Hot Best Seller

O Jogo do Anjo

Availability: Ready to download

Na Barcelona turbulenta dos anos 20, um jovem escritor obcecado com um amor impossível recebe de um misterioso editor a proposta para escrever um livro como nunca existiu a troco de uma fortuna e, talvez, muito mais. Com deslumbrante estilo e impecável precisão narrativa, o autor de A Sombra do Vento transporta-nos de novo para a Barcelona do Cemitério dos Livros Esquecido Na Barcelona turbulenta dos anos 20, um jovem escritor obcecado com um amor impossível recebe de um misterioso editor a proposta para escrever um livro como nunca existiu a troco de uma fortuna e, talvez, muito mais. Com deslumbrante estilo e impecável precisão narrativa, o autor de A Sombra do Vento transporta-nos de novo para a Barcelona do Cemitério dos Livros Esquecidos, para nos oferecer uma aventura de intriga, romance e tragédia, através de um labirinto de segredos onde o fascínio pelos livros, a paixão e a amizade se conjugam num relato magistral.


Compare

Na Barcelona turbulenta dos anos 20, um jovem escritor obcecado com um amor impossível recebe de um misterioso editor a proposta para escrever um livro como nunca existiu a troco de uma fortuna e, talvez, muito mais. Com deslumbrante estilo e impecável precisão narrativa, o autor de A Sombra do Vento transporta-nos de novo para a Barcelona do Cemitério dos Livros Esquecido Na Barcelona turbulenta dos anos 20, um jovem escritor obcecado com um amor impossível recebe de um misterioso editor a proposta para escrever um livro como nunca existiu a troco de uma fortuna e, talvez, muito mais. Com deslumbrante estilo e impecável precisão narrativa, o autor de A Sombra do Vento transporta-nos de novo para a Barcelona do Cemitério dos Livros Esquecidos, para nos oferecer uma aventura de intriga, romance e tragédia, através de um labirinto de segredos onde o fascínio pelos livros, a paixão e a amizade se conjugam num relato magistral.

30 review for O Jogo do Anjo

  1. 4 out of 5

    JG (The Introverted Reader)

    David Martín is a writer of penny dreadfuls who is offered a huge sum of money to write a book for a French publisher. He can't find any evidence that the publisher actually exists though, and violent things start happening to David's friends and colleagues. I was rocking through the first half of the book, loving Ruiz Zafón's writing, and then I just stopped caring a little over halfway through. I'm not entirely sure what happened. I think I got sick of having absolutely no freaking idea what wa David Martín is a writer of penny dreadfuls who is offered a huge sum of money to write a book for a French publisher. He can't find any evidence that the publisher actually exists though, and violent things start happening to David's friends and colleagues. I was rocking through the first half of the book, loving Ruiz Zafón's writing, and then I just stopped caring a little over halfway through. I'm not entirely sure what happened. I think I got sick of having absolutely no freaking idea what was going on. Yeah, I knew who the publisher was, but I didn't know how that was going to tie into everything else. I read this using this really cool post-it-flag bookmark my husband gave me, because I knew that I would probably have tons of quotes I loved in here. The last one is at page 324 out of 531 pages. There's no big event that I can find there, I think that's just where I ran out of patience. I loved Ruiz Zafón's previous book, The Shadow of the Wind , and I have a feeling that a re-read would bump that one up to five stars. I missed having a Fermín. There wasn't really anyone to give any lightness or grace to the story. It was all darkness and despair. The relationship between David and Isabella gave a few lighter moments, but he ended up hurting her feelings more often than not, so those were pretty limited. This is sort of a companion to Shadow, and I had a hard time figuring out how and when they fit together. I was confused about how this Sempere was consistently described as being shy and sort of boring, when that wasn't the guy I knew from Shadow. This young Sempere is the father in Shadow. I have to say, my hat is off to the translator, Lucia Graves. She did one heckuva job translating this. The story might have lost me a little, but the writing is still lyrical, and that has to be as much to her credit as to the author's. Maybe I should have put this aside and tried it again later when I realized that I had started to lose interest. I don't think that would have made a difference though. It's still a dark, Gothic novel that fans of that genre will still probably love. I just preferred The Shadow of the Wind much, much more.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lee Goldberg

    The book starts out so well, rich in a character, humor, and a powerful sense of place. It captivated me from the first few pages. I couldn't wait to keep reading. I rewarded myself with it each night. I felt I was reading a truly great book, one I was certain would become a beloved favorite of mine. I was so in love, that I was willing to overlook a nagging flaw -- in a story where language and the craft of writing mean so much, where the writer himself aims a spotlight on authorial laziness (" The book starts out so well, rich in a character, humor, and a powerful sense of place. It captivated me from the first few pages. I couldn't wait to keep reading. I rewarded myself with it each night. I felt I was reading a truly great book, one I was certain would become a beloved favorite of mine. I was so in love, that I was willing to overlook a nagging flaw -- in a story where language and the craft of writing mean so much, where the writer himself aims a spotlight on authorial laziness ("Don Basilo was a forbidden-looking man with a bushy moustache who did not suffer fools and who subscribed to the theory that the liberal use of adverbs and adjectives was the mark of a pervert or someone with a vitamin deficiency"), I was astonished by the repeated reliance on cliche phrase. For example: "In this neck of the woods, one doesn't have to run very fast." "The editorial board had opted to take the bull by the horns..." "technically, it was my father who paid, but don't look a gift horse in the mouth" "my father came back and found me alive and kicking..." It was especially bewildering since the author is capable of such amazing, vivid, and fresh prose. How could he possibly let a cliche like "he let the cat out of the bag" get past the rough draft? Since the book is a translation, I will give the author the benefit of the doubt and assume it's the translator's fault and not his (one need only look at The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo for an example of that). But the cliches would be a minor annoyance if the rest of the book matched the brilliance of the first half. Unfortunately, the book quickly devolves into relentlessly dull exposition, delivered by one-note characters with absolutely no motivation or reason to deliver the speeches to our hero besides the author's need to relay the information. Worse, the plot, such as it was, totally collapses into an unintelligble, incoherent mess that isn't satisfying or entertaining. Nothing that was "planted" in the first half pays off in the second. For me, the book was a crushing disappointment.

  3. 5 out of 5

    ❄️Nani❄️

    4.5⭐ Hats off to you, Sir! I love this author so damn much!!! First, let's get the confusion out of the way. The Angel's Game, though the second book to the beautiful Shadow of the Wind, is neither a prequel nor a sequel. Essentially it is a stand-alone story that you can fully enjoy on its own but if you want to get the most out of it and discover all the connections that will enhance your reading experience with the characters, I highly recommend reading them in their publication order and not t 4.5⭐️ Hats off to you, Sir! I love this author so damn much!!! First, let's get the confusion out of the way. The Angel's Game, though the second book to the beautiful Shadow of the Wind, is neither a prequel nor a sequel. Essentially it is a stand-alone story that you can fully enjoy on its own but if you want to get the most out of it and discover all the connections that will enhance your reading experience with the characters, I highly recommend reading them in their publication order and not the timeline order of the books.  Only once have I come across a book, The Night Circus , where the setting becomes a major character by almost, but not quite, overshadowing the main characters. Here, the hero of TAG, David Martin is an engaging and sympathetic human but through the vivid language of Zafon, the surreal city of early-20th century Barcelona very nearly upstages both with its gloomy moods and its sinister beauty. Now, does The Angel’s Game match up to The Shadow of the Wind? Fuck. No. I mean, TSoTW was like, reading words dipped in magic. HOWEVER! This one had its own beat that sucked you in with its dark and eerie tone throughout. Also, I daresay the characters in this novel are a bit more complex than those in “The Shadow of the Wind”. In the years after World War I, a mysterious publisher, Andreas Corelli, offers our lead, David-a writer who suffers the torments of his craft- a great deal of money to write a narrative book that is to be the inspiration for a new religion, and after reluctantly accepting this deal, he starts having chilling encounters with characters who may be real or perhaps figments of his imagination and he is drawn into a terrifying maze of events that threaten his sanity if not his life. No point in saying more because, honestly, best to go in blind and have it challenge your own sense of reality vs. imagination. Zafón KNOWS how to write with grace and passion. His prose is eloquent and his abilities to spin a remarkably elaborate plot from a potentially simple idea is truly awe-inspiring.  The Angel's Game is filled with hapless victims who are driven mad or die in random accidents, paranoia, ill-fated love and as the story goes on, the narrative is littered with corpses, murdered policemen and so much more. Oh, and that cryptic epilogue! That left me with more questions than answers! and by the way, I've also read the third book in this series and, that's right, I was left with even more, gigantic snowball of questions than answers and to say I cannot wait for book four is the understatement of ages. DO NOT read this before The Shadow of The Wind! Okay, now I'm done.😊 prior to reading: Ahhh when fate intervenes. 😌 I couldn’t stop staring at this book so I picked it off my shelf JUST to peak through it (and hold it in my hands for a few seconds—honestly’ve no clue why I felt I had to do that🤔) but... now I can’t stop reading! Yup! I’ve decided it’s fate telling me to go back to the world of Cemetery of Forgotten Books.😍

  4. 4 out of 5

    Will M.

    David Martin is a pulp fiction writer struggling in life. He went to Barcelona in hope of a better future, and the mysterious man with an unbelievable offer seemed to fulfill his wish. The events after he accepted the offer changed his life forever. The first book, The Shadow of the Wind managed to exceed my expectations. I was a bit reluctant with this second one, but clearly Zafón is one hell of a writer. He once again managed to exceed my expectations. I consider him as one of the best Histori David Martin is a pulp fiction writer struggling in life. He went to Barcelona in hope of a better future, and the mysterious man with an unbelievable offer seemed to fulfill his wish. The events after he accepted the offer changed his life forever. The first book, The Shadow of the Wind managed to exceed my expectations. I was a bit reluctant with this second one, but clearly Zafón is one hell of a writer. He once again managed to exceed my expectations. I consider him as one of the best Historical-Fiction writer ever. He knows how to write. He knows how to keep the reader interested and captivated all throughout the novel. The plot was only a bit different than the first one, but still captivating. While reading the novel I once again felt like I was living the life of the main character. It felt like I was living in Barcelona the whole time. Zafón can really make the setting seem so believable. The writing was superb, and I could say that his writing is my favorite alongside Stephen King's. I really like it when the writer can make the character so likable and believable at the same time. Nothing changed from the first book, because both characters were unforgettable. David was just a fun guy to read about. He didn't seem pretentious, and the supporting characters were just as good. Isabella and Christina were both perfect for David, but obviously he only loved one, as the author tried to convey. (view spoiler)[ For me though, David had slight feelings toward Isabella, and she obviously reciprocated. Such a shame that they didn't end up together though. (hide spoiler)] The pacing was consistent. I was interested all throughout and the author even made the ending a bit fast paced than usual. The chapters near the end were action packed and the author surely gave the novel closure, despite the fact that there's a third book in the series. I hate it when a novel feels incomplete because of the ending, thankfully I didn't have that problem with this one. 5/5 stars and I can consider this one of my favorite books ever. Just as good, or even better than the first one. I can't wait to read the next book and novella real soon. I'm really recommending this book, and the author to any avid readers out there. With perfect writing and super plot and characters, you really can't go wrong with Zafón. Highly recommended with a plead to try out at least one of his novels.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This book was ALMOST a 5 star read for me. I really, really enjoyed it, and wish that I could give it 5 stars, but I feel like the loose ends were kind of rubber-banded together, rather than tied up all nice and pretty. But first I want to talk about the writing. GOR-GEOUS. Ruiz Zafon captured me with the first paragraph. In fact, while I was reading "What Dreams May Come" right before this, I snuck a peek and then almost didn't put it back down to finish "WDMC". I mean, look at this: "A writer n This book was ALMOST a 5 star read for me. I really, really enjoyed it, and wish that I could give it 5 stars, but I feel like the loose ends were kind of rubber-banded together, rather than tied up all nice and pretty. But first I want to talk about the writing. GOR-GEOUS. Ruiz Zafon captured me with the first paragraph. In fact, while I was reading "What Dreams May Come" right before this, I snuck a peek and then almost didn't put it back down to finish "WDMC". I mean, look at this: "A writer never forgets the first time he accepted a few coins or a word of praise in exchange for a story. He will never forget the sweet poison of vanity in his blood and the belief that, if he succeeds in not letting anyone discover his lack of talent, the dream of literature will provide him with a roof over his head, a hot meal at the end of the day, and what he covets most: his name on a miserable piece of paper that will surely outlive him. A writer is condemned to remember that moment, because from then on he is doomed and his soul has a price." A price, you say? Hmmm... Must read on! So I did, and found that with every page, I enjoyed the book even more. It was dark and gloomy and despairing and creepy at times, and at others it was laugh out loud funny and light and surprising. David, our narrator, is a young writer, who's had a hard time of life, and is therefore older than his years. He's bitter, and jaded, and sarcastic, but still idealistic in a way. I loved the way that he looked at things, and the life he brought to the pages. Even when he was writing himself to death, he's still interesting and dynamic and I wanted to know him better. So, in comes Andreas Correlli, mysterious and perfectly dressed and wanting to put David's talent to use for his own vague purposes. I recognized Correlli for what he was right away, as maybe I was intended to, so I waited anxiously for the inevitable. There is quite a bit of religious speculation and philosophy (if that's the right word) in this book, which was very interesting to me. The conversations that Correlli and David had regarding religion were maybe a touch over my head, but intriguing to read, because both men had more than reason enough to twist things to their own purposes in their conversations, and I was never quite sure whether what they were saying was really what they were saying. From David and Correlli's first meeting, things start to get more and more mysterious and strange. Very surreal in a realistic way, and quite intense. There were times when I'd have to force myself to put the book down to go to bed. And the chapters were so short that it was far too easy to justify "just one more". New twists and turns were introduced and I couldn't wait to figure out how they all fit together. But this is where things went a little bit downhill for me. While things were technically ended, and it wasn't a bad ending, I just wish that we had a bit more explanation as to certain things in the story, and that's why I had to drop a star off. I mean, I guess we could just look at it from a stand-point of "it is because it is because it is", but I'm always looking for the "why" too. I don't want to ruin this book for anyone who has yet to read it, because it is definitely worth reading, so I will not go into spoilerish stuff here. I will just say that I would have liked a bit more wrap up with certain converging storylines. Overall, I immensely enjoyed this book. The writing has a way of just making me part of the story, and the descriptions made me wish I could be in Barcelona to see it for myself. I look forward to reading "Shadow of the Wind" soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lavinia

    My, oh my! I had such great expectations from the book - I know, it's not fair - and I was so disappointed about how it ends I actually don't know anymore if I liked it or not. It starts OK, nothing spectacular at the beginning (well maybe that episode when David, a journalist at this point, visits the brothel - I still haven't figured out its connection with the rest of the story ), but after the first quarter it gets better and better. Now a writer, David is asked by a mysterious editor to writ My, oh my! I had such great expectations from the book - I know, it's not fair - and I was so disappointed about how it ends I actually don't know anymore if I liked it or not. It starts OK, nothing spectacular at the beginning (well maybe that episode when David, a journalist at this point, visits the brothel - I still haven't figured out its connection with the rest of the story ), but after the first quarter it gets better and better. Now a writer, David is asked by a mysterious editor to write THE book, something nobody has ever dared to write before, in exchange for an enormous sum of money. When Isabella shows up, the story gets even better. Besides the gothic atmosphere, mystery and religious/supernatural events - which, I have to admit, made my heart skip a beat a few times - I totally loved David-Isabella relationship. Their dialogues are so sparkling and witty and they act so stormy (have I watched too many romantic comedies?) I almost wanted them to hook up. But well, Zafon had other plans and David remains devoted to his one true love, Cristina, which leads to all kind of complicated events, because this is what love does, it complicates our already complicated lives, right? So, from one point onward the book totally got me (things disappear, people die, houses are burnt), I basically spent my weekend in bed with it, but the last 50 pages (chasing/escaping/fleeting away - so not my cup of tea) were such a bore and the ending so Spanish opera-meets-supernatural, I couldn't take it! I somehow wanted the-always-cool-never-scared David to end his life (heroically or not), but being a 1st person narrative that was quite impossible. So OK, let him live, but what have we done to deserve such a cheesy ending? (not spoiling anything about that :D) I might be ranting a lot, but don't get me wrong: Zafon has a real talent for story telling and the book is definitely a page-turner; if you're into mystery and thrillers, this is a good choice. And yes, bookworms or Barcelona admirers, for you too!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Char

    Last night, I listened to the end of this audiobook with tears in my eyes. I won't easily forget those last scenes. My favorite parts of this story were the visits to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books. I love the idea of a place where: "Every book, every volume you see here, has a soul. The first time someone visits this place, he must choose a book and adopt it, making sure that it will never disappear, that it will always stay alive." Just reading those sentences makes my soul sigh with contentm Last night, I listened to the end of this audiobook with tears in my eyes. I won't easily forget those last scenes. My favorite parts of this story were the visits to the Cemetery of Forgotten Books. I love the idea of a place where: "Every book, every volume you see here, has a soul. The first time someone visits this place, he must choose a book and adopt it, making sure that it will never disappear, that it will always stay alive." Just reading those sentences makes my soul sigh with contentment. I didn't enjoy this book quite as much as I enjoyed Shadow of the Wind. This tale was slightly darker and more mysterious, but I thought the mystery became a little convoluted. This was still a wonderful, beautifully written story that had me in tears more than once. What an amazing feeling that is. Highly recommended!

  8. 5 out of 5

    K

    When I'm reading something good, or even decent, I'll find myself reading just a few more pages when I should be doing housework or some other exciting chore. When I find myself finding all sorts of creative ways to waste time without even thinking of picking up my book, I know it's time to give up on it. Too bad -- I really liked The Shadow of the Wind. But unfortunately, like the sequel to The Pillars of the Earth, I think the author was trying too hard to recreate his own success at the expens When I'm reading something good, or even decent, I'll find myself reading just a few more pages when I should be doing housework or some other exciting chore. When I find myself finding all sorts of creative ways to waste time without even thinking of picking up my book, I know it's time to give up on it. Too bad -- I really liked The Shadow of the Wind. But unfortunately, like the sequel to The Pillars of the Earth, I think the author was trying too hard to recreate his own success at the expense of writing a good book. Zafon tried to bring back the same setting and some of the same characters and themes, but what seemed mystical and magical in Shadow was simply melodramatic here. Characterization was shallow and simplistic, as were the relationships; the writing was choppy. The story just didn't grab me, and nothing compelled me to push myself through 400 more pages.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell

    More like a 4.5 stars but still really, really good. I couldn't get enough of this book. It has the delightfully gothic elements that Ruiz Zafón does so well: mysterious figures, creepy mansions, blood and mist, and the eerie atmosphere of Barcelona at night. And of course, the importance of books in the story makes it quite an enjoyable read. The story follows David Martin, a writer for a newspaper and penny dreadfuls who gets sucked into a creepy plot with a figure called "the boss" who employs More like a 4.5 stars but still really, really good. I couldn't get enough of this book. It has the delightfully gothic elements that Ruiz Zafón does so well: mysterious figures, creepy mansions, blood and mist, and the eerie atmosphere of Barcelona at night. And of course, the importance of books in the story makes it quite an enjoyable read. The story follows David Martin, a writer for a newspaper and penny dreadfuls who gets sucked into a creepy plot with a figure called "the boss" who employs him to write a book. We get taken along on this journey as Martin discovers some secrets about the previous tenant of his home as well as the book Lux Aeterna that he picks up from the Cemetery of Forgotten Books. I absolutely LOVE how Ruiz Zafón writes about Barcelona. He creates such a vivid atmosphere that really transports you into the text. The plots are a bit self-aware at times, becoming quite unrealistic and borderline cheesy in their cliché, but I actually sort of enjoy them for that. You have to suspend your disbelief and enjoy the fantastical elements. It's like watching a noir film that has all the classic elements to it, but done in such a satisfying way that you can forgive them for their obviousness. Having already read The Shadow of the Wind before, it was fun to see the Cemetery of Forgotten Books as well as Sempere & Sons show up in this one, an earlier time period. And now I can't wait to do a re-read of Shadow!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jim Fonseca

    Like me, you will probably read The Angels' Game because you enjoyed immensely the author's The Shadow of the Wind. And it's all here again: the musty dusty bookstores of Barcelona with their Borges-like labyrinths and secret passageways. Decaying old mansions; a brooding half-crazed, over-caffeinated writer; darkness, shadows, death, murders, mystery and foreboding. The problem I had was with the plot. I couldn't tell at the end what the resolution was of the plot. I even skimmed back though th Like me, you will probably read The Angels' Game because you enjoyed immensely the author's The Shadow of the Wind. And it's all here again: the musty dusty bookstores of Barcelona with their Borges-like labyrinths and secret passageways. Decaying old mansions; a brooding half-crazed, over-caffeinated writer; darkness, shadows, death, murders, mystery and foreboding. The problem I had was with the plot. I couldn't tell at the end what the resolution was of the plot. I even skimmed back though the book trying to see what I must have missed and if I could figure it out - no luck. It's still a good read; just not as good as Shadow.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    In The Angel’s Game Zafon returns us to the Barcelona of his prior novel, Shadow of the Wind. Young David Martin is a copy boy at The Voice of Industry, but the newspaper’s star writer, Pedro Vidal, has been promoting David to the editor. Given a chance to write, David blossoms. Vidal later pushes him out of the newspaper so he can work for a pair of unscrupulous publishers of penny-dreadfuls. David is wildly successful at that as well, but pines to do more substantive writing. He is approached In The Angel’s Game Zafon returns us to the Barcelona of his prior novel, Shadow of the Wind. Young David Martin is a copy boy at The Voice of Industry, but the newspaper’s star writer, Pedro Vidal, has been promoting David to the editor. Given a chance to write, David blossoms. Vidal later pushes him out of the newspaper so he can work for a pair of unscrupulous publishers of penny-dreadfuls. David is wildly successful at that as well, but pines to do more substantive writing. He is approached by a mysterious man and offered an opportunity to escape his situation by writing an unusual book. Will success and comfort cost David his soul? No, really, his soul. He is driven by mourning for a lost love, and drawn to a house with a dark history. Zafon take us on a tour of early 20th century Barcelona. We see a city every bit as interesting as Dickens’ London. There are spooky houses, possibly haunted ones, criminal-infested alleys, an eerie man-made lake, plenty of dark corners and things that go bump. He offers a Dickensian array of characters—in fact, Great Expectations is referenced specifically several times—as Martin tries to figure out the mystery of the house and the real motivation behind his mysterious publisher. There are sinister policemen pursuing him for crimes he did not commit, lies and liars who try to misdirect him, angelic people who try to help him, and some exciting, Hitchcock-like scenes of high-altitude peril. I did not pay obsessive attention to the details of Zafon’s story so if there are logical errors, I did not note them. A small gripe. It happens too much that simple communication between people or characters could have dispelled years of emotional turmoil. I did find myself wishing a less buttoned up environment on some of Zafron’s people. Recognizing that in this time in this place, speaking the heart was a bit less done than it might be today, one can make allowances, but still, the urge remains to shout some encouragement or criticism. “Geez, man, get off your ass and tell her how you feel.” Spleen vented. The Angel’s Game dabbles in the mystical, which fits in with the foggy atmosphere of the tale. I could have done with a bit more explanation, though. Above all, The Angel’s Game is a fun read. Set aside your disbelief, curl up in a cushy chair, open the window to let early morning fog drift in and enjoy. PS - came across this article tonight in The Guardian - 'Extraordinary' 500-year-old library catalogue reveals books lost to time - by Alison Flood

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette "Astute Crabbist"

    Overall a well-told story with a clever and original plot. David Martin is a struggling author living in poverty in the seedy depths of Barcelona. He receives an irresistible offer of 100,000 francs to write a book for a creepy man he begins referring to as "the boss." After accepting the offer Martin starts research on the designated topic, triggering a series of strange happenings. He knows he is being "played" and used, but he doesn't know why or by whom. Things just get more and more siniste Overall a well-told story with a clever and original plot. David Martin is a struggling author living in poverty in the seedy depths of Barcelona. He receives an irresistible offer of 100,000 francs to write a book for a creepy man he begins referring to as "the boss." After accepting the offer Martin starts research on the designated topic, triggering a series of strange happenings. He knows he is being "played" and used, but he doesn't know why or by whom. Things just get more and more sinister and bizarre as Martin delves into the history of the man who used to live in the tower house he himself is now occupying. Once again, Zafon uses the setting of Barcelona to great advantage. The weather, strange architecture, cemeteries, secret passageways, winding staircases, and abandoned buildings all add to that dark and spooky feeling. While I enjoyed the book, I was left feeling a little frustrated about certain things. There were several characters that were not developed enough to make sense of their motivations, and there were some important things unresolved when I finished the book. It seemed that the author introduced a lot of elements to the plot that he never fully clarified by the end. I was determined to give this book a rating based on its own merits, not on a comparison with The Shadow of the Wind. So I asked myself how I would have rated it if it was written by an author I had never read before. In that case, it would have been four stars, so that's what I gave it. If I *were* comparing it to TSOTW, I would only give it 3 to 3.5 stars. I thought it lacked the richness and fulfillment of TSOTW. I would in no way discourage anyone from reading this book. However, if you haven't read The Shadow of the Wind, I strongly urge you to let that one be your first taste of this author.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elton

    The Angel's Game actually takes place in the same area of Barcelona as SOTW. Set in the period just before the civil war that leads up to SOTW. The main character is David Martin, who at the beginning of book is working at a newspaper & gets his chance to be a writer. Soon with the help of of his friend & mentor, Perdo Vidal, he is able to lift himself out of poverty & start writing for a living. He soon leaves the newspaper & starts writing pulp fiction under a pseudonym for a le The Angel's Game actually takes place in the same area of Barcelona as SOTW. Set in the period just before the civil war that leads up to SOTW. The main character is David Martin, who at the beginning of book is working at a newspaper & gets his chance to be a writer. Soon with the help of of his friend & mentor, Perdo Vidal, he is able to lift himself out of poverty & start writing for a living. He soon leaves the newspaper & starts writing pulp fiction under a pseudonym for a less than desirable publishing house. But while making good money, he realizes that he is truly not happy & longs to write for himself. Soon he's approached by a mysterious benefactor, Andreas Corelli, who asks David to write a book for him. The subject would be Corelli's choosing. And David would have one year to write it. Once he's done, he will be rich & free to write for himself. But just who is this man giving him this chance? And what will it truly cost him in the end? I'd tell you more, but that might give something away. Much like SOTW, there is an overall mystery winding it's way through the story. But at the same time there is a fabulous love story/triangle and sins of the past come back to haunt the characters. Zafón really shines in his storytelling & his dialogue. The interaction between David & his "ward/protege", Isabella, is simply magic. As with SOTW, you really fall into the lives of these characters & live and breathe with them. But eventually the story has to end. And at the end I was in tears, not just because of the story, but simply because I knew my time with these characters was coming to a close. This is a book I would highly recommend, definitely in my top 20 of all time. (This review can also be read at my blog, which can be found here

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Do you love a book that has people dying in fetid pools, rotting in chambers, burned alive? Do you love gothic novels that leave you feeling bleaker than you did when you sat down to read with your bag of microwave popcorn? Do you love books that attack belief systems by dismissing the supernatural, and then indulge in the supernatural? I don't. Don't get me wrong--I don't mind sorrow in a story, or the vestiges of tragedy, or philosophy, or heavy emotional lifting. But Zafon's writing was too good Do you love a book that has people dying in fetid pools, rotting in chambers, burned alive? Do you love gothic novels that leave you feeling bleaker than you did when you sat down to read with your bag of microwave popcorn? Do you love books that attack belief systems by dismissing the supernatural, and then indulge in the supernatural? I don't. Don't get me wrong--I don't mind sorrow in a story, or the vestiges of tragedy, or philosophy, or heavy emotional lifting. But Zafon's writing was too good for the plot, especially one that doesn't resolve, and the story ends up more like a spooky B movie in the way the scenes are written. Look out, it's a foggy night. Hey, that pack of starving dogs in the graveyard are freaky huh. What is that trace of red on the snow? Of course it's blood. What's with all the empty deserted houses laden with dust and moldy curtains? Miss Havisham was Zafon's set decorator, for sure. I very much enjoyed all the references to great books, and I loved looking for connections between Dickens's Great Expectations and the happenings in this novel. In fact, the first 150 pages of this book were completely enjoyable, and then came this descent into a pointless mystery with no resolution. Or is the point that only books save us (metaphorically and literally--the way Martín is saved by The Steps of Heaven) and that authors have to use their powers for good and not evil? Zafon's book will save no one, and he should take his own moral hint. Three stars for David and Isabella's conversation and relationship, for my love for the bookseller, for the bits of humor sprinkled throughout, and for being a page turner even though I felt that the last page of the book would have been more honest if there had been a big old "Ha Ha! Made you look!" sentence instead of the pathetic epilogue. Spoiler alert:: having a character run away is just as poor an end to a story as having the character wake up and find everything was a dream.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Menace Not as good as Shadow of the Wind. I really like Carlos Ruiz Zafon’s style as he manages to create a feeling of menace and foreboding in his writing that is just perfect for a mysterious thriller. There is always a hint of supernatural that brings an eerie haunting atmosphere that keeps you wondering what’s right around the corner or who’s watching. The main character is made an offer that he can't resist but what is the real cost? While the guessing game is what we all love in a mystery Menace Not as good as Shadow of the Wind. I really like Carlos Ruiz Zafon’s style as he manages to create a feeling of menace and foreboding in his writing that is just perfect for a mysterious thriller. There is always a hint of supernatural that brings an eerie haunting atmosphere that keeps you wondering what’s right around the corner or who’s watching. The main character is made an offer that he can't resist but what is the real cost? While the guessing game is what we all love in a mystery we do need to satisfy our curiosity and the end rambled on a bit and didn’t really come together well enough.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Yzobelle

    Once more, Zafon takes his readers to a thrilling ride into a web of stories. And any ride with Zafon is guaranteed to be breathtaking. In the Angel's Game, Zafon has again exhibited his specialty in leading his readers into a series of intricate stories. He makes sure his readers enter that labyrinth of events so engrossed that they would hardly feel that they have been sucked into it. But great Zafon makes sure that his readers come out of it safe. He really has that talent of giving little une Once more, Zafon takes his readers to a thrilling ride into a web of stories. And any ride with Zafon is guaranteed to be breathtaking. In the Angel's Game, Zafon has again exhibited his specialty in leading his readers into a series of intricate stories. He makes sure his readers enter that labyrinth of events so engrossed that they would hardly feel that they have been sucked into it. But great Zafon makes sure that his readers come out of it safe. He really has that talent of giving little unexpected twists here and there while ending the whole story with one big unforeseen twist. The ride through the whole book is something to be cherished. He successfully puts his readers under his spell -- playing with their emotions through his sarcastic humor, manly ego, proud wit, writer's vanity, and pure friendship. There is so much wisdom in Zafon's words, through Sempere the bookseller: "Every book has a soul, the soul of the person who wrote it, and of those who read it and dream about it." Am sure Angel's Game, Shadow of the Wind, and even The Prince of Mist will be the content of my dreams for quite a long time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I am a patient reader. I can cope with ambiguity and digression. I enjoy ornate prose and the occasional serving of melodrama. I don't need each and every element of a plot spelled out for me. This means that I loved (almost) every over-the-top melodramatic moment of the first in Carlos Ruiz Zafon's "Cemetery of Lost Books" series, The Shadow of the Wind. Reading that novel, I was carried away to Barcelona during the Spanish Civil War and thoroughly enjoyed Ruiz Zafon's magical prose. My overwhe I am a patient reader. I can cope with ambiguity and digression. I enjoy ornate prose and the occasional serving of melodrama. I don't need each and every element of a plot spelled out for me. This means that I loved (almost) every over-the-top melodramatic moment of the first in Carlos Ruiz Zafon's "Cemetery of Lost Books" series, The Shadow of the Wind. Reading that novel, I was carried away to Barcelona during the Spanish Civil War and thoroughly enjoyed Ruiz Zafon's magical prose. My overwhelmingly positive experience of The Shadow of the Wind means that I really looked forward to reading this novel. Set some twenty years before The Shadow of the Wind, it focuses on a young writer of sensationalist crime novels, David Martin, who is commissioned by a stranger to write a book and finds himself drawn into a nightmarish world where nothing is what it seems to be. It starts out well. Ruiz Zafon creates a sinister, threatening atmosphere within the architectural splendour of Barcelona. David Martin is an interesting character, as is the main antagonist, who may or may not be (view spoiler)[Lucifer incarnate (hide spoiler)] . There are discussions of religion, the importance of books and reading and the nature of love. However, it all falls apart at about the halfway point. There's too much ambiguity and digression and too much melodrama. By the end, I had no idea what was going on and what's worse, I didn't much care. I listened to the audiobook edition (which is very well narrated by Dan Stevens) and it occurred to me that my loss of both focus and interest may not have occurred had I been reading the novel rather than listening to it. But I'm not really convinced that's so. It's not as if the novel has nothing going for it. The prose is great, the translation by Lucia Graves is excellent (at least, I assume it is, because it reads like a book written in English) and the threatening, rather Gothic atmosphere Ruiz Zafon creates jump off the page. Four stars for these aspects of the novel and two for the messy, confusing and overblown plot leaves an average of three. I'll definitely go on to read the third book in the series, The Prisoner of Heaven, if for no other reason than I'm hoping it will explain what this novel was all about. Thank you to Jemidar for accompanying me on the journey. The fact that both of us were confused makes me feel better.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emer (A Little Haze)

    Imagine a book that is a mystery with the sensibility of a gothic horror but is also a story about loyalty and friendships, and love and betrayal. How can one book be so many things and not feel like a gigantic mess? Well in the hands of Carlos Ruiz Zafón it seems such feats are indeed possible. 'The Angel's Game' is the second book in his The Cemetery of Forgotten Book series following on from my much loved The Shadow of the Wind. But it's not a direct sequel. It's a prequel but can very much b Imagine a book that is a mystery with the sensibility of a gothic horror but is also a story about loyalty and friendships, and love and betrayal. How can one book be so many things and not feel like a gigantic mess? Well in the hands of Carlos Ruiz Zafón it seems such feats are indeed possible. 'The Angel's Game' is the second book in his The Cemetery of Forgotten Book series following on from my much loved The Shadow of the Wind. But it's not a direct sequel. It's a prequel but can very much be read as a standalone. I don't know how to explain the storyline other than to say I was entirely captivated. I never for one second knew where the plot would twist and turn to next. These are truly books for book-lovers. Whereas Shadow explored a love for books more from a reader's vantage this one touches on the love a writer has for the written word. “I had always felt that the pages I left behind were a part of me. Normal people bring children into the world; we novelists bring books. We are condemned to put our whole lives into them, even though they hardly ever thank us for it. We are condemned to die in their pages and sometimes even to let our books be the ones who, in the end, will take our lives.” As with The Shadow of the Wind the quality of the writing is of the highest calibre. The streets of Barcelona truly come alive in the pages of this book as do the colourful, larger than life characters who inhabit them. My absolute favourite thing about this book was the relationship between David and Isabella. It was so gloriously written. They perfectly complimented each other in their roles as mentor and student and the true friendship that blossomed between them is one of the most beautiful connections between two people that I've ever read. Admittedly this book doesn't quite reach the perfection of its published precursor as the ending is a little more hurried than I would like but it makes for an absolutely rip-roaring of a read. And reading this has made me incredibly excited to read book three in the series. four stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's hard for me to review Zafon's work, because I love it so much. I see the flaws in this novel, it may be a bit too wordy and the plot becomes convoluted in the second half, but I still loved it. Set in the Early 20th century in Barcelona, The Angel’s Game precedes the events in Zafon’s novel, The Shadow of the Wind, but shares a few of the same characters. David Martin is a poor journalist writing pulp fiction on the side, but he dreams of doing something greater. Zafon’s style of writing ju It's hard for me to review Zafon's work, because I love it so much. I see the flaws in this novel, it may be a bit too wordy and the plot becomes convoluted in the second half, but I still loved it. Set in the Early 20th century in Barcelona, The Angel’s Game precedes the events in Zafon’s novel, The Shadow of the Wind, but shares a few of the same characters. David Martin is a poor journalist writing pulp fiction on the side, but he dreams of doing something greater. Zafon’s style of writing just drips with gorgeous descriptions, devious characters and tragic heroes. His gothic tales are so rich I am willing to forgive much that I would fault another author for. Like so many others, I didn't love this book as much as I loved The Shadow of the Wind, but again, I still loved it. Zafon has a few themes he always returns to in his work: the relationships between fathers and sons, men falling in love women in a higher social class, references to classic novels (Great Expectations, The Count of Monte Cristo), etc. This novel is no exception and it includes all of those things. **SPOILERS: Where I discuss my thoughts on Andreas Corelli** This year I re-read both Shadow of the Wind and this book and I’ve found that re-reading Zafon’s work is a lot like re-watching The Sixth Sense, once you know the ending you view the whole thing through a different lens. There’s one section where David meets Andreas Corelli and Corelli talks about his strained relationship with his father. He said he was cast out of his home and I couldn’t help thinking this was a clever reference to his father being “God” and Corelli being the Devil. Also, I forgot quite a bit about the details of David’s brain tumor. The most fascinating thing about this book is its ambiguity. For some it’s clear Corelli is the Devil and Martin makes a Faustian deal for both his health and what his soul desires. For others Martin is clearly a victim of his own delusions, brought on by his brain tumor. It’s possible his hallucinations are caused by schizophrenia or his brain tumor and the entire character of Corelli exists only in his mind. This is possibly enforced by Martin’s mumbling conversations (witnessed by Fermin) with himself while imprisoned in The Prisoner of Heaven. If it is all in David’s mind, then he’s the one who killed his Publisher’s, not Corelli. Or it’s possible Corelli used David as a puppet and committed the murders through him and then made him forget them. This might be supported by the moment when David saves Isabella and then leaves her attackers in the alley. He hears later that they were beaten with a pipe, just like the one he was carrying. So that indicates he might have done it but then blocked it out, Fight Club-style. There are so many possibilities! Another indicator that Corelli really is the Devil, regardless of whether or not others can see him; the first author who lived in the Tower House went through the same thing David did. If it’s all in David’s head then the other author’s story wouldn’t make sense. And we see Christina go crazy and speak to an invisible person, which once again suggests that Corelli is there. So my conclusion in the end is that I think it’s a combination of both things. I think it is madness, but I think it’s caused by Corelli who really is the Devil. He uses the madness as a weapon to get what he wants from people. **SPOILERS OVER** I was forewarned by other fans not to rush through The Angel’s Game, as I was tempted to do. Zafon is an author that should be savored. His novels are so full of his passion for both Barcelona and reading that I found myself wishing I could wander the city's streets after I put the book down. I wish so badly that the Cemetery of Forgotten Books was a real place Now that I have re-read this one I feel like I’ve noticed so many more important details and I understand it much better. I have a feeling my appreciation for it will deepen each time I return to it. BOTTOM LINE: A beautifully twisted and strange novel, The Angel’s Game will leave you reeling and wanting to start it all over again when you finish. The complicated plot isn’t for everyone, but it’s worth it if you loved The Shadow of the Wind. If you read and enjoy that one then I would recommend both The Angel's Game and The Prisoner of Heaven. “We looked at each other bound by an infinite complicity that needed no words.”

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I’ll say one thing for Carlos Ruiz Zafon, you never think you would like to lay his books aside while you are reading them. He presents you with one mystery after another and little clues and pieces that you know are going to figure into the story later but can never imagine how. I find it amazing that anyone could begin to conceive to such complex storylines. David Martin, an aspiring writer, finds himself embroiled in a very complicated web of evil and sometimes supernatural occurrences, and pa I’ll say one thing for Carlos Ruiz Zafon, you never think you would like to lay his books aside while you are reading them. He presents you with one mystery after another and little clues and pieces that you know are going to figure into the story later but can never imagine how. I find it amazing that anyone could begin to conceive to such complex storylines. David Martin, an aspiring writer, finds himself embroiled in a very complicated web of evil and sometimes supernatural occurrences, and part of the fun is trying to determine whether what he is experiencing is “real” in terms of his perceptions. Is he dealing with people? Devils? Is he imagining things? Can any of this be explained in a way that will make sense to anyone besides David? Are people at risk just because they care about him? And, if he is fighting the devil, can he win? I like having a riddle to solve and I can appreciate a clever and intelligent riddler. Not quite as good as The Shadow of the Wind, but close.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beatrix

    Everything is a tale, Martin. What we believe, what we know, what we remember, even what we dream. Everything is a story, a narrative, a sequence of events with characters communicating an emotional content. We only accept as true what can be narrated. Zafón’s books are pure magic. And while I loved The Shadow of the Wind because of the story, I enjoyed The Angel’s Game primarily because of its protagonist, David Martin. I really can’t properly describe why I love Zafón as a writer; you trul Everything is a tale, Martin. What we believe, what we know, what we remember, even what we dream. Everything is a story, a narrative, a sequence of events with characters communicating an emotional content. We only accept as true what can be narrated. Zafón’s books are pure magic. And while I loved The Shadow of the Wind because of the story, I enjoyed The Angel’s Game primarily because of its protagonist, David Martin. I really can’t properly describe why I love Zafón as a writer; you truly need to read him to understand. His words are so powerful, and his books so atmospheric; when I’m reading one of his books I feel like I belong to that Barcelona of the early 20th century. To me, he’s special because he so skillfully combines genres. In fact, I’d dare say that Zafón transcends genres, his books belong to a category of their own. Here you’ll find it all: history, tragedy, mystery, romance, comedy… Every work of art is aggressive, Isabella. And every artist's life is a small war or a large one, beginning with oneself and one's limitations. To achieve anything you must first have ambition and then talent, knowledge, and finally the opportunity. Now, there are two main reasons why I loved this book so much and two tiny little things that bothered me. First the good; the writing is simply remarkable. I loved the pacing, the dialogues, the characters. I love the fact that despite this being a gothic novel, it doesn’t lack humor. The second reason is the protagonist – David Martin. I loved him even more than Daniel Sempere, from the Shadow. Furthermore, what I didn’t like that much was the forced love story between Cristina and David. I personally found no sparks between the two and I thought Cristina was so grumpy and moody. On the other hand, I absolutely loved Isabella. Her conversations with David (her Mr. Rochester) were among my favorites in the novel. Life had taught her that we all require big and small lies in order to survive, just as much as we need air. She used to say that if during one single day, from dawn to dusk, we could see the naked reality of the world, and of ourselves, we would either take our own lives or lose our minds. This book touches upon magical realism at times, and if, like me, you’re generally not the biggest fan, I think it’s better to be prepared beforehand – you might not get all the answers after you finish this book. And finally, that ending needs to be addressed. I can see why some readers were left confused and thought the ending was ambiguous and unsatisfactory. I have to agree that the last 100 pages were not as good as the rest of the novel; I loved the build-up, but I believe the novel could’ve been wrapped up more nicely. Who is in fact Andreas Corelli? (view spoiler)[Is he an angel or the devil? Or perhaps just a fragment of Martin’s imagination? (hide spoiler)] Nevertheless, the story does not end here. All three books from The Cemetery of Forgotten Books are related. Now, having read the Angel, some things from the Shadow are clearer to me; just as you will fully understand this book (and Martin’s fate) if you read The Prisoner of Heaven too. (view spoiler)[If you must know now: we learn that Martin is mentally unstable, and I think that here he was a unreliable narrator of sorts. Corelli might not have even been real. And we also realize just how strong his and Isabella’s friendship had been. I really wanted the two of them together…but, that ship has sailed. (hide spoiler)] In conclusion, I’d wholeheartedly recommend this book (and any other by Zafón) to everyone who loves books, who lives and breathes them. With his books you will feel at home and be reminded as to why you read; because as he says: Truth is always hidden in fiction.

  22. 4 out of 5

    TL

    “Every book has a soul, the soul of the person who wrote it and the soul of those who read it and dream about it.” ---- “We spend a good part of our lives dreaming, especially when we're awake.” " A writer never forgets the first time he accepted a few coins or a word of praise in exchange for a story. He will never forget the sweet poison of vanity in his blood and the belief that, if he succeeds in not letting anyone discover his lack of talent, the dream of literature will provide him with a r “Every book has a soul, the soul of the person who wrote it and the soul of those who read it and dream about it.” ---- “We spend a good part of our lives dreaming, especially when we're awake.” " A writer never forgets the first time he accepted a few coins or a word of praise in exchange for a story. He will never forget the sweet poison of vanity in his blood and the belief that, if he succeeds in not letting anyone discover his lack of talent, the dream of literature will provide him with a roof over his head, a hot meal at the end of the day, and what he covets the most: his name printed on a miserable piece of paper that will surely outlive him. A writer is condemned to remember that moment, because from then on he is doomed and his soul has a price." "I could have left, chosen any other tome from among the hundreds of thousands, and abandoned that place, never to return. I almost thought I had done just that, as I walked back through the tunnels and corridors of the labyrinth, until I became aware of the book in my hands, like a parasite stuck to my skin. For a split second the idea crossed my mind that the book had a greater desire to leave the place than I did." "I dreamed that I was traveling in a train made of black bones, its coaches shaped like coffins, crossing a deserted Barcelona that was strewn with discarded clothes, as if the bodies that had occupied them had simply evaporated. A wasteland of abandoned hats and dresses, suits and shoes that covered the silent streets. The engine gave off a trail of scarlet smoke that spread across the sky like spilled paint." I could quote this whole thing haha.. took my time with this, wanting to savor each and every word. Mister Zafon's writing <3! I can't say anything new than what I've said before but I will say it again... simply gorgeous:) This a haunting story and some of the time you are not completely sure what is happening... whether David is crazy or not, what the deal with 'the boss' is, what really happened with Marlasca and the fire with those snake publishers... you just get caught up in everything and time slips away. This is the second book but all the events take place before 'Shadow of the Wind'... it made me smile then and now to spot the little connections of people and things that pop up in that one as well. Especially when you know what will happen to certain people and how it shaped their loved ones. Cemetery of Forgotten books: I would love to live there, make the trek to donate books, pick one myself *happy sigh* A whole book about it would so lovely, so much history you can feel in the place as you walk with those who walk its many paths. Would highly recommend this and any of Mister Zafon's work *waves* happy reading!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I absolutely loved The Shadow of the Wind and expected this book to be my favorite book of the year. Perhaps my expectations were too high to give it a fair chance. I didn't care for the story. I rarely felt like picking the book up after taking a break but continued to think that there would be some redeeming aspect as I read and was closer to the end. I would not recommend this book- it was terrible. I lent it to a friend and she didn't even bother finishing it (she reads a couple hundred book I absolutely loved The Shadow of the Wind and expected this book to be my favorite book of the year. Perhaps my expectations were too high to give it a fair chance. I didn't care for the story. I rarely felt like picking the book up after taking a break but continued to think that there would be some redeeming aspect as I read and was closer to the end. I would not recommend this book- it was terrible. I lent it to a friend and she didn't even bother finishing it (she reads a couple hundred books each year and has only given up on a book four or five times). I'm sad to say that this book is nothing like the great Shadow of the Wind.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    This is a hard book for me to rate and review. The writing, of course, was exquisite, always to be expected from Carlos Ruiz Zafón. And I certainly enjoyed reading what was a prequel, timewise, to The Shadow of the Wind, but the primary storyline of this one was just not something I could fully grasp, understand, follow or believe. It had a supernatural 'spell' thrown into the mix which just wasn't my cup of tea. I have to say, though, that it takes a brilliant writer to come up with this; in ad This is a hard book for me to rate and review. The writing, of course, was exquisite, always to be expected from Carlos Ruiz Zafón. And I certainly enjoyed reading what was a prequel, timewise, to The Shadow of the Wind, but the primary storyline of this one was just not something I could fully grasp, understand, follow or believe. It had a supernatural 'spell' thrown into the mix which just wasn't my cup of tea. I have to say, though, that it takes a brilliant writer to come up with this; in addition to tying it into a series. So while I thought The Shadow of the Wind was near perfect, in fact I read it twice, this one fell short. But I plan to continue with the series and am looking forward to getting back to Daniel, Bea and the other characters in the next book, The Prisoner of Heaven. Joint read with NI friends, Susan and Sarah. Glad to have finally read it since I've owned it since 2009. How embarrassing!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid

    4.5 stars Weird and interesting...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    The Angel's Game is the second in the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series which began with The Shadow Of The Wind. Each book is an independent entity and yet the stories are interwoven. They can be read in any order. Much darker than the first, this is an entirely different mystery. The question for me was, "At what price, does the artist sell his soul for the sake of his art?" And does the giving up of the soul involve a bargain with Lucifer, or losing touch with reality and self in a combinatio The Angel's Game is the second in the Cemetery of Forgotten Books series which began with The Shadow Of The Wind. Each book is an independent entity and yet the stories are interwoven. They can be read in any order. Much darker than the first, this is an entirely different mystery. The question for me was, "At what price, does the artist sell his soul for the sake of his art?" And does the giving up of the soul involve a bargain with Lucifer, or losing touch with reality and self in a combination of hallucinations, schizophrenic stupor or frenzy? Or in this case, a brain tumor... The author leaves this up to the reader to decide and the possible interpretations are many. One of the strongest aspects of Carlos Ruiz Zafon's work is his descriptive writing of Barcelona and the atmosphere he creates. Personally this one wasn't as solid as the first and the ending was too nebulous for my taste. I'm more of a concrete reader. However, I love a bibliophiles' tale and didn't realize until I was doing an Amazon search that there is a freebie Kindle called The Rose Of Fire, which is a short background on the origins of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, which takes place during the Inquisition. Sounds like FUN!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    I really did not understood this book, I don't know how it connects to the first one (or maybe it's been many months since I read the first book in the series that I have forgotten certain aspects of the books). The ending is very weird and it doesn't satisfy all plots within the book, the book deals with the occult, love, friendship, betrayals and the search for redemption. I'm giving it 4 stars because the story in itself is good , just not a good sequel to the first one . I did love the conve I really did not understood this book, I don't know how it connects to the first one (or maybe it's been many months since I read the first book in the series that I have forgotten certain aspects of the books). The ending is very weird and it doesn't satisfy all plots within the book, the book deals with the occult, love, friendship, betrayals and the search for redemption. I'm giving it 4 stars because the story in itself is good , just not a good sequel to the first one . I did love the conversations between the main character and mr Corelli and found myself agreeing with a lot of the points he would make. But the again that was just the icing on the top, good book, poorly connected sequel....have you guys read this book?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I've waited two years for this book. Though unemployed, I paid full price and bought it the very first day it came out. To date, I have reread it's predecessor (though this book was the prequel) three times and given away four copies and named a cat that sat in the front window of an art gallery I passed every day on Market Street Nuria, as homage to Ruiz Zafon's first book. And, before I go on, I will say I had a busy month--I got a job and so I didn't have the sort of dedication I might have b I've waited two years for this book. Though unemployed, I paid full price and bought it the very first day it came out. To date, I have reread it's predecessor (though this book was the prequel) three times and given away four copies and named a cat that sat in the front window of an art gallery I passed every day on Market Street Nuria, as homage to Ruiz Zafon's first book. And, before I go on, I will say I had a busy month--I got a job and so I didn't have the sort of dedication I might have been able to provide if still unemployed (that's the ONLY time I will mention unemployment with any sort of wistful tones). Where The Shadow of the Wind took me a week and a half, tops, this book took me a month, so perhaps that's largely due to my preoccupations. Nonetheless--I got to the last few pages of this book and flatly didn't get it. While SotW had a deeply involved plot and multitude of characters, I loved them all and each fit neatly into the scope of things. The Angel's Game left me wondering WHO they all were, WHY they were running around, ruining David Martin's life--and How they'd all gotten there in the first place. Frankly it was a shock: same literary tactics and basic genre of book as SotW, yet it was completely ineffective, as opposed to its remarkable continuation. WHY???? Yes, Barcelona is still magical, and the fantastic Cemetery of Forgotten books appears, ready to ensnare literati with images of dark passage ways, nooks, crannies and best of all--BOOKS, and rare ones at that. But, even Zafon's version of Shakespeare and Co. times a 100 couldn't draw me in fully. Who is Marlesca and who is Corelli? If he truly is the devil, unlike SotW's more subtle Lain/Carax and the implication we're all our own demons--why is that never really made clear? What is IN the tower house behind the clay wall and wardrobe (and, a wardrobe? Really?)? The author, apparently an accomplished musician, wrote a score for this book. I've yet to hear it, but, though I love music, perhaps this is the ultimate indication no one can multi-task. This book COULD have been just as wondrous as Zafon's book before it--but it seems rushed and faithless--there is no mental thrill to this book and no dark spots in anyone's souls. Instead, The Angel's Game is more two-dimensional--people are truly evil. There's no mention of how they became that way, or why--they just, very simply, are fallen angels who elude to their fall from grace through domestic nuances, though a seven year-old could understand "my father kicked me out before I was ready." I've read criticisms that The Shadow of the Wind was hard to follow, and the character base too extensive. I beg to differ. If the characters have life, there is no such thing as too many. The world is filled with people, and if each one is individual, they all have a place. But this book lacked depth, and the characters turned into a giant dark blob. I haven't had time to effectively mourn for this book--I will have to re-read it first to confirm my fears, but I'm pretty sure this was a dud. I snatch up any gothic/book/historian themed novel I can find--as they are the very best to get lost in. I even like the mediocre ones, just because I love this type of book--but the 13th Tale was better, The Secret of Lost Things was better. This is like...The Basic 8 after reading The Secret History and Crash Topics. Let. Down.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Luís C.

    The second installment of the author Carlos Ruiz Zafón, sent us again in the city of Barcelona in the 30's of the industrial revolution and post-Spanish civil war. He narrates the story of David Martin, fatherless orphaned and abandoned by his mother, who gets a job as a messenger / servant in a small newspaper in Barcelona. His goal is to become a journalist to practice his writing, and become a writer like his mentor Pedro Vidal. One day the editor of the newspaper gives David an opportunity to The second installment of the author Carlos Ruiz Zafón, sent us again in the city of Barcelona in the 30's of the industrial revolution and post-Spanish civil war. He narrates the story of David Martin, fatherless orphaned and abandoned by his mother, who gets a job as a messenger / servant in a small newspaper in Barcelona. His goal is to become a journalist to practice his writing, and become a writer like his mentor Pedro Vidal. One day the editor of the newspaper gives David an opportunity to write a small column. David then decides to write a small story of terror, where the action took place in the city of Barcelona. His text is successful to the public, and with this success is given the opportunity to continue writing; but with more success that their stories are having, more jealousy and envy exist in the wording. At last, a plot organized by his editorial colleagues, is fired from the newspaper. The only one who stays by his side is his friend Pedro Vidal, who at the same time is his mentor. Pedro Vidal is a son of an industrial millionaire, who only lives for pleasure, culture and try to write a masterpiece of literature. With the help of Dom Pedro, David manages to find work in a publishing house, which publishes his horror stories monthly under a pseudonym, paying a sum. With guaranteed money and more or less certain work, David wants to realize two dreams, one is to try to write a legitimate novel; and the other to have a love affair with Cristina Sagnier, daughter of D. Pedro's driver. In love with Cristiana since he was a child, he tries to rise in the young woman's regard, because she does not find what David writes about his level, he thinks he is a writer to be on a plateau above the rest. But with the deadlines of their publications always falling, they do not give David Martin time to write his novel nor to enrich, to give a comfortable life to Christina. One day he receives an invitation from a mysterious publisher, who offers a huge amount to write a book unprecedented in the literary world that will revolutionize the world. By accepting, David is free of his monetary problems and his illness, but without his world as he knows he gives a hundred and eighty degrees. David begins to regret accepting the mysterious publisher's offer and begins to investigate who he is. When he begins to discover facts unrelated to him, he tries to solve these same problems that he was not expecting.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris_P

    The Angel’s Game was written by someone who, at times, reminded me of the Zafon I met through the pages of the extraordinary Shadow of the Wind. Up until the final third of the book he was pretty much there, with his bewitching desriptions and his unique way of painting pictures that can haunt you in your sleep. And then, someone took his place. An anxious guy, chased by editorial deadlines and pressured by factors that have little to do with the act of writing. In the end, few things made sense The Angel’s Game was written by someone who, at times, reminded me of the Zafon I met through the pages of the extraordinary Shadow of the Wind. Up until the final third of the book he was pretty much there, with his bewitching desriptions and his unique way of painting pictures that can haunt you in your sleep. And then, someone took his place. An anxious guy, chased by editorial deadlines and pressured by factors that have little to do with the act of writing. In the end, few things made sense and the admittedly interesting plot he had built collapsed upon him, scattering pieces of what was the promise of something solid all over the place. I can't see how it can satisfy someone who appreciated the Shadow as much as I did. If it wasn’t for the first half and the heart-wrenching epilogue, this would be the end of my relationship with Zafon and his Cemetery.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.