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Lucifer Vol. 1: The Infernal Comedy

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One of four books expanding Neil Gaiman's acclaimed Sandman Universe. The onetime ruler of Hell has gone missing. Lucifer is MIA. He finds himself imprisoned and crippled by mysterious forces who seek to torment him for their own terrible ends. He also happens to have no idea how he got there. This is the one true tale of what befell the Prince of Lies, the Bringer of Li One of four books expanding Neil Gaiman's acclaimed Sandman Universe. The onetime ruler of Hell has gone missing. Lucifer is MIA. He finds himself imprisoned and crippled by mysterious forces who seek to torment him for their own terrible ends. He also happens to have no idea how he got there. This is the one true tale of what befell the Prince of Lies, the Bringer of Light--Lucifer. The blind, destitute old man, who lives in a small boarding house in a quiet little town, where nothing is quite what it seems and no one can leave. He's trapped, you see? Trapped in a bizarre prison with no memory of how he got there or why. He has no recollection of setting out to find his offspring. He also does not remember that if he does not find him it could be the end of all things. Meanwhile, in Los Angeles, a cop who may have brain cancer is tasked with a mission. Find and Kill Lucifer. From crime and mystery author Dan Watters (The Shadow, Deep Roots) with art from Max Fiumara and Sebastian Fiumara (Abe Sapien, The Amazing Spider-Man, All-Star Batman) bring us the next chapter in the story everyone's favorite son of God. The Sandman Universe is a new series of books curated by Neil Gaiman for DC Vertigo. Conjuring epic storytelling and immersing readers into the evolving world of the Dreaming, The Sandman Universe begins anew with four new ongoing series, existing in a shared universe, building upon Gaiman's New York Times best-selling series that lyrically weaved together stories of dreams and magic. Collects Lucifer #1-6 and Sandman Universe Special #1


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One of four books expanding Neil Gaiman's acclaimed Sandman Universe. The onetime ruler of Hell has gone missing. Lucifer is MIA. He finds himself imprisoned and crippled by mysterious forces who seek to torment him for their own terrible ends. He also happens to have no idea how he got there. This is the one true tale of what befell the Prince of Lies, the Bringer of Li One of four books expanding Neil Gaiman's acclaimed Sandman Universe. The onetime ruler of Hell has gone missing. Lucifer is MIA. He finds himself imprisoned and crippled by mysterious forces who seek to torment him for their own terrible ends. He also happens to have no idea how he got there. This is the one true tale of what befell the Prince of Lies, the Bringer of Light--Lucifer. The blind, destitute old man, who lives in a small boarding house in a quiet little town, where nothing is quite what it seems and no one can leave. He's trapped, you see? Trapped in a bizarre prison with no memory of how he got there or why. He has no recollection of setting out to find his offspring. He also does not remember that if he does not find him it could be the end of all things. Meanwhile, in Los Angeles, a cop who may have brain cancer is tasked with a mission. Find and Kill Lucifer. From crime and mystery author Dan Watters (The Shadow, Deep Roots) with art from Max Fiumara and Sebastian Fiumara (Abe Sapien, The Amazing Spider-Man, All-Star Batman) bring us the next chapter in the story everyone's favorite son of God. The Sandman Universe is a new series of books curated by Neil Gaiman for DC Vertigo. Conjuring epic storytelling and immersing readers into the evolving world of the Dreaming, The Sandman Universe begins anew with four new ongoing series, existing in a shared universe, building upon Gaiman's New York Times best-selling series that lyrically weaved together stories of dreams and magic. Collects Lucifer #1-6 and Sandman Universe Special #1

30 review for Lucifer Vol. 1: The Infernal Comedy

  1. 4 out of 5

    MischaS_

    ***Advance Review Copy generously provided through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Okay, let me tell you that this confused me, a lot. At first, I had to download this book like five times because I thought that I was doing something wrong. That was not Lucifer but Sandman! However, after reading some reviews, I realised that really one-quarter of this Lucifer Volume is about Sandman, which I mostly skipped because I read it just recently. I have to say that I know Sandman ***Advance Review Copy generously provided through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Okay, let me tell you that this confused me, a lot. At first, I had to download this book like five times because I thought that I was doing something wrong. That was not Lucifer but Sandman! However, after reading some reviews, I realised that really one-quarter of this Lucifer Volume is about Sandman, which I mostly skipped because I read it just recently. I have to say that I know Sandman way better than I do know Lucifer, but I still managed to get what was going on fairly quickly. But I was not invested in the story until the last 20 pages or so. Plus my everlasting issue with Lucifer stories is that since I'm not a native speaker, I have a very, very hard time grasping what Mazikeen is saying.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I’ve never read the Mike Carey Lucifer series or seen the TV show (and I’ll probably never do either now) so I don’t know if it’s because I’m so unfamiliar with the character and his story (couldn’t tell you if this is a continuation of the previous books or a reboot) or whether Dan Watters is just that incompetent a storyteller but I had absolutely no fucking idea what was going on in Lucifer, Volume 1: The Infernal Comedy! It’s not a good sign when you get to the end of the book, read the blur I’ve never read the Mike Carey Lucifer series or seen the TV show (and I’ll probably never do either now) so I don’t know if it’s because I’m so unfamiliar with the character and his story (couldn’t tell you if this is a continuation of the previous books or a reboot) or whether Dan Watters is just that incompetent a storyteller but I had absolutely no fucking idea what was going on in Lucifer, Volume 1: The Infernal Comedy! It’s not a good sign when you get to the end of the book, read the blurb and don’t recognise the summary as reflective of what you’ve just read! I got that Lucifer was no longer King of Hell for some reason but apparently his kid will prevent the end of the world? If you say so, Vertigo marketing department! There’s also a Philip K. Dick-looking LAPD cop embroiled in this mess but even the blurb can’t explain why! His wife dies and he has a breakdown which enables him to see demons for no reason? How and why he’s singled out in the first place is beyond me. Dude does nothing as well - a total waste of space character! There are apparently conspiracies to kill Lucifer but, again, don’t know why. It gets worse. We see Lucifer as this broken, weak, homeless-looking dude who’s obviously in a bad way - but he’s also a David Bowie-looking dude who’s got his shit together? So… does he need to regain control of Hell or doesn’t he? One version of him needs help, the other seems to be ok. Was Lucifer always two people? Ah, who cares? It’s not like I’m gonna keep reading this title! Into the mix is William Blake, because why not, and one character with a Phantom of the Opera mask who talksh indecihpehbly liksh thsh fer het whleo tme and it’s so fucking annoying to read. Actually, the other characters talk clearly and they’re only slightly less annoying to read - that’s how awful the writing is! An unrelentingly bad, incomprehensible and boring book from cover to cover, the latest ill-conceived Sandman Universe title is definitely the worst comic of 2019 I’ve read so far - abandon all hope ye who pick up this crap!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This book was so decompressed it bored me to tears. The first several issues just seemed to be random things happening with no connection, although it sort of eventually came together. Of course, by that point I'd already given up on this garbage. The book also apparently has very little connection to any of the previous series (Mahzikeen does appear but does nothing.) or to Lucifer from the Sandman comics to which I say "Screw you, DC." The art was solid though. Received a review copy from DC/>Received This book was so decompressed it bored me to tears. The first several issues just seemed to be random things happening with no connection, although it sort of eventually came together. Of course, by that point I'd already given up on this garbage. The book also apparently has very little connection to any of the previous series (Mahzikeen does appear but does nothing.) or to Lucifer from the Sandman comics to which I say "Screw you, DC." The art was solid though. Received a review copy from DC and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Fran

    An excellent new chapter in Lucifer's story. This one comes as part of the Sandman's Universe new series. The creative team behind Lucifer Vol. 1 – The Infernal Comedy is a large one (even when compared to the original series). The writers behind this volume are Dan Watters, Neil Gaiman, Simon Spurrier, Kat Howard, and Nalo Hopkinson. Lettering is delivered by Steve Wands and Simon Bowland, and colors by Dave McCaig and Mat Lopes, with art credits for Max and Sebastian Fiumara, Bilquis Evely, Tom Fowl An excellent new chapter in Lucifer's story. This one comes as part of the Sandman's Universe new series. The creative team behind Lucifer Vol. 1 – The Infernal Comedy is a large one (even when compared to the original series). The writers behind this volume are Dan Watters, Neil Gaiman, Simon Spurrier, Kat Howard, and Nalo Hopkinson. Lettering is delivered by Steve Wands and Simon Bowland, and colors by Dave McCaig and Mat Lopes, with art credits for Max and Sebastian Fiumara, Bilquis Evely, Tom Fowler, and Dominike Stanton. As in the original series, the story line of this new chapter is anything but linear, jumping in time and space, from a multiverse kind of Heaven to a very particular and desolated little village, where Lucifer is now an old, blind man. Developed from a mix of Christian mythology, some Shakespeare and a lot of Sandman's style narrative flair, the plot is suspenseful, bloody and intelligent, with a lot of satire, hence a proper one for none other than the Devil, Mr. Lucifer Morningstar. One of the great things about this jumping time-line is that the artistic design, while not the drawing itself, adapts to the fragment of story we found ourselves in, reflecting the state and even the personality of the characters involved in that fragment. This allows for a gorgeous display of styles, with color pallets reflecting moods and worlds, from the blues and greens of an old folks home (that it's all but a old folks home); to the oranges and browns of a decrepit island that could be Elba but is instead populated by souls unaware of their exile, and a vibrant multicolored place that it's as much Heaven as it is Hell. There are many things to like about this Infernal Comedy, however the story may seem a little convoluted at first, mostly because it opens with a sequence about the Dreaming which importance we only get to appreciate (and fully understand) later. Importantly, for those unfamiliar with Gaiman's Sandman Universe, following the story will require extra patience, but it's well worth the effort. Along the volume, as we get to see Lucifer present situation--after his father has left creation--the pace quickens forcing us to pay attention or else missing out a crucial detail. In that sense, this new book maintains one of the most successful aspects of the original series: the need, not only the pleasure, for total immersion in order to get everything there's on the pages to get. All things considered, this new chapter in Lucifer's story is a great start to this ongoing series and a good entry point for new readers, unfamiliar with story of this character, while it's also a great return to the character for preexisting fans.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Devann

    I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley. I should have known after the summary started with "This is the ~one true tale~ of what befell the Prince of Lies" that it was going to be like this, but I had to give it a chance. I was going to call it a DNF after issue 3, but then I decided to at least look at the artwork for the rest of the issues and I ended up reading about the last half of issue 6 so I guess I read slightly more than half of this comic. From what some other reviewers are s I received an ARC copy of this book from NetGalley. I should have known after the summary started with "This is the ~one true tale~ of what befell the Prince of Lies" that it was going to be like this, but I had to give it a chance. I was going to call it a DNF after issue 3, but then I decided to at least look at the artwork for the rest of the issues and I ended up reading about the last half of issue 6 so I guess I read slightly more than half of this comic. From what some other reviewers are saying I don't think it would have made much more sense if I had read the whole thing. Mostly I just don't understand why they felt the need to entirely reboot the Lucifer character, and if they were going to then why do it in this way. Not only did I have next to no idea what was actually happening, but Lucifer was not a compelling or likable main character in this AT ALL (and yeah I know, he's Lucifer, but even when he was doing awful things in the original you were still always rooting for him at least a bit). I suppose if you have never read the original Lucifer series by Mike Carey then you may find some value in this, but I found it pretentious and convoluted. It is possible that it will get better in the next issue because a lot of the things I hated about the majority of this volume seem to be resolved at the very end, but the original Lucifer series is pretty much the best graphic novel series I have ever read and I don't see why they felt the need to erase all of that instead of continuing on from the end of it. They could have easily ignored the shortly rebooted series from 2016, but to ignore Carey's work and take Lucifer back to only his Sandman beginnings is like saying we should all give up cars and go back to horse drawn carriages. Ridiculous.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    I was so pleasantly surprised by The Dreaming Vol. 1: Pathways and Emanations that I kind of got my hopes up too much for this one. Yeah, the new Lucifer book is not very good and I’m really not sure why — I didn’t get through Mike Carey’s run, nor did I read any other reboots of the series, so I can’t say if my confusion comes from not being familiar with previous material or if it’s just a sloppily written book by itself. Either way, I really can’t tell what happened in this volume. It’s kind of a shame I was so pleasantly surprised by The Dreaming Vol. 1: Pathways and Emanations that I kind of got my hopes up too much for this one. Yeah, the new Lucifer book is not very good and I’m really not sure why — I didn’t get through Mike Carey’s run, nor did I read any other reboots of the series, so I can’t say if my confusion comes from not being familiar with previous material or if it’s just a sloppily written book by itself. Either way, I really can’t tell what happened in this volume. It’s kind of a shame really, because for the first few issues I was at least digging the story of a guy who lost his wife and had a brain tumor — a sort of Lovecraftian descent-into-madness type of horror story that didn’t feel original but was still very atmospheric and overall not that bad. Then that storyline went some places that I cannot explain. Lucifer’s storyline, on the other hand, was confusing and messy throughout, which is really not good in a book where he’s supposed to be the main character. So yeah, I’d say skip this one, but definitely get The Dreaming instead.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Disclaimer: I received a free ecopy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The story was kind of boring. It never grabbed my attention enough to care about what was happening. The art was good though.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    I got this volume as an eARC along with Volume One of The Dreaming , which means I sampled half of the new Sandman Universe story arcs released to celebrate the series' 30th anniversary. Lucifer Morningstar was one of my favorite original Sandman characters, even though he only plays a pretty minor role in the original run. DC went on to create a quite successful spin-off around his character, and I guess that must be required reading, because I'm not familiar with it and honestly have no idea what I got this volume as an eARC along with Volume One of The Dreaming , which means I sampled half of the new Sandman Universe story arcs released to celebrate the series' 30th anniversary. Lucifer Morningstar was one of my favorite original Sandman characters, even though he only plays a pretty minor role in the original run. DC went on to create a quite successful spin-off around his character, and I guess that must be required reading, because I'm not familiar with it and honestly have no idea what the fuck I just read. The summary at the back of the volume says that Lucifer's son Caliban is the only one who can "prevent the end of the world"... but there are absolutely no allusions in these pages that suggest that the world is in need of saving? What? Lucifer is no longer Lord of Hell, but a destitute beggar with no recollection of how he ended up in that position, trapped and tormented... in some strange village surrounded by buried statues he digs out? His eyes have been picked, but he grows them back? A LAPD detective who recently lost his wife to a brain tumor is trying to make sense of some secrets she seems to have kept during their marriage... he ends up with a brain tumor too, which enables him to see demons, and he decides he must kill Lucifer because of it, I guess? There's also a witch coven that needs a third, a mother, to be complete, William Blake is involved for some reason, and some guy Lucifer tricked and damned to eternity outside of Heaven or Hell who is now out for revenge? Oh, and the mysterious village turns out to be on the skull of the witch Sycorax, mother of Caliban? That just now may have possibly been a major plot spoiler, but since I was completely lost while reading this, I couldn't tell you with any certainty. I also think that there must have been some sort of flashbacks through-out, because Lucifer repeatedly goes from looking like an unkempt homeless man to a chiseled David Bowie? I honestly don't know if Watters is a lousy story-teller or if he just throws the reader in the deep-end, assuming one's familiar with all the spin-off material, which is why I'm having a really hard time rating this—I may just have been the entirely wrong audience for it, not familiar with enough character backstory, William Blake poetry, mythology and/or Shakespeare plays to "get it". The art was very nice, but I didn't enjoy reading this, it was a convoluted mess of a story that made no sense to me and offered no satisfying pay-off at the end. I doubt that I'll check out the rest of the Sandman Universe story arcs after this. ————— All my book reviews can be found here · Buy on BookDepository

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    The Second, (and Possibly Best), of the Four New Sandman Universe Series O.K., here's the deal as I understand it. There are four new series that are spinoffs of Neil Gaiman's Sandman Universe. Each shares and expands on the Sandman Universe and is set in the "evolving" world of the Dreaming. Don't know how much Gaiman is involved, (the books are claimed to be "from the mind of...", or "curated by"), but there seem to be more and more books out there that use Gaiman's name and stories The Second, (and Possibly Best), of the Four New Sandman Universe Series O.K., here's the deal as I understand it. There are four new series that are spinoffs of Neil Gaiman's Sandman Universe. Each shares and expands on the Sandman Universe and is set in the "evolving" world of the Dreaming. Don't know how much Gaiman is involved, (the books are claimed to be "from the mind of...", or "curated by"), but there seem to be more and more books out there that use Gaiman's name and stories but in which he otherwise does not seem that much involved. I've now read the beginning of the "Dreaming" series, (Volume 1, "Pathways and Emanations"), and the beginning of the"Lucifer" series, (Volume 1, "The Infernal Comedy"). Don't be confused. While each Volume collects the first 6 issues of their respective series, each Volume also starts with the same "Sandman Universe Special #1". This Special lays the groundwork for all four of the spinoffs. At first I thought I had the same book twice over, until I realized that they were different books, but just started with the same 48 page one-shot. It appears the two other spinoff series, ("Books of Magic" and "House of Whispers"), will open the same way. The Special follows the raven Mathew as he confirms that the Dreamer has abandoned the Dreamland, and introduces and sets the stage for each of the four new series. For what it's worth, so far the Special one-shot has been my favorite part of this whole project. Each of the series has a different writer; liking or disliking one won't tell you much about the others. So, with that background, (hah! I'm doing the same opening for each series review), let's turn to "Lucifer", the second of the four new Volumes. Our theme, if we need one, is "Hope and Suffering". MILD PLOT AND PREMISE SPOILERS.We open with Lucifer trapped in a strange village-like place. He's blind and destitute, with no memory of who he is or how he got there. The story is told through a narrative in the present and lots of flashbacks, which may be a bit showy but actually works well. Basically, Lucifer has to reunite his son with the boy's mother, and figure out which character from his past has confined him to this village prison. An entirely separate story thread follows an L.A. detective caught up in some shadowy satanic conspiracy. The threads do eventually merge in a suspenseful, and even thrilling, fashion. Lots of interesting things going on. Lucifer, when he isn't agonizing, has a deadpan sense of humor. Modeling young and powerful Lucifer on David Bowie has worked for everyone who has ever done it, including Bowie, and it works very well here. Making William Blake Lucifer's sidekick of sorts is a masterstroke, since Blake's actual poetry could be right out of the Sandman Universe anyway. There are lots of heavy throwaway lines and deep observations, but more of them make sense here than seems usual. For those of a literary bent there is a lot to work with here. William Blake wrote an actual book, "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell" that addresses many of the same "contraries" that arise in this novel's fictional "Annulment of Heaven and Hell". Sycorax, Prospero, and of course Caliban, are all taken from Shakespeare's "The Tempest", a play about justice and the superiority of forgiveness over revenge. That's all fairly heavy stuff, but it is fun to have real, instead of entirely fanciful, allusions in novels like this. (And "Jack Tales" are everywhere and essential reading for any folklorist. The Stingy Jack tale in this book is an exceptionally fine version of one of the foundational Jack tales.) And so it goes; slews of literary and folktale Easter eggs hidden throughout the book. Of course, you can skip all of that if you care to, since the double-threaded story is fine as is. My upshot was that I enjoyed this much more than the first spinoff, "The Dreaming". I don't know how Sandman Universey it is, but this novel was great fun to read, rewarding on close examination, and, it almost goes without saying, a pleasure to look at. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicki Markus

    I came to this graphic novel with no prior knowledge of the Sandman universe. All I know of the character of Lucifer comes from the recent TV series, so I was interested to go back to the roots, as it were. Due to my lack of background reading, I did find the opening section a tad confusing; however, it will probably mean more to longtime fans. Once the main plot kicked off, I settled into it with ease. I enjoyed the premise and loved the ties to Shakespeare. The story moved at a good pace, with I came to this graphic novel with no prior knowledge of the Sandman universe. All I know of the character of Lucifer comes from the recent TV series, so I was interested to go back to the roots, as it were. Due to my lack of background reading, I did find the opening section a tad confusing; however, it will probably mean more to longtime fans. Once the main plot kicked off, I settled into it with ease. I enjoyed the premise and loved the ties to Shakespeare. The story moved at a good pace, with an excellent balance of images and text, and the artwork was gorgeous. It certainly left me keen to read future volumes. Although those in the know will probably take away more from this work than a newbie, the story is also accessible to those who, like me, are coming to the character and world via the television show. I received this book as a free eBook ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    3,5/5. I never read the original Sandman series so I can’t really compare them. But this one, in itself, was good. Dark universe, dark humor has well and an interesting but a bit confusing plot. Not sure I will continue exploring this universe but I’m glad I read this one!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Another in the new line of Sandman spin-offs, but one I enjoyed far more than The Dreaming; a scratchy, claustrophobic anxiety dream of a comic, with Watters' knack for stories that feel like fevers perfectly complemented by the Fiumaras' unsettling visuals. Opening with enough injury-to-the-eye motifs to get Frederic Wertham's corpse up another few hundred RPM, we find the Morningstar blinded and imprisoned in a strange town, while a second strand of the story follows a detective watching his w Another in the new line of Sandman spin-offs, but one I enjoyed far more than The Dreaming; a scratchy, claustrophobic anxiety dream of a comic, with Watters' knack for stories that feel like fevers perfectly complemented by the Fiumaras' unsettling visuals. Opening with enough injury-to-the-eye motifs to get Frederic Wertham's corpse up another few hundred RPM, we find the Morningstar blinded and imprisoned in a strange town, while a second strand of the story follows a detective watching his wife slowly fade away, medicine maintaining her life long after its quality has gone. Obviously something ties these two prisoners to each other, but what? And how about the other scenes, in which Shakespeare's Prospero merges with Poe's (well, maybe more Corman's), and Lucifer appears to be engaged in the sort of Devil-ish activities which I thought this version of the character found somewhat beneath him? True, it wobbles with the third issue: fictional 'Bill' Blakes are a lot harder to pull off than you might deduce from the number of fictional Blakes out there. And after that it never wholly recovers the sureness of the opening, but it does pull back together into a tense and curious little knot of a story, as against the floppy mess of The Dreaming. Yes, on one level, much like the previous Lucifer series, it shouldn't exist; the Lightbringer should have been allowed his final escape into the outside of everything at the end of the Carey run. But hey, this is corporate comics, and them's the breaks; there'll always be another threat Superman must vanquish, another chauvinist for Wonder Woman to take down, another cage for Lucifer. They're our saints, and that means they exist in ritual time, re-enacting their emblematic trials for as long as we need them. (Netgalley ARC)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gray

    'How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, 'I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.' But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit. Those who see 'How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, 'I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.' But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit. Those who see you stare at you, they ponder your fate: 'Is this the man who shook the earth and made kingdoms tremble, the man who made the world a wilderness, who overthrew its cities and would not let his captives go home?' [Isaiah 14:12-17] I've seen a lot of divisive reviews of this latest imagining of the bringer of light, Lucifer. I loved it. It's smart, funny, dark, chaotic, medieval, Shakespearean, gruesome, and beautifully illustrated. There's a feeling of Dante's Divine Comedy to it and I love that. It's the best of the Sandman Universe titles in my humble opinion, and the one I want to keep reading monthly.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Niklas Pivic

    This anthology of stories started taking place years after the first "Sandman" series came to an end. After that, Leslie S. Klinger annotated them, which allowed a lot of Neil Gaiman's original ruminations to be explained and clarified. History now moves on. Aided by raven Matthew, we are guided through worlds where the Prince of Sleep is, seemingly, missing, or even escaped. Through a barrage of well-known entities, we see the Universe unfurl through large and very colourf This anthology of stories started taking place years after the first "Sandman" series came to an end. After that, Leslie S. Klinger annotated them, which allowed a lot of Neil Gaiman's original ruminations to be explained and clarified. History now moves on. Aided by raven Matthew, we are guided through worlds where the Prince of Sleep is, seemingly, missing, or even escaped. Through a barrage of well-known entities, we see the Universe unfurl through large and very colourful representations of both Earth, The Dreaming, and other places. Gaiman's style is the same as before, as is his imagination. The only thing that is remarkably lacking from this anthology is plot, which is lacklustre. I've always thought Gaiman to be an extraordinary storyteller, but where he goes on a downward trajectory he falls quickly; this is, sadly, the case here. The stories don't hold up to their usual standard and the epics feel repetitive in comparison with what previously has been. This is still an OK collection of fantastical stories.

  15. 5 out of 5

    J.D. DeHart

    High fantasy, beautiful art, and mythology weave together to create a tremendous reading experience in this book. The characters are the stuff of dreams -- Neil Gaiman's dreams, in fact. And those are very interesting and revelatory dreams to explore. Si Spurrier leads this journey into the Sandman universe and I was glad to have the opportunity to see what this text had to offer. I would gladly visit for another volume.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    This is an incredibly dark and oddly-enough really smart piece of writing. Exactly my cup of tea. Awesome story telling, great pace and the aesthetics come correct. Super excited to continue this storyline.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cook

    This is the first Lucifer comic I'd ever read. I was familiar with the character from Neil Gaiman's Sandman series, but I'd never actually read any of the character's solo stories. So, as this volume began, I did feel a bit confused as to what was going on. Watters definitely throws readers into the deep end in this story, but it quickly becomes clear that he has a well-thought-out masterplan that proves to be very accessible for new readers - and very rewarding, I suspect, for longtime readers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Will Fenton

    Fascinating, but also helps if you've read the previous run, as this is a contuation of Mike Carey's work. As I haven't, I kinda had to just go with it. Still, pretty damn interesting and some really arresting art.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dan Allosso

    It was fine, and nice to see some of my favorite Sandman Universe characters again. Waiting for something of more cosmic scope to happen, though...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dsbook

    We are fans of Lucifer TV Series so I had to read the book that started it all. I Enjoy finding out more about Lucifer and his past. This is a very well written story and I loved the artwork. Will be watching for next book in this series. I will be recommending this book to my customers

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Lucifer is missing - that's never a good sign. So who is that red-headed man digging holes and searching for his missing memories? And what does this have to do with a coven of witches, a detective's dead wife, and the demon Mazikeen? When the dust settles, the answers you find might not be to these questions at all. And yet... This isn't the Lucifer you're used to, let's get that out of the way right from the start. This isn't Mike Carey's (excellent) Lucifer, it's not the Lucifer fr Lucifer is missing - that's never a good sign. So who is that red-headed man digging holes and searching for his missing memories? And what does this have to do with a coven of witches, a detective's dead wife, and the demon Mazikeen? When the dust settles, the answers you find might not be to these questions at all. And yet... This isn't the Lucifer you're used to, let's get that out of the way right from the start. This isn't Mike Carey's (excellent) Lucifer, it's not the Lucifer from the (also excellent) TV show, and it's definitely not Neil Gaiman's proto-Lucifer that gave us Mike Carey's Lucifer. This is a new beast, and when you take that into account, this becomes a much more interesting read. I think most of the battle I had with the first few issues of this title was trying to reconcile it with previous incarnations of the character, and that's not what new writer Dan Watters is trying to do. He's telling a Lucifer story, but he's not out to copy or straight up re-tell anything we've already heard. This is a new story, so get on board or get out of the way. This feels very Sandman in tone; there are a lot of smaller storylines outside of Lucifer's own, and they each build and build until they combine into one right at the end, with some breadcrumbs leading where you expect and some others springing out into new and unexpected directions - exactly how you'd expect to deal with Satan, I think. It's a tale of revenge and redemption, and of someone getting their dues - be it Lucifer, or one of the other characters is up to your interpretation. Max and Sebastian Fiumara bring a moody, dark atmosphere to the world of Lucifer that sets it apart from the previous Vertigo incarnations of the book. Again, it's a new aesthetic to suit the new character and direction, and I've always liked the Fiumaras. Lucifer's not going to be for everyone. Of all the Sandman Universe titles, I think it's the one that will divide most people. But if you're willing to give it a chance, you might find yourself trapped by the Lord of Lies once again, but for different reasons than you have been before.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Wow! This was a hell of a read (pun intended)! The stories are great, the artwork is superb! Just wow!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Woods

    Lucifer Vol. 1 is a dark and twisted story in true Gaiman fashion. Full of legends and myths, the story finds the prince of darkness trapped and broken fighting his way back to himself. The tale begins all contorted and twisted and confusing as all get out before settling down to an entertaining story of darkness and tricks that leaves you with an aha moment as everything clicks into place. The art tends toward the macabre and fits the story perfectly. Volume 1 is an exactly start to a new story Lucifer Vol. 1 is a dark and twisted story in true Gaiman fashion. Full of legends and myths, the story finds the prince of darkness trapped and broken fighting his way back to himself. The tale begins all contorted and twisted and confusing as all get out before settling down to an entertaining story of darkness and tricks that leaves you with an aha moment as everything clicks into place. The art tends toward the macabre and fits the story perfectly. Volume 1 is an exactly start to a new storyline. My voluntary, unbiased review is based upon a review copy from Netgalley.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    Admittedly, it's been more years than I care to remember since I last looked looked at the Sandman series. Happily, this was a genuine, unexpectedly excellent reintroduction the Sandman Universe. The story threads come together very well by the conclusion, the characters are memorable, and the art is lovely to look at. Think fans of graphic horror novels will be pleased. With thanks to DC and Netgalley for the arc.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    I feel like this came out in the 90s, which is not necessarily a bad thing. I enjoyed the throwback. I worry though that it is a bit wordy for this era of comics. However, Lucifer is always a fascinating character no matter who depicts him. The take on free will in this one is particularly good in my opinion too.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joe Jones

    I enjoyed the Sandman series and loved the Lucifer spin off comic from Mike Carey. This left me worried about how this comic would be. I think it started a little rough, but I have been pleasantly surprised at the overall quality. I am reading this in individual issues and do have it on my pull list. I like the direction it is going and will keep reading to see where it goes next!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    For those who thought the return of The Sandman was a bad idea, comes conclusive proof. This unreadable tosh makes The Dreaming book seem a breeze. Not even the handle of a new detective character, fresh from seeing his wife die, offers a firm enough grip for the creators to pull out a narrative. Dreary, depressing, and just plain boring. Do not bother.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    This book is amazing and the drawings are breathtaking. I loved it and I want to buy the hardcover to see the drawings at their best. Highly recommended! Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lexi

    I am not entirely sure, but I think this is the second in the new Sandman series. I liked this one a lot more than the one focused on Dream. The plot made sense, the art was enjoyable, and I look forward to seeing what happens next.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Absolutely love the Sandman universe, this was interesting and the art was good sure it will look better in hardcover then on my ereader. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher, I am voluntarily providing my honest review.

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