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Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond

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An engaging and deeply reported investigation of friendship: its evolution, purpose, and centrality in human and nonhuman lives alike. The bonds of friendship are universal and elemental. In Friendship, journalist Lydia Denworth visits the front lines of the science of friendship in search of its biological, psychological, and evolutionary foundations. Finding it to be as An engaging and deeply reported investigation of friendship: its evolution, purpose, and centrality in human and nonhuman lives alike. The bonds of friendship are universal and elemental. In Friendship, journalist Lydia Denworth visits the front lines of the science of friendship in search of its biological, psychological, and evolutionary foundations. Finding it to be as old as life on the African savannas, she also discovers that friendship is reflected in our brain waves, detectable in our genomes, and capable of strengthening our cardiovascular and immune systems. Its opposite, loneliness, can kill. As a result, social connection is finally being recognized as critical to our physical and emotional well-being. With warmth and compassion, Denworth weaves together past and present, field biology and cutting-edge neuroscience, to show how our bodies and minds are designed to make friends, the process by which social bonds develop, and how a drive for friendship underpins human (and nonhuman) society. With its refreshingly optimistic vision of the evolution of human nature, this book puts friendship at the center of our lives.


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An engaging and deeply reported investigation of friendship: its evolution, purpose, and centrality in human and nonhuman lives alike. The bonds of friendship are universal and elemental. In Friendship, journalist Lydia Denworth visits the front lines of the science of friendship in search of its biological, psychological, and evolutionary foundations. Finding it to be as An engaging and deeply reported investigation of friendship: its evolution, purpose, and centrality in human and nonhuman lives alike. The bonds of friendship are universal and elemental. In Friendship, journalist Lydia Denworth visits the front lines of the science of friendship in search of its biological, psychological, and evolutionary foundations. Finding it to be as old as life on the African savannas, she also discovers that friendship is reflected in our brain waves, detectable in our genomes, and capable of strengthening our cardiovascular and immune systems. Its opposite, loneliness, can kill. As a result, social connection is finally being recognized as critical to our physical and emotional well-being. With warmth and compassion, Denworth weaves together past and present, field biology and cutting-edge neuroscience, to show how our bodies and minds are designed to make friends, the process by which social bonds develop, and how a drive for friendship underpins human (and nonhuman) society. With its refreshingly optimistic vision of the evolution of human nature, this book puts friendship at the center of our lives.

30 review for Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lydia Denworth

    I not only read this, I wrote it! So I am understandably biased. But upon re-reading it in preparation for publication, I've realized something important. People ask about books you read that change your life. I can say that reporting this book changed my life. It gave me permission to hang out with my friends more. I hope it will do the same for everyone else who reads it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Camelia Rose

    This book is part psychology and part animal study (primatology). It centers around friendship, well-written and easy to read. I like it quite a lot. What I've found in the book: 1. There is an evolution basis for friendship. Friendship (social bond between non-kins) does not only exist in human society. The author described several animal studies, especially primates. A study of the structure of social relationships among female baboons in Moremi, Botswana shows: 1) the strength of females social This book is part psychology and part animal study (primatology). It centers around friendship, well-written and easy to read. I like it quite a lot. What I've found in the book: 1. There is an evolution basis for friendship. Friendship (social bond between non-kins) does not only exist in human society. The author described several animal studies, especially primates. A study of the structure of social relationships among female baboons in Moremi, Botswana shows: 1) the strength of females’ social bonds was the most important factor in their reproductive success. 2) females that had strong stable social bonds lived longer themselves. 2. Friendship can mean different things to different people. Number of friends may not matter much for some, but the quality does matter for all. Ambivalent relationship is not ambivalent--it is just bad. One research says: "Men are more likely to build relationships that focus on what friends can do for them, what opportunities they can open, what kind of resources they can provide—all of which Hall describes as agency. Women, on the other hand, are more likely to expect their closest friends to offer emotional nourishment and support." Does it still stand, especially in younger generation? It sounds too stereotypical to me. 3. Chapter Four is the friendship in child development. A lot of common sense is validated by science: 1) Puberty a turning point for dealing with stress, and it comes with the bad news for parents: "Up to the age of ten, mothers calmed down the amygdala by engaging prefrontal circuitry in children’s brains that works to control stress. In adolescents, who were eleven to seventeen in this study, Mom’s presence no longer worked the same magic. The brain’s response to stress remained highly reactive. On the plus side for teenagers, the necessary brain circuitry for managing the stress—a network that connects the amygdala to the prefrontal cortex—is more fully developed, so they are on their way to mature responses." 2) It is not peer-pressure, but "peer effect." “The presence of peers is so powerful during adolescence that it can make even mice misbehave,” Steinberg wrote in his 2014 book Age of Opportunity, "Pressure doesn’t have to come into it, merely presence...We came to the notion that basically when kids are around other kids it primes their reward system to be more easily aroused and more easily activated. That in turn leads them to pay undue attention to the potential rewards of a risky choice and relatively less to the potential costs.” As my mother has told me (and her mother has told her), parents should worry about whom their kids are hanging around, because your kids' health requires them to have friends therefore peer pressure or peer influence is inevitable. 4. Online friendship Apparently various studies of social media's influence on people's mental health have produced mixed results. One researcher says: “Using social media is essentially a tradeoff,” Hancock says. “You get very small but significant advantages for your well-being that come with very small but statistically significant costs.” What’s more, the overall effect on well-being, meaning the amount of variation among individuals that could be attributed to technology use when all effects were combined, was “essentially zero,” Hancock says. To be specific, it was 0.01 on a scale in which 0.2 is considered a small effect size. A more nuanced questioning is needed: "The overwhelming attention to time on social media (both frequency and duration of use) ignores content or context. The very concept of screen time is essentially meaningless given the variety of possible ways to occupy that time. Who and what we interact with matter as much or more than for how long." However, the author does not mention the highly addictive nature of these social media tools, which is a feature not a bug. In my view, this feature can only lead to worse, not better, outcome in the users' mental health and relationships. 5. The role of friendship in physical and mental health and the deficit of such can cause serious physical and mental damage. “Human beings,” they would go on to write, “have a pervasive drive to form and maintain at least a minimum quantity of lasting, positive, and significant relationships.” The consensus, Silk wrote, was that human friendships were “intimate, supportive, egalitarian relationships.” They required compatibility and an investment of time. When asked, “What have you learned?”, George Vaillant, the longtime director of the Study of Adult Development at the Harvard University Health Service, replied: “That the only thing that really matters in life are your relationships to other people.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    MBJ

    I got an early copy of the book and I already feel like it has had an impact on me. It is a great kick off book for 2020. Instead of skipping wine in January for my health, I'm having more wine and seeing friends which is far more important and fun. It is a great read filled with both great science and personal anecdotes on the importance of investing in our most basic relationships. It makes a compelling argument for doubling down on good friends. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amber Spencer

    I loved a lot about this. I had a lot of friends as a teenager, but I often felt bad for wanting to be with them. I have tried not to pass that on to my kids and realize how important friends are to teenagers and this book is filled with the science to back up my feelings. As an adult I have found some really amazing friends and the ones that want to give back to the relationship with me are the ones I still hang out with and see. Friendship goes two ways. Making time for friends and making time I loved a lot about this. I had a lot of friends as a teenager, but I often felt bad for wanting to be with them. I have tried not to pass that on to my kids and realize how important friends are to teenagers and this book is filled with the science to back up my feelings. As an adult I have found some really amazing friends and the ones that want to give back to the relationship with me are the ones I still hang out with and see. Friendship goes two ways. Making time for friends and making time for our kids to have friends is important to happiness and bonding with other humans. If you think you don’t need friends, science says otherwise. Go hang out with your friends and make it a regular thing! (Sometimes the science behind all the claims was boring to me. But maybe that was because I didn’t need much convincing.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leah MacFarlane

    I absolutely loved this fascinating book on the science of friendship. The author presents an amazing amount of information in the most readable, compelling way. It is remarkable to find out how friendship has influenced and been influenced by human evolution, and the actual biological power of the friendship bond. Denworth creates wonderful images of her global travels to meet and see in person the network of scientists who are working on this ground-breaking area. They are all so memorably I absolutely loved this fascinating book on the science of friendship. The author presents an amazing amount of information in the most readable, compelling way. It is remarkable to find out how friendship has influenced and been influenced by human evolution, and the actual biological power of the friendship bond. Denworth creates wonderful images of her global travels to meet and see in person the network of scientists who are working on this ground-breaking area. They are all so memorably drawn that what could be an overwhelming amount of information is easily absorbed and remembered. Finding out that friendships have an important role to play in the biological advantages affecting evolution was totally intriguing. I highly recommend. A perfect gift for friends on Valentine's Day!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anna Walker-Roberts

    Im making a film about friendship, specifically about platonic best friends, and read this book as part of my research. I loved understanding more of the science and biology behind friendship. What really hooked me initially was Lydias dismissal of the friendship chapter in C.S. Lewis book The Four Loves. I read that book and wanted to rip out the whole chapter on friendship. I immediately felt like Lydia and I would be friends :) She does a great job of sharing the science and data while I’m making a film about friendship, specifically about platonic best friends, and read this book as part of my research. I loved understanding more of the science and biology behind friendship. What really hooked me initially was Lydia’s dismissal of the friendship chapter in C.S. Lewis’ book The Four Loves. I read that book and wanted to rip out the whole chapter on friendship. I immediately felt like Lydia and I would be friends :) She does a great job of sharing the science and data while intermingling personal anecdotes that bring to mind friends of your own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Moira Bailey

    Lydia Denworths Friendship translates cutting-edge science in telling a compelling story that details and underscores how close connections are not only necessary - they will extend, and potentially save, our lives. She reveals and revels in a topic that is universally important and endlessly interesting. Lydia Denworth’s Friendship translates cutting-edge science in telling a compelling story that details and underscores how close connections are not only necessary - they will extend, and potentially save, our lives. She reveals and revels in a topic that is universally important and endlessly interesting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charles Nguyen

    I love this book as it talks about the science of friendship. Mix in a bit of monkey science with attachment, friendship in school, the deepness of connections, heredity or genetic expression, and rounding it off with the impact on our lives... woo! Much of this science is current and up-to-date. It's been a while since I've read something that triggered about 20 more books into my "to-read" list. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to think about what makes friends tick. Friendship must be I love this book as it talks about the science of friendship. Mix in a bit of monkey science with attachment, friendship in school, the deepness of connections, heredity or genetic expression, and rounding it off with the impact on our lives... woo! Much of this science is current and up-to-date. It's been a while since I've read something that triggered about 20 more books into my "to-read" list. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to think about what makes friends tick. Friendship must be one of the topics of the year as there are a couple more that I see.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Lydia Denworth's comprehensive look at the evolution and necessity of friendship is highly informative and engaging. I don't think I've ever devoured a nonfiction book quite this quickly, and that was all due to Denworth's writing style--she ably breaks down even complicated scientific terms and ideas so anyone can understand them by illustrating unfamiliar concepts with stories and analogies from her own life. Learning more about what scientists are currently discovering about the importance of Lydia Denworth's comprehensive look at the evolution and necessity of friendship is highly informative and engaging. I don't think I've ever devoured a nonfiction book quite this quickly, and that was all due to Denworth's writing style--she ably breaks down even complicated scientific terms and ideas so anyone can understand them by illustrating unfamiliar concepts with stories and analogies from her own life. Learning more about what scientists are currently discovering about the importance of friendship would have been compelling enough (spoiler alert: friendship is highly important to our health and well-being at all points of our lives) but she also takes us through the all the primate studies that have been conducted through the past several decades. Interestingly, primate research teaches us that friendship is much older than humans are, suggesting that it is not just a nice thing to have; it's a biological imperative. Denworth wraps up with an exhortation for us to pay attention to and cultivate our relationships even if we feel we're too busy for friends because just like neglecting our health, the ramifications of neglecting our friends could lead to loneliness in later life, and that loneliness has been proven to be just as deadly as any of our current health crises. Everyone should read this book and then go hug their friends and family members.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steph Holmes

    I was fortunate to have read an early release of Lydia Denworths bookFriendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond. It is beautifully written and seamlessly weaves cutting edge science with the essential role of friendship. I was completely engaged by the clear explanations of the work of the scientists who have studied multiple speciesfrom rhesus monkeys to zebra fishto explain our interactions with certain people and what we expect and, more I was fortunate to have read an early release of Lydia Denworth’s book—Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond. It is beautifully written and seamlessly weaves cutting edge science with the essential role of friendship. I was completely engaged by the clear explanations of the work of the scientists who have studied multiple species—from rhesus monkeys to zebra fish—to explain our interactions with certain people and what we expect and, more importantly, what we receive from those with whom we bond. I am certainly not the only one who understands how important and timely this book is. It was just selected by the Next Big Idea Club (Malcolm Gladwell, Susan Cain, Adam Grant, and Daniel Pink) as one of the six must-read nonfiction Books of Winter 2020! For years now I have been inundated with the all the reasons why meditation improves my health. I am not knocking meditation, but as Ms. Denworth so eloquently illustrates, through clear and fascinating explanations of the neuroscience as well as personal observation, friendship is the foundation of a healthy life, well lived. After reading this book, I hugged all my friends (perhaps they were a bit bemused) and then I wanted to make new friends. My reasons were perhaps self-interested but like the monkeys and fish I knew it was essential to my well-being. I am a committed but poor meditator but, because of this book, I now know what it means to be a good friend and to have good friends. You would be well served to understand that too.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    2.5 Did we really need 250+ pages to tell us the importance of friendship?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ari Robin McKenna

    Though I appreciate the wide sampling of sources collated into a single volume, "Friendship" doesn't reach for revelatory depth. The strongest theme in the book is the author's personal anecdotes about her family, which while not unrelated or forced, end up becoming central to the book, the main take-away.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peter A

    A fascinating read about the underlying evolutionary and biological basis for friendship. The author is a gifted science writer who has conducted hours of research, talking with scientists, observing experiments, and understanding the concept presented in compiling this book. In 1975, in E.O. Wilsons Sociobiology: The New Synthesis, presented the idea that genes make us do what we do socially, namely it was not just culture that impacted our social behavior, was very controversial. However, A fascinating read about the underlying evolutionary and biological basis for friendship. The author is a gifted science writer who has conducted hours of research, talking with scientists, observing experiments, and understanding the concept presented in compiling this book. In 1975, in E.O. Wilson’s Sociobiology: The New Synthesis, presented the idea that genes make us do what we do socially, namely it was not just culture that impacted our social behavior, was very controversial. However, scientific proof is now on Wilson’s side. The book starts near this point, and raises the question of why is friendship so important to our lives? What are the evolutionary forces that give friendship an advantage? The book moves back and forth (in a progression of chapters) between the evolutionary forces, the comparative analysis with other species, the current understanding of the biology of our bodies and those of other primates, and the implication of friendship (and bonds between individuals) at various ages: infants, teenagers, and older adults. It also takes us right up to ongoing studies, often collaborations between neuroscientists and sociologist, in understanding the brain patterns of friends (for example why some people’s friendship clicks, and others do not, and even trying to predict friendship between people). Let me give some examples. In primates and in humans, the bonding of mother and child is critical to the development of brain patterns and the behavior of the child. Lack of those interactions has significant implications for the development of the child’s social skills. Knowing this it is unconscionable of separating children and babies from mothers. This will have a lasting negative impact. And with teenagers, the emotional part of the brain develops much faster than the reasonable part. What is really interesting is that those individuals with strong networks of friends (and support) tend to weather illnesses better (and there are biological proofs of this through existence of certain levels of specific chemicals); in loneliness, those chemicals are missing and thus lonely people tends to have higher levels of “inflammation”, which leads to greater affinity to disease. And there is a strong case the people should continue to be engaged in meaningful networks of people as they age, since it is “keeps them younger.” While much (not all) of these facts are known, what the author does is put them in a larger context of friendship (one definition is that friendships are intimate, supportive, egalitarian relations (p 133)), in the relatedness of behavior with other animals, and taking us right to the edge of experiments today. While there were a few sections that I did not have the same high opinion of, I thought the book one worth reading to understand the value of friendship at all ages of life, and WHY this is so important to our bodies and our lives. The book concludes with a statement about the oldest of our population, and cites work done at Harvard over a 75 year period (an amazing study). I provide a link to the TED talk of “What makes a good life”. Robert Waldinger: What makes a good life ... - TED Talks https://www.ted.com/talks/robert_wald... I hope you will pick up a copy of this book and read it. Quoting Robert Waldinger “The only thing that really matters in life are your relations to other people.” “Good relationships keep us happier and healthier” (mentally and physically). The book helps explain why!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    But for the persistence of a close friend, the client would have died. That was the take-away from a client meeting I had a year or so ago. Like many people, the client was older, single and lived alone. Contrary to the client's normal ways, a Saturday evening dinner was canceled because the client was under the weather. The next morning the client called in sick to teach Sunday School, and upon hearing this news the client's astute and caring friend new something was amiss and showed up at the But for the persistence of a close friend, the client would have died. That was the take-away from a client meeting I had a year or so ago. Like many people, the client was older, single and lived alone. Contrary to the client's normal ways, a Saturday evening dinner was canceled because the client was under the weather. The next morning the client called in sick to teach Sunday School, and upon hearing this news the client's astute and caring friend new something was amiss and showed up at the client's door. Visibly disoriented, the client's friend knew medical attention was needed. Refusing the astute friend to call 911, the client agreed to be driven to the ER. And then the client's memory fades to black. Afterwards the ER doctor told the client "had you stayed at home one hour longer, you would be dead." Septic shock nearly killed my client. A friendship saved a life. Today I finished reading Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond by Lydia Denworth. Her book pulled this memory from the back of my mind to the forefront. As an estate planning and probate attorney I spend my days preparing client documents related to illness and death. And I see the strain on faces when I ask who will be your health care agent? Who will be your backup? So many people have no obvious answer, and the stress is visible. Denworth's book is heavy on the hard science behind friendship, however, it is worth pushing through if you are more of a social policy student like myself. Sprinkled throughout the book are the personal stories that bring the science to life, at least for me. From birth to retirement age (and beyond), Denworth discuss how friendships are formed, and the benefits they provide. My take-away from this book is that a power of attorney for health care is important, forming the bonds to know who to name is critical. The more "isolated" an individual feels, the greater the risk of illness. Denworth states "those who answered that they had five or fewer interactions per month with close friends and family were considered isolated". Meaning mortality risk was increased. My only criticism of the book is that it was a bit lite on the how of friendship. She touches on the role of co-workers, faith-based organizations, community groups, and a group of friends and family. I would have enjoyed a bit more discussion, and suggestion, on how to build the critical face-to-face time into our busy lives. I can say her book influenced me. While reading this week my youngest asked for a sleepover on Friday night with 2 friends. My first thought was "no, we have a busy weekend, yada yada yada." Thinking about Denworth's discussion of her children's friends I went against my instinct and not only said "sure", but also invited a fiend of my son's to stay over as well. So our house will be filled with 5 children's voices Friday night. And when they have trouble settling down and not talking, I'll remind myself that they are forging critical friendship bonds, a lifelong need.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bryn

    This book was MOSTLY about how humans are social animals generally, not specific to friendship. The final chapter that got into friendship didn't feel particularly revelatory, although it reminds me of what I already know--how important my friends are to me and how cultivating those friendships is not only fun, but core to my physical and mental well-being. To summary the book in two sentences, "Waldinger[, Harvard professor who oversees a long-running study of well-being,] echoed Valliant, This book was MOSTLY about how humans are social animals generally, not specific to friendship. The final chapter that got into friendship didn't feel particularly revelatory, although it reminds me of what I already know--how important my friends are to me and how cultivating those friendships is not only fun, but core to my physical and mental well-being. To summary the book in two sentences, "Waldinger[, Harvard professor who oversees a long-running study of well-being,] echoed Valliant, [founding professor of the study,] in a TEDx Talk that has since accumulated nearly thirty-million views. 'The clearest message we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period." A good reminder at any time, but particularly this, as we find ourselves simultaneously isolated from friends and distant family and the outside world and in closer proximity than ever to our nuclear family or cluster.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kes

    This is a great book on why you should have friends. I also appreciated the distinction it draws between types of personalities and friendships: solitude is when you're ok with not having / having few friends; loneliness is when you want more friends than you have. Loneliness has a detrimental effect that is comparable to trauma (e.g. poverty). It is a book that's sympathetic to the lack of friends and the physical impact it has on people (people with close knit communities live longer). I liked This is a great book on why you should have friends. I also appreciated the distinction it draws between types of personalities and friendships: solitude is when you're ok with not having / having few friends; loneliness is when you want more friends than you have. Loneliness has a detrimental effect that is comparable to trauma (e.g. poverty). It is a book that's sympathetic to the lack of friends and the physical impact it has on people (people with close knit communities live longer). I liked the description of how humans have a social brain too - that different parts of the brain light up when making decisions. The author also works to make this book relate-able - there's lots of anecdotes about her and her children's personal friends, though I did notice that the friendships describe seem to be same-gender friendships.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex Koay

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I first started the book, I never expected the "bonds that bind us" to be such a contentious topic. And while I am still surprised to some extent, Lydia has definitely covered great ground on friendship, giving us an amazing survey of research to why it is needed and how we are trying to measure its impact, and also demonstrating that we are definitely not alone in being intensely social creatures (those monkeys though...) My only disappointment, if it can even be called as such, is that When I first started the book, I never expected the "bonds that bind us" to be such a contentious topic. And while I am still surprised to some extent, Lydia has definitely covered great ground on friendship, giving us an amazing survey of research to why it is needed and how we are trying to measure its impact, and also demonstrating that we are definitely not alone in being intensely social creatures (those monkeys though...) My only disappointment, if it can even be called as such, is that apart from prosetylizing the need for friendship, it does little to point those in need in a direction that could help them gain more friendships. It would be a nice addition for sure.

  18. 5 out of 5

    旭 楊

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Being isolated at home during the coronavirus break, this book is a really important reminder for me about friendship. My stupid idea was that friendship was a sign of weakness.. to find consolation among people means I'm not strong enough to be on my own. Maybe I'm just finding myself excuses for my social awkwardness. Anyway, connecting with people is important. And it's an effective way to gain self-worth. This book is too lengthy for me though. I'm not really drawn in by the stories about Being isolated at home during the coronavirus break, this book is a really important reminder for me about friendship. My stupid idea was that friendship was a sign of weakness.. to find consolation among people means I'm not strong enough to be on my own. Maybe I'm just finding myself excuses for my social awkwardness. Anyway, connecting with people is important. And it's an effective way to gain self-worth. This book is too lengthy for me though. I'm not really drawn in by the stories about experiments and the scientists. That's why I finished this book in about 2 hours.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christina Dudley

    This was an interesting read about the evolutionary purpose of friendship and biological underpinnings. I was delighted to learn that even fish have some fish version of pals. Sort of poignant to read about our need for social connection when we're all housebound, especially the older folks who might be in particular danger from loneliness. If you're looking for a book that will make you want to call up and reinforce your ties to others, I would recommend The Village Effect.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Rochelle

    Key takeaways: friendship is good for your brain, loneliness is bad for your health, quality over quantity, and you'll live longer if you surround yourself with good friends and loving family. I'd say more, but I really need to go chat with my friends. ;-)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Strobel

    FRIENDSHIP was engaging and enlightening. Denworth presented the science of friendship in a relatable way. Also, her personal stories cemented the ideas she presented in the book. Read this book and supercharge your friendships!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Every body need friends. Because its instinctual. Pay attention to your instincts. Every body need friends. Because it’s instinctual. Pay attention to your instincts.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Tagline: Why loneliness is bad for your health.

  24. 5 out of 5

    A'Llyn

    Interesting, engagingly explained information on the science of friendship. Lots of human and animal studies referenced.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    3.5 stars is more accurate. Fascinating but not a page turner.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This is a very well researched and well written summary of the current state of research on the role of friendship in health and well being including the evolutionary drivers.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is a Goodreads win review. This book is about the Evolution and power of Friendship. It was okay but very scientific.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Farley

    Absolutely fascinating.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Spiegel

  30. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Boeck

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