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That's What Friends Do

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A heartfelt and powerful debut novel for fans of Erin Entrada Kelly and John David Anderson, Thats What Friends Do is a book for anyone learning how to have the hard conversations about feelings, boundaries, and what it means to be a true friend. Samantha Goldstein and David Fisher have been friends ever since they met on their towns Little League baseball team. But when A heartfelt and powerful debut novel for fans of Erin Entrada Kelly and John David Anderson, That’s What Friends Do is a book for anyone learning how to have the hard conversations about feelings, boundaries, and what it means to be a true friend. Samantha Goldstein and David Fisher have been friends ever since they met on their town’s Little League baseball team. But when a new kid named Luke starts hanging out with them, what was a comfortable pair becomes an awkward trio. Luke’s comments make Sammie feel uncomfortable—but all David sees is how easily Luke flirts with Sammie, and so David decides to finally make a move on the friend he’s always had a crush on. Soon things go all wrong and too far, and Sammie and David are both left feeling hurt, confused, and unsure of themselves, without anyone to talk to about what happened. As rumors start flying around the school, David must try to make things right (if he can) and Sammie must learn to speak up about what’s been done to her.


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A heartfelt and powerful debut novel for fans of Erin Entrada Kelly and John David Anderson, Thats What Friends Do is a book for anyone learning how to have the hard conversations about feelings, boundaries, and what it means to be a true friend. Samantha Goldstein and David Fisher have been friends ever since they met on their towns Little League baseball team. But when A heartfelt and powerful debut novel for fans of Erin Entrada Kelly and John David Anderson, That’s What Friends Do is a book for anyone learning how to have the hard conversations about feelings, boundaries, and what it means to be a true friend. Samantha Goldstein and David Fisher have been friends ever since they met on their town’s Little League baseball team. But when a new kid named Luke starts hanging out with them, what was a comfortable pair becomes an awkward trio. Luke’s comments make Sammie feel uncomfortable—but all David sees is how easily Luke flirts with Sammie, and so David decides to finally make a move on the friend he’s always had a crush on. Soon things go all wrong and too far, and Sammie and David are both left feeling hurt, confused, and unsure of themselves, without anyone to talk to about what happened. As rumors start flying around the school, David must try to make things right (if he can) and Sammie must learn to speak up about what’s been done to her.

30 review for That's What Friends Do

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Wow. This book is exactly what I needed when I was in 5th-6th grade. Cathleen Barnhart touches on much needed themes such as #metoo, consent, bullying, harmful gossiping, outgrowing friendships, female camaraderie, toxic masculinityall laid out on the page with sensitivity and nuance. The story is told in alternating POVs, between Sammie and Davidbest friends torn apart by Luke, a new boy in school and an incident on the school bus. The alternating POVs really work in showing how one single Wow. This book is exactly what I needed when I was in 5th-6th grade. Cathleen Barnhart touches on much needed themes such as #metoo, consent, bullying, harmful gossiping, outgrowing friendships, female camaraderie, toxic masculinity—all laid out on the page with sensitivity and nuance. The story is told in alternating POVs, between Sammie and David—best friends torn apart by Luke, a new boy in school and an incident on the school bus. The alternating POVs really work in showing how one single action can lead to a string of actions—actions which can often have irreversible consequences. Something as simple as stealing a French fry from someone's plate without permission, invading one's personal space, can sour even the best of friendships. One of the plot points that I really appreciated, was how Sammie comes to realize that sometimes, girls/women can only really, truly feel safe with other women, and that there is nothing wrong with choosing to embrace that safety net. I would highly recommend THAT'S WHAT FRIENDS DO as a must-read for both girls and boys, and hope that it finds its way into many classrooms, and many, many discussions.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Arianne Costner

    Literally could not put this one down! Teenage me wouldve loved this, and adult me did as well! Theres lots of exciting drama/misunderstandings, and the characters feel so real they jump right off the page. The alternating point of view works great to show how both characters see the same situations in such different ways. No one is vilified, rather, we are able to see where things went wrong and what should have been done to fix it. Lots of complexity and depth. This is such a timely book, and Literally could not put this one down! Teenage me would’ve loved this, and adult me did as well! There’s lots of exciting drama/misunderstandings, and the characters feel so real they jump right off the page. The alternating point of view works great to show how both characters see the same situations in such different ways. No one is vilified, rather, we are able to see where things went wrong and what should have been done to fix it. Lots of complexity and depth. This is such a timely book, and a great conversation starter about boundaries and respect. I especially loved that although the parents in the book are quite flawed, the relationships with their children begin to mend at the end in a very touching way. I laughed, I cried, I absolutely recommend this. As a former educator, it felt very authentic

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Davids

    I loved this book! As a middle school educator, I have been waiting for a book that will open a conversation about consent and boundaries. This book does this so well for younger teens, but also goes deeper in to the implications of our actions on our friends and loved ones. By offering alternating perspectives of two narrators, Sammie and David, it is also easy for the reader to see how misunderstandings between friends get started and perpetuated. A secondary story line focuses on the kids' I loved this book! As a middle school educator, I have been waiting for a book that will open a conversation about consent and boundaries. This book does this so well for younger teens, but also goes deeper in to the implications of our actions on our friends and loved ones. By offering alternating perspectives of two narrators, Sammie and David, it is also easy for the reader to see how misunderstandings between friends get started and perpetuated. A secondary story line focuses on the kids' struggles with finding their voices with their parents. Overall, this is a great read for students in Grades 6-8, their parents, and teachers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

    This is a really good examination of how confusing friendship, attraction, teasing, and gender roles are - especially in middle school. There were many things to like here - including the alternating perspectives, the range of issues and how they subtly influence each other (i.e. no one thing stands on its own - its always part of the bigger picture), and how the parental attitudes carry on (or dont) in the kids. There were a few moments that honestly really got to me. Very well done. This is a really good examination of how confusing friendship, attraction, teasing, and gender roles are - especially in middle school. There were many things to like here - including the alternating perspectives, the range of issues and how they subtly influence each other (i.e. no one thing stands on its own - it’s always part of the bigger picture), and how the parental attitudes carry on (or don’t) in the kids. There were a few moments that honestly really got to me. Very well done.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    This was SO good. Middle grade novels continue to rule and this is a must read. Sammie's and David's stories of being best friends and wanting to be more and knowing how to do that and developing their identities was just spot on. There are so many things that are so well done without being overwhelming or reaching. My only quibble is that I wish the author had labeled what was happening to Sammie as sexual harassment or even just harassment because that's absolutely what it was. The whole "boys This was SO good. Middle grade novels continue to rule and this is a must read. Sammie's and David's stories of being best friends and wanting to be more and knowing how to do that and developing their identities was just spot on. There are so many things that are so well done without being overwhelming or reaching. My only quibble is that I wish the author had labeled what was happening to Sammie as sexual harassment or even just harassment because that's absolutely what it was. The whole "boys will be boys" culture needs to die a fiery death and hopefully kids growing up now are realizing this more and more. Books like this certainly help.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Sammie and David have been good friends ever since the girls in her class started avoiding Sammie because she didn't share their growing interest in clothes and makeup. Sammie has even gone so far as to play baseball instead of softball, mainly because her father doesn't think that softball is a "real" sport. When Luke moves to town, David's mother makes him hang out with the new boy. David is intrigued by Luke's ease with girls, especially since David is starting E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Sammie and David have been good friends ever since the girls in her class started avoiding Sammie because she didn't share their growing interest in clothes and makeup. Sammie has even gone so far as to play baseball instead of softball, mainly because her father doesn't think that softball is a "real" sport. When Luke moves to town, David's mother makes him hang out with the new boy. David is intrigued by Luke's ease with girls, especially since David is starting to feel as if he likes Sammie more romantically than as a friend. As David spends more time with Luke, Sammie is at loose ends. Her parents are super busy, and her older sisters are interested in high school things, so she starts to talk to the girl softball players a bit and finds they aren't so bad. Luke seems to have an interest in Sammie, but it's more predatory than friendly. He eggs David and other boys on to try to kiss or touch Sammie, which mortifies her. The other girls rally around her, and talk to her about how it isn't right for her to have to put up with this kind of behavior. Her sisters help with her father and the softball team. When a terrifying incident occurs, Sammie has to confront both Luke and David and find a way to make them understand, but also a way to be friends with them again. Strengths: This is very timely, and has well developed characters who are all confused about a variety of things. I liked that Sammie was very sure of who she was and the things she enjoyed, David had to work at his father's business, and that Luke, for all his idiocy, has his sympathetic side. The family dynamics are very welcome; most middle grade readers have families they have to deal with, and just ordinary, everyday interactions can be fraught. I also liked that David and Sammie had different interests that started to pull them apart. The inclusion of a little bit of Jewish culture was also a nice touch. Weaknesses: The alternating viewpoints made this very confusing, and the characters all had their moments of being unlikable. What I really think: Debating. I really liked Dee's Maybe He Just Likes You, and certainly it's good to have books that help students process this sort of thing, but unlike Dee's book, I didn't feel that I had a good understanding of all three characters at the end of the book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richies Picks: THATS WHAT FRIENDS DO by Cathleen Barnhart, HarperCollins, January 2020, 352p., ISBN: 978-0-06-288893-8 SAMMIE: So, first because hes funny. But also because hes nice. Funny and nice. Okay, scratch all of that. David Fischer is my best friend because five minutes after I walk into my dark, silent home on the first day of a very long winter vacation, he texts me and asks, Want to come over? You can tell me more about your goals for vacation and I can make fun of you. I look at the Richie’s Picks: THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS DO by Cathleen Barnhart, HarperCollins, January 2020, 352p., ISBN: 978-0-06-288893-8 SAMMIE: “So, first because he’s funny. But also because he’s nice. Funny and nice. Okay, scratch all of that. David Fischer is my best friend because five minutes after I walk into my dark, silent home on the first day of a very long winter vacation, he texts me and asks, Want to come over? You can tell me more about your goals for vacation and I can make fun of you. I look at the clock on the microwave. Dad’s still at the office and won’t be home for hours. My mother’s probably showing houses, so who knows when she’ll appear. And Rachel and Becca, aka the Peas, are guaranteed to be MIA until after dinner because they’re in high school, and presidents of half the student clubs. Sure, I text back. When? David asks Leaving in 15. Then I have a great idea: Meet me at the fort! I’ll bring snacks.” DAVID: “Meet me at the fort! Sammie says. With an exclamation point. ‘Ugh,’ I say out loud. The Fort is our special place, our secret, so I get why Sammie wants to meet there. But it’s not a real fort, just a giant cement drainage tunnel underneath the Greenway. In the summer, it is always cooler than outside. Which is nice. In the summer. Today, when the weather app says forty degrees, the Fort will be freezing, and probably dark, but we’ll be alone there. And maybe we’ll have to huddle together for warmth, and maybe-- I text back and say okay to Sammie’s crazy Fort idea. Then I head to the bathroom, brush my teeth, and spritz some of Pop’s Binaca breath spray in my mouth just in case I stare at myself in the mirror, focusing on my eyes, which are at least green and are the least embarrassing part of my face. ‘Sammie,’ I say, pretending the green eyes in the mirror are her brown ones. ‘There’s something I want to tell you, about my feelings for--blech!’ I shake my head no and try again, pretending I’m holding a cup of hot chocolate. ‘Mmm, this hot chocolate is sweet and creamy, just like you.’ No way. I try again, putting one hand on a hip to look cool and relaxed. ‘Hey, Sammie, there’s something I want to tell you--’ ‘Who’re you talking to?’ I jump, startled, and bite my tongue. Inez, my babysitter. is standing at the bathroom door, holding a bunch of folded towels. ‘Who’s in here with you?’ she asks. ‘Inezzz,’ I whine. ‘You made me bite my tongue.’ Inez makes a pfft sound. ‘I didn’t make you do anything. The door was open. I was heading to put away these clean towels, which I just washed and dried and folded, thank you very much, and I hear you in here, talking. Who’re you talking to?’ ‘Not you,’ I say, my tongue throbbing. Inez steps further into the bathroom and looks around. ‘Who then?’ ‘No one,’ I say. I was just...practicing.’” David and Sammie are seventh graders. They have been best friends since playing on the same Little League team in kindergarten. They both seem to be good students, but David enjoys needling his friend over her obsession to get her work done. After a half a century-plus, I retain vivid recollections of how tough seventh grade was socially: A new school. Changing classes. Hundreds of unfamiliar kids, with a dozen elementary schools feeding into the junior high. Big kids slamming me into lockers for no reason or knocking my looseleaf and textbooks out from under my arm in the stairwell. And boys and girls walking around school holding hands. I was so not in that place in seventh grade. And neither is Sammie. It’s sweet to overhear David working up the nerve to tell Sammie that he likes her in that way. But how will the pressures and urges of adolescence affect the relationship between these longtime bffs? It’s tough to recall another coming-of-age tale that portrays the utter sense of loss encountered in THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS DO. One may argue that it’s simply natural and necessary for puberty to fuel transitions in boy-girl relationships. But whether one blames what ultimately happens between these friends on the media and popular culture, on a middle school bullying culture, or simply on hormones, I found this to be a heartbreaking story. Their friendship becomes strained because of another boy. A family friend, Luke has been an occasional visitor to David’s house. But then he transfers to David and Sammie’s school and starts hanging out with them. He even plans to go out for the school baseball team, along with Sammie and David. Plenty of the junior high girls think Luke’s hot. Luke’s growing interest in Sammie, although unreciprocated, leads David to a greater sense of urgency to have his best friend also be his girlfriend. It climaxes with David’s part-deliberate, part-accidental, and incredibly awkward behavior on the school bus which causes a schism between him and Sammie. The damage to their friendship does scab over but never really heals. In the long run, David ends up becoming more friendly with Luke and a group of guys, and Sammie develops a new, female, best friend. In large measure, the loss has to do with David’s shortcomings. He initially seems like a great friend to Sammie, but he does something he shouldn’t, and is thoroughly clueless about how badly he’s hurt her. David’s failure to gain her consent before acting, brings a powerful #MeToo aspect to the story. Instead of ineptly coming on to Sammie, David could have talked to her about his feelings and asked whether she was also interested in him in that way. Having failed that, he could have apologized for his behavior, and shared his feelings. But he takes neither of these paths and comes off as a thoughtless creep. THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS DO is not a neat and tidy tale, but it’s a compulsive read that has kept me thinking long after turning the last page. I’d like to get this story into the hands of fifth through seventh graders, and hear their reactions. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  8. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Wildenstein

    An important story about friendship between boys and girls at the delicate start of teenage-hood. I really enjoyed how this story was told. David and Sammie were great characters with interesting POVs that both me and my kids could relate to. Barnhart does a great job of adding dabs of everyday life to make a hard subject (#metoo) more palatable.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karinasulaiman

    I wish I had the opportunity to read this when I was in middle school. Relevant and nuanced, it highlights a multitude of issues faced by kids in school, managing to present different and sometimes opposing perspectives to the reader, keeping them engaged and informed at the same time. A must-read not just for its target audience but also for anyone who interacts with them in a meaningful way. Teachers, parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles, nannies and sitters, I'm looking at you. Head I wish I had the opportunity to read this when I was in middle school. Relevant and nuanced, it highlights a multitude of issues faced by kids in school, managing to present different and sometimes opposing perspectives to the reader, keeping them engaged and informed at the same time. A must-read not just for its target audience but also for anyone who interacts with them in a meaningful way. Teachers, parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles, nannies and sitters, I'm looking at you. Head to the to store and get your copy. Looking forward to your next one Cathleen Barnhart!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Celesta Rimington

    I was lucky enough to read an Advance Edition of this book, and I wish it had been available when I was twelve. Cathleen Barnhart has written an important and tender story about friendship, boundaries, seeing things from another's perspective, and finding your voice even when it's difficult. For anyone who has had (a) #metoo experience(s), there is understanding and validation within these pages. Cathleen shows the truth of growing up and navigating challenges that arise within families and I was lucky enough to read an Advance Edition of this book, and I wish it had been available when I was twelve. Cathleen Barnhart has written an important and tender story about friendship, boundaries, seeing things from another's perspective, and finding your voice even when it's difficult. For anyone who has had (a) #metoo experience(s), there is understanding and validation within these pages. Cathleen shows the truth of growing up and navigating challenges that arise within families and among friends and peers with an honest, but gentle, hand that lets the reader feel safe within the pages. This story shows the difficulties of being the new kid, changing friend dynamics, and loneliness. It addresses the harm of gossiping, lying, and crossing boundaries, but it is told in dual perspective and shows the sides that often go misunderstood. Many readers will feel heard and, perhaps, a little braver to speak the truth, do the right thing, and ask for help whenever they need it. I highly recommend this book to middle grade readers, teens, and adults, because my adult self needed it just as much as my twelve-year-old self did. Readers will come away from this story with a better understanding of what it truly means to be a friend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Before reading this book, which bravely broaches the topics of bullying and inappropriate treatment of girls, I thought Id be left with a total girl power feeling. And there is an element of that in the book. Like it says here on Goodreads: A heartfelt and powerful debut novel...Thats What Friends Do is a book for anyone learning how to have the hard conversations about feelings, boundaries, and what it means to be a true friend. . It handles all of these topics well, showing how to communicate Before reading this book, which bravely broaches the topics of bullying and inappropriate treatment of girls, I thought I’d be left with a “total girl power” feeling. And there is an element of that in the book. Like it says here on Goodreads: “A heartfelt and powerful debut novel...That’s What Friends Do is a book for anyone learning how to have the hard conversations about feelings, boundaries, and what it means to be a true friend.” . It handles all of these topics well, showing how to communicate and have courage when things are tough at school and in relationships. But most importantly, this book left me thinking of the importance of intentional parenting and communication. . With so many little girls in our family, I tend to just assume my boys are ok. This book was a wake up call. Yes, girls are treated poorly in the world and in schools. Yes, they need to learn how to stand up for themselves, and to be strong and independent women. But the message I got was that our boys aren’t learning some essential life-lessons. How else are my boys going to know how to act with their friends, how to treat girls, or how to someday be the kinds of husbands and fathers they need to be unless my husband and I teach them and model it for them? We don’t need to empower women by putting down men and boys. We need to inspire both to elevate their behavior. You can still respect women while being a good, bold, strong man. Call me old-fashioned!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Feraco

    Cathleen Barnhart has written an engaging, moving story about two friends, Sammie and David, who have played baseball together all their lives and whose friendship dynamic is shattered when a new kid, Luke, joins their school. David, an insecure, artistic boy with a crush on Sammie, feels like he needs to emulate charismatic, would-be playboy Luke, whose forward advances and aggressive harassment (which he and the other boys see as "flirting") make Sammie deeply uncomfortable. Grown ups and even Cathleen Barnhart has written an engaging, moving story about two friends, Sammie and David, who have played baseball together all their lives and whose friendship dynamic is shattered when a new kid, Luke, joins their school. David, an insecure, artistic boy with a crush on Sammie, feels like he needs to emulate charismatic, would-be playboy Luke, whose forward advances and aggressive harassment (which he and the other boys see as "flirting") make Sammie deeply uncomfortable. Grown ups and even Sammie's older sisters don't seem to understand just how bad Luke makes Sammie feel, nor does David understand how complicit he is in falling under peer influence and alienating people he cares about. Both students deal with filial expectations that are, at their core, unfairly gendered (David pressured to be athletic, his art not taken seriously, and Sammie pressured to play baseball because to her father, "girls softball" isn't a "serious sport") and find ways to free themselves from those confines. It's resonant and teaches important lessons about perspective and the need telling the truth all without being preachy or simplistic. Barnhart understands and trusts middle school students; the way she writes is clear she holds the upmost respect for them and for the world they live in.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Risa Nyman

    Thats What Friends Do is the perfect coming of age story for todays tweens. Cathleen Barnhart has tackled the heavy issue of me-too encounters in a poignant and realistic way as it impacts middle school kids. The confusion that comes from innocence and insecurity is heart-wrenching. Ms. Barnharts brilliant decision to write this story in both a girls and a boys point of view makes it even more compelling and important. This story isnt simple. Its twists and its unpredictability make it That’s What Friends Do is the perfect coming of age story for today’s tweens. Cathleen Barnhart has tackled the heavy issue of me-too encounters in a poignant and realistic way as it impacts middle school kids. The confusion that comes from innocence and insecurity is heart-wrenching. Ms. Barnhart’s brilliant decision to write this story in both a girl’s and a boy’s point of view makes it even more compelling and important. This story isn’t simple. Its twists and its unpredictability make it impossible to put it down. The baseball and softball metaphors for kids searching for independence as they learn to follow their passions no matter what is spot on. By the end of this book, the reader knows Sammie and David quite well and will remember them for a long time. I predict that this will be one of those books widely read by all kids so they can discuss with their friends these realistic, beautifully-drawn characters and similar, difficult situations they might have faced or will face. Thank you for writing this important story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really wanted to give this book a higher rating, but there's a whole story line involving sexual assault that I thought was inappropriate in a middle grade novel. Unfortunately, I'm sure that many girls will have similar experiences to what is described, but clueless parents and unsupportive friends just weren't what I found in junior high and not what I want Anna to think is normal. I do think it's important for her to learn about consent, boundaries, and what to do if you are assaulted, but I really wanted to give this book a higher rating, but there's a whole story line involving sexual assault that I thought was inappropriate in a middle grade novel. Unfortunately, I'm sure that many girls will have similar experiences to what is described, but clueless parents and unsupportive friends just weren't what I found in junior high and not what I want Anna to think is normal. I do think it's important for her to learn about consent, boundaries, and what to do if you are assaulted, but I don't think these are the age appropriate ways to do that. All that said, the rest of the story would be fantastic for kids learning how to navigate changing relationships with friends as you grow up, or for kids wanting to try something new and a little scary.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Lambert

    A compelling story about two seventh grade best friends navigating the complexities of middle school friendship, first crushes, learning to embrace who you are, and consent. We get to view the story from the alternating points of view of the main boy and main girl, so we see the misunderstandings and choices unfold in such an authentic way. Its a page-turning story full of relatable characters, but it also contains valuable lessons, and I will be sharing this book with my two daughters when they A compelling story about two seventh grade best friends navigating the complexities of middle school friendship, first crushes, learning to embrace who you are, and consent. We get to view the story from the alternating points of view of the main boy and main girl, so we see the misunderstandings and choices unfold in such an authentic way. It’s a page-turning story full of relatable characters, but it also contains valuable lessons, and I will be sharing this book with my two daughters when they’re a bit older.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lalani

    The way the characters' experiences were described and the empathy I felt for them made me uncomfortable. A good uncomfortable - a "this feels like middle school" uncomfortable so for me as a parent it was a good reminder to step into the feelings and lives of seventh graders. Reading this will strengthen my empathy. I will hand this to my middle schooler and use it for our conversations about consent and friends.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This is a beautifully written story that felt quite real to me. The characters are likable and each struggles in their own way to navigate an increasingly complicated world. Because it is written from alternating points of view, it is easy to understand how the situation between Sammie and David develops. I was hooked from the first page!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Stinemetz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There were parts of this story I appreciated, such as Sammie's mom telling her that none of the touching that happened by Luke and David was her fault. However, I feel that Luke's mental health was used as an excuse for his behavior towards Sammie. His character's actions felt very unresolved for me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Bass

    A great read and a relevant story. I couldn't put it down. These kids, their attitudes and their problems are so real. When I finished reading it, I started reading it again, because the writing is so delicious and it was fun to look at the character development and the unfolding events through the lens of 20-20 hindsight.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Excellent and important read for this time in our country, an important introduction for young people to consent and navigating the friend/crush divide. Not an easy topic but one that often goes undiscussed and ought not to be

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emerson

    So honest. Loved this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Ingham

    I really enjoyed this book and wish I had it to read when I was younger!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Pavia

    Such a heartbreaking and beautiful book! I wish I had something like this when I was in middle school, but I'm glad students will have it now.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ellie M

    Finally a female character actually realizing that just because many girls like something, it's not less than!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lily Wyro

    Loved it 😮

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    Full of kindness and also sadness.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Hnatiuk

    Review to follow

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Mean girls and doofy pushy boys combine to make Sammie pretty unhappy. This is why no adult would want to relive this age.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This is hands-down the best IM book I have ever read. "That's What Friends Do" perfectly captures what it feels like to be trapped in a situation you don't understand and don't know how to escape. Parents and kids need to read this story. The main character is a young girl who can't understand why her best friend or the new guy or ANY guys in her life are starting to find excuses to touch her, but she doesn't like it. She doesn't know if it's something that she's misunderstanding or if it's This is hands-down the best IM book I have ever read. "That's What Friends Do" perfectly captures what it feels like to be trapped in a situation you don't understand and don't know how to escape. Parents and kids need to read this story. The main character is a young girl who can't understand why her best friend or the new guy or ANY guys in her life are starting to find excuses to touch her, but she doesn't like it. She doesn't know if it's something that she's misunderstanding or if it's wrong, but either way, she doesn't know how to find the words to tell her parents. This book goes so deep into the middle-grade mind and will teach readers how to find boundaries, mend friendships, and ask for help when they need it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Park

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