascinated by Joan of Arc, and I am so happy to see a few new books coming out inspired by her. I finally got a chance to pick this book up and it was so worth it. This book was written in verse and tells a story about her life from a young age before she began her journey to liberate France. This book was beautifully written and I found myself unable to put it down. Hemphill did a wonderful job of filling in gaps in the actual history with fiction that is believable and weaves nicely with the truth. While it is a book that is over 500 pages, between the verse style and the engrossing story, the pages flow beautifully. If you are looking for something a little different but beautiful, definitely pick this book up!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kiara

    This book occupied the strange middle ground between prose and poetry, and I personally didn't really enjoy it. I felt like the writing wasn't flowery enough to be poetry, but was way too lyrical to be prose. Aside from the language and the formatting, I feel as if this book would have been better served by explaining more of the historical context of the 100 Year's War, framing Joan of Arc's story in the larger events of the time. But damn, what a story it was. Hemphill nails the details about This book occupied the strange middle ground between prose and poetry, and I personally didn't really enjoy it. I felt like the writing wasn't flowery enough to be poetry, but was way too lyrical to be prose. Aside from the language and the formatting, I feel as if this book would have been better served by explaining more of the historical context of the 100 Year's War, framing Joan of Arc's story in the larger events of the time. But damn, what a story it was. Hemphill nails the details about growing up a girl in 1400's France, and she does a great job of making Joan's story accessible and nail-biting, even though everyone knows the ending. The very last couple lines of the book were lyrical and touching- I just wish the rest of the book had been the same.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    The Language of Fire is Joan of Arc's story from her own perspective, told in verse. The poems easily flow from one to the next, making a timeline of Joan's life from her childhood and first encounters with the voice of God, to her finals days and execution. In terms of structure, this was very similar to another book I've read, Blood Water Paint . I love seeing these new ways of telling stories becoming more popular. I think it adds a new element to them, especially stories like Joan's that The Language of Fire is Joan of Arc's story from her own perspective, told in verse. The poems easily flow from one to the next, making a timeline of Joan's life from her childhood and first encounters with the voice of God, to her finals days and execution. In terms of structure, this was very similar to another book I've read, Blood Water Paint . I love seeing these new ways of telling stories becoming more popular. I think it adds a new element to them, especially stories like Joan's that are widely known. Thanks to Edelweiss+ and Balzer + Bray for the eArc.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    Solid 3.5 I kind of felt like the poetry here read like prose. I actually described it to my husband as a novel written vertically. So, that was a bit disappointing throughout. Overall Likes: I did find the poetry/prose really well written & easy to read (despite the book's heft), and I really liked the historical bits. Overall Dislikes: I wasn't so moved by this account/retelling of Joan of Arc, which was a bit disappointing. Joan is such a firey figure (no pun intended! just meaning she Solid 3.5 I kind of felt like the poetry here read like prose. I actually described it to my husband as a novel written vertically. So, that was a bit disappointing throughout. Overall Likes: I did find the poetry/prose really well written & easy to read (despite the book's heft), and I really liked the historical bits. Overall Dislikes: I wasn't so moved by this account/retelling of Joan of Arc, which was a bit disappointing. Joan is such a firey figure (no pun intended! just meaning she friggin leads an army to help crown the King of France!) and this read all very even keel. I.e. A pretty "boring"/even-tempered tone.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I couldn't help but compare this to Voices, another recent novel in verse about Joan of Arc. Elliott's version had better verse, for the most part, though Hemphill's is perfectly fine. Read this if you want a much more historically grounded version of her life, though. I feel like Hemphill had a much better understanding of Joan, and she also didn't throw in any weirdly sexualized metaphors, rarely appropriate in any case but even less so in Joan's.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Despite being written in verse, this was a little long for me. I knew very little about Joan of Arc prior to reading this, but now I feel like I know everything there is to know. Yes she was an incredible person who did incredible things, but it was still a little long winded. I felt more like I was reading her diary rather than someone else's words some 600 years later. The author obviously did a ton on research, and it shows. The ending is of course sad, but I like how the author includes what Despite being written in verse, this was a little long for me. I knew very little about Joan of Arc prior to reading this, but now I feel like I know everything there is to know. Yes she was an incredible person who did incredible things, but it was still a little long winded. I felt more like I was reading her diary rather than someone else's words some 600 years later. The author obviously did a ton on research, and it shows. The ending is of course sad, but I like how the author includes what all happens after her death. In the author's note she included the small changes like her inner turmoil and family interactions.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Beth Huddleston

    With themes of female empowerment, innocence, and faith in spite of fear, this novel in verse makes the story of Joan of Arc accessible. Told in first person, Joan or Jehanne (as she refers to herself in the book) not only battles on horseback, but she also struggles with gaining acceptance from her family and later the church. The author Stephanie Hemphill also does a great job of painting a picture of what it was like to a woman in the fourteenth century with daughterly duties and the threat With themes of female empowerment, innocence, and faith in spite of fear, this novel in verse makes the story of Joan of Arc accessible. Told in first person, Joan or Jehanne (as she refers to herself in the book) not only battles on horseback, but she also struggles with gaining acceptance from her family and later the church. The author Stephanie Hemphill also does a great job of painting a picture of what it was like to a woman in the fourteenth century with daughterly duties and the threat of being violated in the soldier camp and in prison.

  29. 4 out of 5

    sgould8

    This is an intense story- absolutely amazing what thirteen year old Jehanne/Joan of Arc set into motion and accomplished in the 15th century. With everything going against her- her sex, age, and social status- she managed to lead an army and accompany the king of France to his coronation. I hope that's not a spoiler; we probably all know how it ends. The book itself is told in verse, so it flies by. Historical fiction, but very unique, and in the YA section of my public library. Highly recommend This is an intense story- absolutely amazing what thirteen year old Jehanne/Joan of Arc set into motion and accomplished in the 15th century. With everything going against her- her sex, age, and social status- she managed to lead an army and accompany the king of France to his coronation. I hope that's not a spoiler; we probably all know how it ends. The book itself is told in verse, so it flies by. Historical fiction, but very unique, and in the YA section of my public library. Highly recommend if you have any interest in Joan of Arc.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    While it was a little dry for some of the historical parts (the travel and battles, mostly), I thought it was overall interesting and offered insights about society's treatment of women that are still relevant. It was also quick to read and absorb. I'll be sure to check out the author's Wicked Girls someday (about the witch trials in Salem), to see if it's similarly reflective about women and history. (EDIT: I forgot to note that my copy was an ARC, so it did have some typos and I'm assuming While it was a little dry for some of the historical parts (the travel and battles, mostly), I thought it was overall interesting and offered insights about society's treatment of women that are still relevant. It was also quick to read and absorb. I'll be sure to check out the author's Wicked Girls someday (about the witch trials in Salem), to see if it's similarly reflective about women and history. (EDIT: I forgot to note that my copy was an ARC, so it did have some typos and I'm assuming parts of it would have changed between my copy and the final release copy.)

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