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Is Heathcliff a Murderer?: Great Puzzles in Nineteenth-Century Fiction

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In this quirky and intriguing book, John Sutherland has conveniently gathered together thirty-four nagging little questions, puzzles, errors, and enigmas from some of the best-loved examples of Victorian fiction. Readers often have stumbled upon seeming mysteries in their favorite novels. Why, for example, is the plot of The Woman in White irrevocably flawed? (The timing o In this quirky and intriguing book, John Sutherland has conveniently gathered together thirty-four nagging little questions, puzzles, errors, and enigmas from some of the best-loved examples of Victorian fiction. Readers often have stumbled upon seeming mysteries in their favorite novels. Why, for example, is the plot of The Woman in White irrevocably flawed? (The timing of the crime is off.) Is the hero of George Eliot's Middlemarch illegitimate? (Probably, although he was later legitimized.) Why does the otherwise sensible Jane Eyre give in to a sudden and unexplained outburst of superstition? (Charlotte Bronte, in reality, had a similar experience.) What is the real reason we find The Picture of Dorian Gray so disturbing? (There is an overwhelming emphasis on the sense of smell.) These answers and more can all be found in John Sutherland's entertaining and maddening book. When it comes to literary criticism there's really nothing quite like the joys of close reading and good-natured inquiry. This is the spirit in which Is Heathcliff A Murderer was conceived and executed. Rather than trying to catch great authors in mistakes, Sutherland usually turns up perfectly plausible reasons for the seeming anomalies. Everyone who reads nineteenth-century novels will thoroughly enjoy John Sutherland's exploration of the seemingly unanswered, and each chapter is a direct link to one of Oxford's World's Classics.


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In this quirky and intriguing book, John Sutherland has conveniently gathered together thirty-four nagging little questions, puzzles, errors, and enigmas from some of the best-loved examples of Victorian fiction. Readers often have stumbled upon seeming mysteries in their favorite novels. Why, for example, is the plot of The Woman in White irrevocably flawed? (The timing o In this quirky and intriguing book, John Sutherland has conveniently gathered together thirty-four nagging little questions, puzzles, errors, and enigmas from some of the best-loved examples of Victorian fiction. Readers often have stumbled upon seeming mysteries in their favorite novels. Why, for example, is the plot of The Woman in White irrevocably flawed? (The timing of the crime is off.) Is the hero of George Eliot's Middlemarch illegitimate? (Probably, although he was later legitimized.) Why does the otherwise sensible Jane Eyre give in to a sudden and unexplained outburst of superstition? (Charlotte Bronte, in reality, had a similar experience.) What is the real reason we find The Picture of Dorian Gray so disturbing? (There is an overwhelming emphasis on the sense of smell.) These answers and more can all be found in John Sutherland's entertaining and maddening book. When it comes to literary criticism there's really nothing quite like the joys of close reading and good-natured inquiry. This is the spirit in which Is Heathcliff A Murderer was conceived and executed. Rather than trying to catch great authors in mistakes, Sutherland usually turns up perfectly plausible reasons for the seeming anomalies. Everyone who reads nineteenth-century novels will thoroughly enjoy John Sutherland's exploration of the seemingly unanswered, and each chapter is a direct link to one of Oxford's World's Classics.

30 review for Is Heathcliff a Murderer?: Great Puzzles in Nineteenth-Century Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Is Heathcliff a Murderer? Puzzles in Nineteenth-century Fiction, is a book of literary conundrums, ideal for brainboxes to get their teeth into. The author, John Sutherland, is a British academic, a Professor of English literature with a distinguished record, and a yen for the Victorian age. The conundrums here all have their source in classic novels from around that time, hence it is far more stimulating and satisfying topic for a reader who is conversant with the novels themselves. However, he Is Heathcliff a Murderer? Puzzles in Nineteenth-century Fiction, is a book of literary conundrums, ideal for brainboxes to get their teeth into. The author, John Sutherland, is a British academic, a Professor of English literature with a distinguished record, and a yen for the Victorian age. The conundrums here all have their source in classic novels from around that time, hence it is far more stimulating and satisfying topic for a reader who is conversant with the novels themselves. However, he writes so entertainingly that each piece could act as a trigger to read an unknown work. The premise here is that a novel should be authentic and believable; both internally consistent and also true to the times. Thirty-two novels are chosen and for each one, there is a separate essay. John Sutherland carefully analyses the text, highlighting apparent inconsistencies, anachronisms and oversights. He explains historical references to the Victorian age, which a modern reader may not know, and also points out the context within the author's body of work. Sometimes it becomes clear though, that the author probably just forgot a minor detail. The book isn't only about "catching the author out" however. In one chapter about "Martin Chuzzlewit" entitled "Mysteries of the Dickensian Year", Sutherland focuses entirely on the calendar of events in the book. He cites many specific instances throughout the book, and basically you can't get away from the fact that the timings of the different story threads just don't coincide. Even though Dickens carefully refers to seasons rather than specific dates, the timings are impossible. In one particular case, a whole year seems to be missing. So are these mistakes on the part of the author? Sutherland cites examples by other authors from the time, such as George Eliot, Anthony Trollope and William Thackeray, where the reader can track events using a calendar and find that the events in the novel match it precisely. Could Dickens just not be bothered to get his dates right? John Sutherland points out that mood is key in all of Dickens' novels. It is important for Dickens that some events happen with dark, depressing weather to accompany them, or a terrific storm to accompany violent actions and murder. It adds to their emotional resonance. Other events, light-hearted, optimistic or humorous events, are enhanced by the depiction of Spring or Summer. Dickens's focus does not lie in verisimilitude of a nit-picking type; he sacrifices that for mood. This is just one instance. In each of the 32 chapters, or essays, John Sutherland quotes extracts of other authors' novels, explaining how they can sometimes be seen as evidence that something else is going on below the surface of the book; something which is not explicitly described. It's a fascinating read for those who have a certain type of mind. For others, it might prove frustrating, seem to miss the point, or be merely irrelevant. If like me you enjoy these "brainteasers", you will be pleased to hear that the author went on to write two more in the series. They are nice to dip into just after you have read a particular novel, although some puzzle fanatics with good memories might enjoy reading the book straight through. Here is an alphabetical list of authors, each of whom have one or more essays devoted to one or more of their novels in this particular volume: Jane Austen Anne Bronte Charlotte Bronte Emily Bronte Wilkie Collins Arthur Conan Doyle Charles Dickens George Eliot Elizabeth Gaskell Thomas Hardy Henry James Rudyard Kipling Walter Scott Mary Shelley R.L. Stevenson Bram Stoker W.M. Thackeray Anthony Trollope H.G. Wells Oscar Wilde

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Sutherland ponders some of the questions that great literature raises. And yes, he does address the title questions, and I find it hard to disagree with him. Really, why is Heathcliff so bloody attractive? He strangles a dog to death! That's the type of man you want to marry? Yeah, yeah, I know; the whole bad boy thing. Right. It shouldn't extend that far. How well you like this book depends upon your relationship to the novels Sutherland examines. Sutherland is intelligent enough to point out tha Sutherland ponders some of the questions that great literature raises. And yes, he does address the title questions, and I find it hard to disagree with him. Really, why is Heathcliff so bloody attractive? He strangles a dog to death! That's the type of man you want to marry? Yeah, yeah, I know; the whole bad boy thing. Right. It shouldn't extend that far. How well you like this book depends upon your relationship to the novels Sutherland examines. Sutherland is intelligent enough to point out that his answers are not "THE ANSWERS" and encourages readers to think of thier own answers to the questions. What Sutherland also does is a give a run down about the current and older theories surronding some of the questions. He does this particularly well in the chapter about Tess of the D'Urbervilles which discusses whether or not Alec is a rapist. I also truly enjoyed the chapter about The Picture of Dorian Graywhere Sutherland explains why people view the story as distrubing. Never really understand that myself. Sure, it's spooky, but it's not really different than other fantasy novels or even other works of the time. Sutherland examines works by Anthony Trollope, Charles Dickens, and George Eliot. He also wades into the discussion about the ending of Villette. Sutherland also raises very good points about film versions of Frankenstein and Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde. The one drawback is that I really wish that Sutherland had written this book after the BBC's Jekyll series, for I think they got it right there. If you like 19th century literature, this is an excellent companion book, and you do not need to have or even want a degree in English to read it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    Chapters 1. Where Does Sir Thomas's Wealth Come From? Mansfield Park 2. How Much English Blood (if any) Does Waverley Spill?Waverley 3. Apple Blossom In June? Emma 4. Effie Deans's Phantom Pregnancy? The Heart of Midlothian 5. How Does Victor Make His Monster? Frankenstein 6. Is Oliver Dreaming? Oliver Twist 7. Mysteries of The Dickensian Year? Martin Chuzzlewit 8. Is Heathcliff a Murderer? Wuthering Heights 9. Rochester's Celestial Telegram Jane Eyre 10.Does Becky Kill Jos? Vanity Fair 11.Who Is Helen Chapters 1. Where Does Sir Thomas's Wealth Come From? Mansfield Park 2. How Much English Blood (if any) Does Waverley Spill?Waverley 3. Apple Blossom In June? Emma 4. Effie Deans's Phantom Pregnancy? The Heart of Midlothian 5. How Does Victor Make His Monster? Frankenstein 6. Is Oliver Dreaming? Oliver Twist 7. Mysteries of The Dickensian Year? Martin Chuzzlewit 8. Is Heathcliff a Murderer? Wuthering Heights 9. Rochester's Celestial Telegram Jane Eyre 10.Does Becky Kill Jos? Vanity Fair 11.Who Is Helen Graham The Tenant of Wildfell Hall 12.What Kind Of Murderer is John Barton? Mary Barton 13.On a Gross Anachronism? Henry Esmond 14.What is Jo Sweeping? Bleak Houe 15.Villette's Double Ending? Villette 16.What is Hetty Waiting for? Adam Bede 17.The Missing Fortnight? The Woman in White 18.Two-timing novelists? Pendennis, A Dark Nights Work, Rachel Ray 19.The Phantom Pregnancy of Mary Flood Jones? Phineas Finn 20.Is Will Ladislaw Legitimate? Middlemarch 21.Is Malmotte Jewish? The Way We Live Now 22.Where is Tenway Junction? The Prime Minister 23.Was He Popenjoy? Is He Popenjoy? 24.R H Hutton's Spoiling Hands? Portrait of a Lady 25.What Does Edward Hyde Look Like? Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde 26.Who is Alexander's Father? The Master of Ballantrae 27.Why Does This Novel Disturb Us? The Picture of Dorian Gray 28.Is Alec a Rapist? Tess of the d'Urbervilles 29.Mystery of the Speckled Band? Sherlock Holmes 30.What Does Arabella Donn Throw? Jude the Obscure 31.What is Duncan Jopp's Crime? Weir of Hermiston 32.WhyDoes the Count Come to Englad? Dracula 33. How Old is Kim Kim

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cat.

    This is a series of books based on the subtitle of this first one: "Great Puzzles in Nineteenth-Century Literature." It was recommended in the bibliography of the most recent Thursday Next book; now I know where Fforde gets (some of) his ideas! Topping it all over, the cover of the copy I read has a lovely picture of Olivier as Heathcliff on it. Confession: I didn't read this cover to cover. I read the Intro and the chapters on the books that I've actually read. In other words, having never read This is a series of books based on the subtitle of this first one: "Great Puzzles in Nineteenth-Century Literature." It was recommended in the bibliography of the most recent Thursday Next book; now I know where Fforde gets (some of) his ideas! Topping it all over, the cover of the copy I read has a lovely picture of Olivier as Heathcliff on it. Confession: I didn't read this cover to cover. I read the Intro and the chapters on the books that I've actually read. In other words, having never read The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte, I skipped the chapter called "Who is Helen Graham?" because I don't have even a faint clue who she is! But the chapters on Jane Eyre and Oliver Twist et al. were very interesting. I'll do the highlights in the order I read them: - "How does Victor make his monsters?" Mary Shelley, Frankenstein--There are some fascinating sexual overtones here that have been completely missed by filmmakers more interested in making this a story about science than about humanity. - "Is Oliver dreaming? Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist--This is about when he is rescued and taken to the country but "dreams" he sees Fagin at the window. I don't actually remember this part of the book myself. - "Is Heathcliff a murderer?" Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights--The question is whether Heathcliff actively smothered Hindley, or just didn't assist him to keep him from dying. Some would say there's no real difference; he's culpable and that's all that matters. - "Rochester's celestial telegram" Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre--In her later writings, Bronte insisted that she didn't believe in romantic miracles to further the plot. Yet, miles away from Rochester, Jane clearly hears him calling her at the very moment he later admits to saying her name. What was Bronte talking about?? - "R.H. Hutton's spoiling hand" Henry James, The Portrait of a Lady (and Eliot's Middlemarch)--In which we find out that the first editions of both of these books end differently from subsequent editions most likely because Hutton, a well-known literary critic, denounced them for the "moral collapse" of the main characters. The authors went back and rewrote the ending to "clarify" that they really didn't mean the reward immorality. sigh - "What does Edward Hyde look like?" R.L. Stevenson, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde--Interestingly, Stevenson never provides a detailed description of the evil Mr Hyde, even though he does a masterful job of telling us what Dr. Jekyll looks like. Why? - "Is Alec a rapist?" Thomas Hardy, Tess of the D'Urbervilles--Well, depends on your definition of rape, now, doesn't it? - "Mysteries of the Speckled Band" Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes--There are several: why did two women raised in India not recognize deadly Indian snakes? Were the Misses Stoner some kind of sex-slaves of their step-father? Why did Miss Stoner die so young, subsequent to the solving of the mystery itself?So obviously, if you didn't "do" 19th-century Brit-lit, you won't get much out of this book. Not to worry! Sutherland has done several other books. Can't wait to read them. I'm hoping he eventually hits some more American authors. ahem.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth K.

    Each chapter of this book is devoted to a specific work of 19th century English literature, addressing some burning question that is not answered with complete clarity in the text. In the title essay, for example, the author looks closely at the death of one of the characters in Wuthering Heights -- did Heathcliff have a direct role, or was he merely an observer? Sadly, this was one of those reads where I was foiled by my own misguided expectations. I'm not exactly sure how this happened, but the Each chapter of this book is devoted to a specific work of 19th century English literature, addressing some burning question that is not answered with complete clarity in the text. In the title essay, for example, the author looks closely at the death of one of the characters in Wuthering Heights -- did Heathcliff have a direct role, or was he merely an observer? Sadly, this was one of those reads where I was foiled by my own misguided expectations. I'm not exactly sure how this happened, but the impression I formed when the book was recommended to me was that it would be a snarky book -- I was expected a lot of laughing behind one's hand and sarcastic commentary. As things turned out, this book was nothing like that at all, it is very methodical and literary, surveying the various explanations put forward by critics, and if anything, a little dry. It was good, but I'm still sort of mourning the book I didn't read that doesn't exist. In my head, that one was really good. Grade: B Recommended: To people who are very familiar with 19th English lit, presuming it didn't breed contempt. The essays definitely include reveals of key plot points. 2008/7

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Interesting to fans of 19th century literature, especially those who like the Victorians. Some of the "puzzles" the author looks to solve aren't really that puzzling but this book kept me reading, in part because the essays were so short that I hardly had time to get bored. Some of the answers he comes up with are more concrete than others so those looking for yes or no, true or false, will likely be disappointed. In fact, I'm a little surprised at which essay was chosen as the title of the book Interesting to fans of 19th century literature, especially those who like the Victorians. Some of the "puzzles" the author looks to solve aren't really that puzzling but this book kept me reading, in part because the essays were so short that I hardly had time to get bored. Some of the answers he comes up with are more concrete than others so those looking for yes or no, true or false, will likely be disappointed. In fact, I'm a little surprised at which essay was chosen as the title of the book since the answer to the question posed is "Um...maybe." Hardly his strongest answer to a puzzle.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kirsti

    I read this book a couple of years ago, but I picked it up again to reread the part about The Woman in White, a novel that I finished reading last week. I love the idea that, had I lived in the early 1860s, I could have bought merchandising tie-ins to The Woman in White--including perfume, cloaks, bonnets, and sheet music for waltzes and quadrilles. :-)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Judith Rich

    LOVE these books. Re-read them regularly. Why do people think Heathcliff is the ultimate romantic hero? He beats his wife and kills puppies for fun. Murderer or not, I wouldn't touch him with a ten foot barge pole.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Hobbs

    Essays I particularly enjoyed: Where does Sir Thomas's wealth come from? Does Becky kill Jos? Who is Helen Graham? What kind of a murderer is John Barton? What is Hetty waiting for? Is Will Ladislaw legitimate? Is Alec a rapist?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Margie

    Not for reading straight through. Poses some interesting questions, though I found funny the number of times he noted that we really can't know what the author intended. I think I need to take a break from John Sutherland for a bit. These puzzles get rather repetitive after a bit.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Interesting, but kind of dry.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Well researched and really interesting. I don't always agree with him, but it makes me think!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Juliej

    A great little book, short chapters, easy to read and an interesting perspective on some of the puzzles in classic works. The title is a bit misleading, there are actually over 30 chapters each dealing with a puzzle or discrepancy in a novel. If you've read the actual novel referred to then that chapter will be a whole lot more meaningful. It's a book for thoughtful (should that be pedantic?)booklovers. eg it discusses why Charlotte Bronte put in the "Jane, Jane" call in near the end of Jane Eyre, A great little book, short chapters, easy to read and an interesting perspective on some of the puzzles in classic works. The title is a bit misleading, there are actually over 30 chapters each dealing with a puzzle or discrepancy in a novel. If you've read the actual novel referred to then that chapter will be a whole lot more meaningful. It's a book for thoughtful (should that be pedantic?)booklovers. eg it discusses why Charlotte Bronte put in the "Jane, Jane" call in near the end of Jane Eyre, and examines the complicated family relationships in Middlemarch. My favourite was the discussion of Tess of the d'Urbervilles - was she seduced or raped? - I remember my English teacher at school 'correcting' me on this but I have always thought I was right, and thank you Mr Sutherland I feel justified after all these years!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Val

    John Sutherland's speciality is C19th literature; he has made a close study of the texts and found a few anomalies within them. They may be problems with continuity, most were written as serials, they may be plot holes, intentional or not, or they may be something self-evident at the time and anomalous now. It is a good idea to have read the books he is writing about beforehand, but, if reading for pleasure, his close attention to detail can seem unnecessarily pedantic. As something of a pedant m John Sutherland's speciality is C19th literature; he has made a close study of the texts and found a few anomalies within them. They may be problems with continuity, most were written as serials, they may be plot holes, intentional or not, or they may be something self-evident at the time and anomalous now. It is a good idea to have read the books he is writing about beforehand, but, if reading for pleasure, his close attention to detail can seem unnecessarily pedantic. As something of a pedant myself, I find he is also insightful, illuminating and worthy of my deepest admiration. His writing is not pedantic in style and he is often amusing. I do not think his books (there are two other similar ones) would make anyone want to read the classic novels under his expert, forensic scrutiny.

  15. 4 out of 5

    James

    This is the book that answers questions about some of the mysteries of Victorian fiction. It is a sort of reference work that reminds me of the books I have read yet some of the entries are about books which I have not read. My favorites including Dickens, Hardy and Stevenson are discussed; but there are others including Austen, Trollope, Scott and Stoker. Reading this book almost makes you want to return to each novel and reread them to discover the enigmas for yourself. John Sutherland's excep This is the book that answers questions about some of the mysteries of Victorian fiction. It is a sort of reference work that reminds me of the books I have read yet some of the entries are about books which I have not read. My favorites including Dickens, Hardy and Stevenson are discussed; but there are others including Austen, Trollope, Scott and Stoker. Reading this book almost makes you want to return to each novel and reread them to discover the enigmas for yourself. John Sutherland's exceptional ability at literary detections makes this is one of those books about books that is fun to read a bit at a time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Arthur

    This is a very entertaining collection of essays on apparent inconsistencies and unanswered questions in British novels of the 19th Century. In proposing his own solutions to these "puzzles", Sutherland spans a range from minutiae involving a very close reading of the text to major issues in contemporary literary criticism. The pieces are well written, and even if it's been a while since you've read Middlemarch or The Picture of Dorian Gray, you won't find it hard to keep up with the discussion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    T. Finley

    I didn't think this book was quite on par with the author's second volume of literary puzzles, titled 'Can Jane Eyre Be Happy'. But that could just be because I read the second volume first, so the second volume acted as my first introduction to the author and his fascinating series of books. I would still encourage anyone with an interest in classic literature to read 'Is Heathcliff A Murderer'. You may never look at your favorite classic novel the same way again. Did I like it? Yes. Would I rere I didn't think this book was quite on par with the author's second volume of literary puzzles, titled 'Can Jane Eyre Be Happy'. But that could just be because I read the second volume first, so the second volume acted as my first introduction to the author and his fascinating series of books. I would still encourage anyone with an interest in classic literature to read 'Is Heathcliff A Murderer'. You may never look at your favorite classic novel the same way again. Did I like it? Yes. Would I reread it? Yes. Would I recommend it? Yes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol Littlejohn

    I love this series by author John Suthlerland who explores the themes and characters of classic literature. So, is Heathcliff a murderer? The author offers plausible reasons why Heathcliff may have committed murder. Other puzzles in literature concern the characters of books by Jane Austen and George Elliott, to name just a few. It's a book that you should own because, if you love literature, you will constantly reread this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    matthew

    these books made me very happy, though the titles are a bit misleading. truly, they should be called "how authors make continuity errors, it is to laugh (parts the first and second)"... and that's just what i did. as a bonus, they made me want to read books i hadn't read, and reread ones i'd forgotten or disliked, just to make fun of the mistakes. there is some interesting speculation, too, to be fair.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Some of the essays in this book are over things I consider trivial, but others are very interesting commentaries. I still haven't read the whole thing. I like to read it one essay at a time as I read the books they're about. Still, I've read enough of them to recommend it to anyone who like 19th century fiction.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    Going over some of the most famous novels ever written, Mr. Sutherland exposes the flaws in their writings. Showing the careful attention to detail of the dedicated bibliophile and the true pedant, he forces the reader to take a closer, more critical look at these well-loved novels and see that they still carry merit in spite of the gaping holes of logic.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anna Maria

    Quite enjoyable little book about some of the best-known Victorian classics, even if it doesn't reveal anything extraordinary. I'd recommend this to anyone with a personal interest in the stories or students looking for inspiration. It isn't likely to contain anything new for someone who's already begun studying the works, however.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I love John Sutherland. Reading his work is like listening to a courtroom drama where the defendants are characters from 19th century literature. His essays are full of fascinating trivia, including a lot of the dirty stuff that Victorian writers glossed over. Best of all, Sutherland never simply nitpicks a novel, he always tries to come up with a plausible defense for what the writer did.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Dambro

    Lovely excursion into 19th Century English Literature. Solving the puzzles in some of the most famous novels in an age of novels. I might have to dip into a long neglected part of my education. When I was younger I would not have touched Brit Lit with a ten foot Pole or a six foot Italian.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zandra

    I really enjoyed this little book giving quirky insights into the greatest works of nineteenth century fiction. John Sutherland's writing is erudite and accessible, and he is skilful at reading between the lines to answer those questions that have left us wondering.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Priya

    Thoroughly enjoyable and the essays are short so can be read 2-3 at a time. It helps if you've read the books about which Sutherland's writing (and most of us have, I'd reckon) and some of his essays seem deliberately provocative but, overall, a fun and relaxing read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    Questions about literature.....Why was only one footprint found in Robinson Crusoe?....Why didn't Dr. Frankenstein use a whole body and not just one whole one?......

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alannah Clarke

    Very interesting, although it did not help me that much with my Wuthering Heights essay.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bunnyhugger

    This is a fun collection of essays. I'd think you'd have to be familiar with the novels in question to enjoy them though.

  30. 4 out of 5

    John

    Author does a good job of addressing points raised (though not specifically resolved) by 19th century British authors in their various works.

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